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Removing front brake caliper - Bolts very stuck


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#1 Robert Jan

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Posted 19 August 2008 - 08:34 AM

Any good ideas on how to loosen the bolts that hold the brake caliper?
They are very stuck indeed and I don't want to ruin them without suggestions from the lot of you :-)

#2 JimAttrill

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Posted 19 August 2008 - 08:46 AM

You need a good-quality 12-point 13mm socket, preferably new or nearly so. You can soak them in penetrating oil for a few days first.
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#3 Turbocharger

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Posted 19 August 2008 - 08:51 AM

Given you're saying they're stuck, I'm guessing the socket Jim mentions isn't working? Sadly because of where they are you can't get a grinder to them so I've had success with the 'bash a smaller socket on' method, ahead of taking the whole hub or swivel off to put it in the vice and drill it out.
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#4 JimAttrill

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Posted 19 August 2008 - 09:10 AM

To be quite honest, we never have trouble undoing the bolts because they are never rusted on up here. Possibly down at the coast they get rusty.

I assume you are at least going to change the caliper seals, so a bit of heat might make it easier. No, I take that back as I think there are o-rings between the two halves of the caliper which might be damaged. As with a lot of things, LR say you should not split the caliper, but I see no reason why you can't if you are careful and keep everything clean. I think forumeers have done it.
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#5 Robert Jan

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Posted 19 August 2008 - 09:29 AM

I have a fairly new set of Stahlwille tools, both sockets and spanners. There's no slipping whatsoever, there just isn't any movement at all.
A lot of oil to soften the dirt seems worth a try, but isn't it mainly stuck because it gets to endure so much force while braking?

Given you're saying they're stuck, I'm guessing the socket Jim mentions isn't working? Sadly because of where they are you can't get a grinder to them so I've had success with the 'bash a smaller socket on' method, ahead of taking the whole hub or swivel off to put it in the vice and drill it out.



#6 rusty_wingnut

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Posted 19 August 2008 - 10:11 AM

try a 1/2" AF 12 point socket (tighter fit than 13mm) and a good long breaker bar. cracked all eight of mine no sweat.

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#7 daveturnbull

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Posted 19 August 2008 - 11:49 AM

Snap on sockets always seem to grip better than anything else too - worth a shot.
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#8 jil6939

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Posted 19 August 2008 - 08:28 PM

I have a fairly new set of Stahlwille tools, both sockets and spanners. There's no slipping whatsoever, there just isn't any movement at all.
A lot of oil to soften the dirt seems worth a try, but isn't it mainly stuck because it gets to endure so much force while braking?

I think the clue here is the fact its not slipping. The answer is to pull harder! The bolts are normally held in by a spot of threadlock which you will need to overcome.Make sure you get a straight pull on it though with a good quality bit of kit as once rounded you are on your own. I would put as much effort into keeping the socket square on as i would in getting a longer leverage.Best of luck.

#9 101sean

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Posted 19 August 2008 - 08:58 PM

Yes, they will be loctited and are a fine thread so willl take a bit of starting.
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#10 roybatty666

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Posted 19 August 2008 - 09:44 PM

get a big breaker bar on it and a second person to pull/push the socket to keep it square on the nut

Also turn the wheel to full lock so you can get good access to the bolt and a straight pull on the breaker bar.

Some bolts are pigs, I sheared the end off my breaker bar the other day on a wheel bolt, I had the whole Land Rover bouncing on the tranny break to undo the blighter (on breaker bar number 2), using the momentum of the car rolling forwards against me pulling on the bar.
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#11 mmgemini

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Posted 20 August 2008 - 06:32 AM

Yes a breaker bar.
If you can hold the bar and hit the end with the socket on with a hammer.
Hit towards the bolt.

HTH

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#12 J@mes

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Posted 20 August 2008 - 06:48 AM

depending on how you are supporting the rest of the vehicle, you can always put a trolley jack under the breaker bar handle and then gently raise the jack. obviously keep an eye on the vehicle and make sure its not being lifted by the caliper bolt!

I expect the downward pressure of the vehicle and the upwarrd pressure of the jack will crack the bolt - its how i did the wheelnuts on my disco!
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#13 GBMUD

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Posted 20 August 2008 - 06:49 AM

Do be 100% sure you are pulling in the right direction! We have all made that error when working round the back of a component.

It is not best practice, and may void the tools warranty if they found out, but a bit of tube to extend the handle of the breaker bar can help hugely. As stated, decent tools, squarely on the bolt head and you will succeed.

Best of luck

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#14 Robert Jan

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Posted 20 August 2008 - 07:52 AM

Just to be sure; I assume the bolts are normal thread i.e. they tighten clockwise. The workshop manual doesn't mention it to be otherwise, but that is no guarantee.

Do be 100% sure you are pulling in the right direction! We have all made that error when working round the back of a component.

It is not best practice, and may void the tools warranty if they found out, but a bit of tube to extend the handle of the breaker bar can help hugely. As stated, decent tools, squarely on the bolt head and you will succeed.

Best of luck

Chris



#15 mmgemini

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Posted 20 August 2008 - 08:03 AM

They are indeed normal RH threads.
12mm X 1.25mm if my memory is correct. As yet I haven't found a subsitute to replace them with.

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#16 Happyoldgit

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Posted 20 August 2008 - 08:44 AM

As most people have said it sounds like you need more leverage.

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#17 soutie

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Posted 20 August 2008 - 09:10 AM

I tip I learnt from a gun smith was to use a spot of heat to break the loctite hold. He used to use a small gas burner to heat the screws up before he would unscrew them. Saved having to replace many a managed screw head.

#18 hoss1720

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Posted 20 August 2008 - 07:55 PM

you cant beat heat.

oxy-acetylene if you know someone with a set.

or just try a good old blow torch.Heat the head to a nice dull red and it will undo without a hitch
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#19 steve_a

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Posted 21 August 2008 - 04:00 PM

If you are thinking you are going to muller it, give the local dealer a phone call, since they may not have the bolts on the shelf, you may want to lay in some spares just in case if you need the motor on the road.

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#20 OilIT

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Posted 21 August 2008 - 04:47 PM

If you are thinking you are going to muller it, give the local dealer a phone call, since they may not have the bolts on the shelf, you may want to lay in some spares just in case if you need the motor on the road.

S


good point - When I found my caliper had only one bolt holding it on :o bearmach nor the local stealer had them in stock.
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