renault4

oil filter wrench?

25 posts in this topic

can anyone recomend an oil filter wrench/spanner /socket for a defender 90?

I have one that is like a piece of chain with a socket on the end which works fine on other cars where

access is not such a problem, but on a defender?.

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I've got a very cheap bike chain thingy with a pressed steel handle. I had no problem getting my filter off. Also use it to hold the shocks tight while undoing and doing up the nuts :)

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^^^ yep, that's what I use as a last resort and not failed me yet, excellent piece of kit. IIRC mine came from halfords.

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I have the chain type and have used it for years - even on defenders. The TD5 would be better off with the strap type though as the filter is very rogue trooper tight :P

Les :)

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I have one of these works really well

http://www.screwfix.com/search.do;jsession...mp;x=10&y=2

you can get a very similar one from Machine mart as well

I've often wondered if they worked.

I have the old chain on a lever thing that generally tears the filter can apart before it loosens it. It was as useful as stabbing the can with a screwdiver and then levering it off.

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I don't use one, I just grab it tightly & unscrew the filter by hand.

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i've got one like the screwfix one... works brilliantly, the more force you put on it, the tighter it gets.... it'll crush the can rather than slip...

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I don't use one, I just grab it tightly & unscrew the filter by hand.

Ralph,

were you a professional wrestler by the name Killer Karl Krup who's finishing move was "The Claw"

He had the claw of death!

LOL :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Seriously,

I use the same tool as ChrisV8, works perfectly gripping firmly releasing the seal directly.

Cheers,

Todd.

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Ralph,

were you a professional wrestler by the name Killer Karl Krup who's finishing move was "The Claw"

He had the claw of death!

LOL :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Seriously,

I use the same tool as ChrisV8, works perfectly gripping firmly releasing the seal directly.

Cheers,

Todd.

We use the strap type wrench on the buses we service. I have a Sykes Pickavant now, the second wrench I have had since the seventys. A filter on a new cumins engine broke my first one two years ago, that was strap wrench grunt bar and a peice of tube on the handle. We fitted a filter head comple asuming the Yanks had thread locked the old one on. :angry:

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Ralph,

were you a professional wrestler by the name Killer Karl Krup who's finishing move was "The Claw"

He had the claw of death!

LOL :lol::lol::lol::lol:

Seriously,

I use the same tool as ChrisV8, works perfectly gripping firmly releasing the seal directly.

Cheers,

Todd.

I've a fairly good grip & when fitting the oil filter I just smear the seal with a film of engine oil & tighten the filter by hand.

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I've a fairly good grip & when fitting the oil filter I just smear the seal with a film of engine oil & tighten the filter by hand.

Tried all the above^^^^^

Now I just use a set of plier type grips from Halfords £10 IIRC cant be faulted.

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another way of removing the filter that i have used is by wrapping a long length of rope around the filter so that when i pull on it, the rope tightens and unscrews the filter. if you have the first few layers of the rope overlapping it makes sure that it doesnt slip.

HTH

Tris

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I have used chain wrenches and strap wrenches in the past and binned them all. The first LR I worked on with a spin on canister was a 2.5 TD. There is so little room to move a wrench, the strap stretched too much and I ran out of space, the chain wrench just chewed the filter up - big mess. My favoured tool became a Sykes Pickavant tool bought in Halfords, it's similar to the Screwfix item mentioned above and has never failed to move a filter, without wrecking it in the process.

Having said this I have never need a wrench for a V8 filter due to it being so easily accesible to both hands.

Michael

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I don't use one, I just grab it tightly & unscrew the filter by hand.

:blink: I am with Western on that. I do use the "Grab-and-hold-your-breath-while-wrenching-til-it-gives-up" method and it works well with me.. ( Haven't been a wrestler nor a strangler :huh: )

Real men do the wrenching method aintdatright? ;)

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It's only fitted "hand tight" if you cant remove it by hand the screwdriver / hamer method works well, a bit messy and please be aware of the temperature of your engine oil.

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I've a fairly good grip & when fitting the oil filter I just smear the seal with a film of engine oil & tighten the filter by hand.

How do you manage to get your hands in there...In fact how do you manage to reach the damn thing....

I'm seriously thinking og going remote for mine.....

mike

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I get under the vehicle & slip a plastic bag over the filter then reach up & undo it.

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Don't try the screwdriver and hammer trick on a TD5 filter, one of our mechanics did that and poked a hole through the rather weak (but expensive) housing on the side of the block. Now they have been told that if it won't come off with the chain wrench we have, to rather leave it alone and tell us about it instead. They don't have to be changed very often anyway.

I use a cheepo strap wrench on my Tdi filter - just to loosen it, not to do it up. I occasionally break one when I use it for a purpose that it was not intended for, like turning the propshafts or other silly ideas I get.

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After several laughable, and very messy, fiascos I ended getting a 50mm wide rubber strap thingy where the strap wraps round the filter and then back into a slot in the red handle that grips it. Found it to be excellent but cannot remember what it is called. I have found it to be good for also loosening other things where spanners or sockets are not appropriate.

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I was introduced to the puckka Lisle handled strap wrench (check if that is the right size for yours) as an apprentice. They were either from Mssrs SnapOn or Britool vans for about a tenner each.

Made in the USA where men wind on oil filters with spanners, I've never known it fail.

I have two sizes and as they hinge in two directions you can use it anywhere you can get a hand to.

53200L.GIF

So long as you've got the right size, the harder you pull, the tighter it grips.

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I was introduced to the puckka Lisle handled strap wrench (check if that is the right size for yours) as an apprentice. They were either from Mssrs SnapOn or Britool vans for about a tenner each.

Made in the USA where men wind on oil filters with spanners, I've never known it fail.

I have two sizes and as they hinge in two directions you can use it anywhere you can get a hand to.

53200L.GIF

So long as you've got the right size, the harder you pull, the tighter it grips.

I used this on my Ford Fiesta but I think on the td5110 99 mod it works quite well by wrenching it hard...... Mine is made in China and it serves the purpose well.... :lol:

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