honitonhobbit

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honitonhobbit last won the day on April 26

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About honitonhobbit

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    Grumpy old fart
  • Birthday 02/21/1867

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    Auverland4x4
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    Sedgemoor Somerset

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  1. Had a look at a Seat Acetate (or something similar to that) this morning. Metallic White - threw me for a bit. But really well put together; lots of engine choices. Good ground clearance AND a round button thing for terrain types. 4 motion drive train as well. Fully loaded for 24k
  2. 1. Intake hole - yes and no. Some do and some don't. Doesn't seem to be a reason. More do than don't 2. I've yet to drive a 300 with a hybrid turbo or upgraded turbo that actually drives well across the range. Easy to tune for certain applications - low down grunt or mid range, or high range. I think the standard set up works the best for real world applications 3. I would suggest you buy a replacement cartridge kit off one of the more reputable eBay suppliers and build one up - or spend the money on a rebuilt turbo from one of the many reputable suppliers around the UK.
  3. Intake pipe pre turbo? That would be oil form the sump breather oil condenser - post turbo pipe would be a possible sign of turbo seals (but not necessarily) Recon engine - do you mean Gold Seal or an engine that someone has sold as recon? Was the turbo replaced at this time? Ram effect on a snorkel is negligible - overcome by all the bends and restrictions Most 300TDi's had a catalytic converter As I said before, a straight through pipe will cause excess scavenge. put a back box on
  4. Very nice. Quality stands out, even in a photograph. I'm liking the homage to retro in the KC lighting covers. I do like a jeep based buggy. the lines work better For me the early days of challenge were more interesting. I did like the 'up to the arm pit sin mud' stuff. I liked the minimalist prep on the vehicles, the enormous amount of skill and effort to negotiate what would now be seen as an event car park. The lack of serious injuries despite using more dangerous kit - simply because common sense was more available from all sides. But I came in from RTV; the ultimate in driving skill and minimalism As for Ultra - to me the skill is in building the machine so it is fast and survives. I did that with comp safari for years. I was single and well paid then. If I still was, then I'd still do it. It's not a spectators sport either. I don't see the point in not having spectators - they are where the big money is
  5. My apologies, I wrote the above, then went out on site, feeling I needed to say more, but without the time to do so. As I have mentioned before, I know RED well. I've been close to the development of all their winch products from about a year in. So I keep a close eye on sales and product placement. The international side of the their market has taken off in the last couple of years. They've broken the American market - always tough thanks to Warn. The chaps down under seem to be happy. Europe is content, as is the former USSR and South America, as well as Asia. Where there is the money to buy the product it is sold. They have also captured the commercial market - something GP have not done. It's worth remembering that although 'Racing' events like the King Series, and the various other modern spawn of Challenge events are now well entrenched internationally, its still a tiny market; with a teeny weeny hierarchy of those with more money than MacDonald's, a middle class of those with some disposable and lower class of those with sod all money but a lot of time and skill. It would be interesting to know actual figures. GP stuff has for the most part been troublesome since it's first outing. Much like a Capri with a Turbo Technics lump attached. An antiquated design, relatively poorly and cheaply made, with far too much power. RED are diametrically opposite. Designed from scratch by a company with R&D capability and budget, with in house machining. Reliability was never an option. Some bits were complex but the parts back up was (and still is) exceptional. International sales were easier as RED are working for big clients all over the universe. I would like to see the figure or who starts GP and moves to RED and visa versa; backed up with the why reasons. In my opinion and it is only my opinion, you are looking at two totally different companies, providing two totally different options of a small machine used to move vehicles about when they are stuck. As I said before, I know where my money would go - but for me that is a dream, spending that much money on a machine to move a stuck vehicle, would for me, be rash and stupid. I need to feed my kids and pay my mortgage; there are many perfectly good 'machines for moving stuck vehicles' on the market and loads of really good ones that people throw away but can be fixed for pennies. I will admit I find Challenge and it's spawn boring. Ultra 4 more so. It fails to excite me in any way, although I am impressed at the build of many of the vehicles (even if they don't comply to the regs!)
  6. Interesting observation. I'd say it's slightly off the mark. But on the resale value, I'd wholeheartedly agree.
  7. A straight through exhaust is an excellent way to lunch the turbo seals - too much scavenge; end up 'pulling oil through First suggestion is; are you sure it's the turbo. Valve stem seals will do the same Read Daan's intercooler stuff EGR and DPF/CAT are age dependant on legality to remove - look it up on Google You can buy a new turbo cartridge and fit yourself You have already said it runs as sweet as a nut. Chucking a hybrid turbo on a 200k engine will simple bring it's demise forward. I would check it is the turbo and not the stem seals. If it is the stems, then have the head reconned and then refit it, leaving the rest of the engine well enough alone. A standard 300tdi in either auto or manual form is fine for pretty much anything
  8. No 'hate' here - known Jim since he was not long out of short trousers. Put him through his Lantra Off Road Driving and Winching tickets (yes he did pass, just). Not knocking his product or his drive. Used both GP and Red AND used them to instruct safe winching techniques. Know Neal Jones well (RED's owner) - I go back to when they first got into winches; designing them for the Supercat Coyote and Jackal, to replace the MileMarker. Simple fact is that RED produce better stuff and are more professional with customer support. Also would say, there is more thought in the products. The new motor is simply there way of doing stuff 'in house'. Not surprising really as they are an international engineering design and fabrication company working for some of the biggest names in the business...
  9. Allowing that no manufacturer of winches produces accurate, useable figures I doubt it. Maybe 100 JM's? Speed and stall weight are doable. RED have produced accurate draw figures for their new motor
  10. I wonder why...
  11. Have you seen a DS parked next to a BMW mini?
  12. I'm really falling for the Disco Sport. The more I see, the more I like. But the D5 is as you say 'ill proportioned' and 'incoherent'
  13. Never used them - heard a mixed bag of good and bad. Heard worse about Paddocks I buy from my local vendor, as do a number of my friends from foreign climes. The vendor has an eBay site and can use various parcel delivery systems internationally In the old days, Richard James Land Rovers in Avonmouth shipped stuff all over the world, to the remotest places; like Pitcairn and Bog Monsters Gaff. Now they are an international shipping company
  14. I get the feeling it's not head to head anymore. RED dominated the Hammers after Warn fitments. They are selling all over the world in big numbers. Most importantly, they look nice
  15. You Sir, are a star! I had the same issue as Matt