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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/25/2019 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    These days there's no such thing as a cheap Defender - an old Disco or RR is as capable and half the price, but you'd better own a set of spanners and a sense of humour. And probably a welder.
  2. 3 points
    Whereas I'm sure a standard 110 on similar road tyres would've gotten much further
  3. 3 points
  4. 3 points
    Bit overdue for an update... I decided that the only way forward to keep the lot together it to thread the ends of the shaft and make some nuts. I've never actually done any thread cutting in the lathe, so no time like the present! The bar, in all honesty, is a little big for my little ML10 lathe, but you gotta pee with the pecker you got: I also didn't have the correct change gears to be able to cut a metric thread (my lathe has an imperial leadscrew), so it's a person I'm not that keen on thread of 35mm x 16tpi Luckily 35mm is a nats nadger from 1"3/8, so let's call it that... I'm afraid I was concentrating on not stuffing it all up and not taking photos, so there aren't many. The results aren't half bad if I do say so myself: There's a big nut on top of the bollard and a slimmer nut under the gearbox. The large nut at the top takes a little ali extension to retain the top cap. It's sat proud on a spacer ring so it's accessible with a spanner, rather than being sunken and needing a huge socket: I machined up a nice little bolt to finish the capping off: I finally got the fairlead finished too. This took some head scratching to design something that would support the sides whilst allowing the roller to turn. I opted for a piece of pipe with machined cast iron caps which gets tensioned by a piece of M12 threaded rod running through the whole assembly. Phosphor bronze bushes are a press fit into the CDS pipe the roller is made of. I like simple and rugged, and PB on cast is hard to beat: Again, I was concentrating on the job, not taking photos. Sorry. The protector ring which sits under the bollard was too tall. My ghetto solution. Ahem: And applied paint liberally: Fitted up: And that's the point I realised I forgot the add the motor to gearbox adaptor supports. Ho hum. That's where we're at; seems like the never ending project! TTFN PS: sexy capstan rope arrived while I was on my travels in France:
  5. 3 points
  6. 3 points
    By the time Ross has finished his, we won't have any need for off-roaders, we'll all be using flying cars.
  7. 3 points
    PS - I'll be putting a full explanation of the construction and all the messing about on the original build thread for the roof so its all in the one place, with lots of pictures, well except for pictures of the 10 foot sheets that unfortunately 'escaped' from the pallet I built on the roof to bring them back from Glasgow. Despite my meticulous planning the wind got under the middle and lifted causing the front edge to escape pulling off the second wooden cross strap holding them down and the three sheets folded over 3/4 of the way to the back at the next cross strap and ended up banging on the road behind me (A82 Gt Western Road!)!! A hasty reattachment was required and taking photos was low on the list of priorities! The wind was blowing, the sheets were so buckled I could not get them back onto the pallet so had to dismantle and rebuild it on the verge with the sheets turned over. (Then I had to go back and buy another three sheets!) The ally suppliers were very amused when I went back, but having watched me spend 30 minutes screwing it all down on the roof before I left them were surprised I was so unfortunate! Guy who helped me said a few days earlier a lad turned up to collect an 8x4 ft 3mm ally sheet, with a Nissan Micra, they watched him put it on the roof, windows open, and several bungees wrapped over it. He was intending going 60 miles with it! They refused to let him leave the premises with it, and he was really Mildly miffed off!
  8. 2 points
    Do we really care ? I, for one, will not buy one. Doing between 40,000 - 50,000 miles a year, D3, D4 and the various RR's were discounted on cost, reputation etc. To meet all sorts of standards, this model will be another computer on wheels and made not to be worked on by the owners..
  9. 2 points
    Thanks for posting, I couldn't bring myself to do it. I still think there's an elaborate hoax going on.
  10. 2 points
    You won’t go far wrong with bog standard Land Rover springs and shocks. Not too expensive (when you consider how long they last) and will do the job. Ideal for your usage as well. To be honest a clean up with a wire brush and some paint would probably have them looking fine as I doubt they’ve actually sagged at all.
  11. 2 points
    With JVC having launched a mech-less double din head unit and the reviews being quite good, I decided it was time to bite the bullet and see if we couldn't make it fit into the 90.... Pull the dash apart to reveal dust from various parts of Europe.... Then set to some hacking.... The insert section was always a poor fit, so I decided to use some clear Gorilla Glue I had in the cupboard to bond it in... One edge sat proud so clamped overnight.... Some filling and hacking later..... I decided to fill the recess to sit the unit on the surface of the dash, mainly because I couldn't figure out how to make a recessed landing point to match the original.... The insert was still quite proud so that needed leveling with the DA sander. Quite a few fills and hacks later, using my favorite tool..... Time to key the paint and get a cover of colour back onto the panel... Problem..... Gorilla Glue reacted with the paint.... So.. Leave it all to dry, hack out the bad stuff and decide the only course of action is to fill the gap with the bad glue... While that was drying, a few wires to sort in the truck and a quick test run.... Then back in for some more sanding..... And a little while later after general 1000 grit smoothing... More paint... It's not perfect, but a few more coats on from this picture most of the little pits have been filled and it's looking ok. I plan to leave it to cure for a few days now and get the compressed air into the dash area, clean out some dust and add more lightness....
  12. 2 points
    If only! There’s all sorts in the workshop, but she is liquified natural gas carrier currently off Argentina. Got it going with some high flash point solvent spray I had in the shed, stripped it down, literally sprayed it everywhere and then blew it with the air. Works fine now.
  13. 2 points
    I've always enjoyed punting an old Land Rover down a winding road but this (pretty cool) video confirms my worst fears. That thing corners way too flat! In truth, it's a road car, which gets extra ground clearance for off-road use by making the suspension stiffer and LESS supple - then fixes everything using electronics and brakes. We all knew that was going to happen though. As the argument on the previous pages shows... Ah well, I'm not the target market anyway. Too poor.
  14. 2 points
    Was just looking back through old posts. For completeness sake the problem was that 1 of the front wheels was pretty much down to 3mm of tread, the other side was as around 15mm.. May be exaggerating the depths, but the considerable difference on tyre size made braking and bumpy roads interesting. 2 new front tyres and it drove like a 'proper' car! Thanks for the help guys
  15. 2 points
    So an acquaintance (ironically who I sold my TDV8 to) passed away recently and a mutual friend has asked if I'm interested in buying his 6x6. I thought it was a diy build but turns out it's one of the elusive Sandringham 6x6s albeit not completely original. Currently it's got a 2.8 Nissan straight 6 diesel in it and an exhaust stack behind the cab which apparently sounds incredible (will hopefully be seeing it tomorrow). The chassis is very solid and had an mot last year but oil pressure issues and surplus of vehicles meant it wasn't back on the road. Now it has a strange appeal to me and being a flatbed with pickup and 2 tonne payload makes it quite tempting for my new place in the country. I also have sat at the new place an externally rough P38 with a good 4.6 in it and after the crank escapades a spare (albeit missing cranks) 1.5x 300Tdis and a friend with whom I may experiment with converting one to a 2.8TGV spec. Question is what do people think it's worth? I have my ideas but curious what others think. There is also a crane, pto compressor and generator on the cars so could turn it into quite a handy little tool. And because pics are obligatory
  16. 2 points
    Yes Ross. Read out messages etc and mirror nav apps like Waze and Google maps. Less distraction or temptation to read messages etc. Don’t worry... They will be smaller and higher spec when your 90 needs one
  17. 2 points
    If the ignition light blows the alternator won't charge as the light is part of the charging circuit. Also check the brushes.
  18. 2 points
    I am abit late to the party and i'm glad you came up with a good solution which worked I thought i would point out this little gem i came across not so long ago, it's a 500lb winch which works off a cordless drill. Having lots of these drills about and various dodgy body parts, i find it a doddle to move stuff about https://www.amazon.co.uk/Portable-500lb-Electric-Powered-Winch/dp/B07P7GH29G/ref=asc_df_B07P7GH29G/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=310855477562&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=1694740625808202929&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1006978&hvtargid=pla-701276682937&psc=1
  19. 2 points
    I'd suggest you're more likely to cause problems by not disconnecting them - an ECU that's forgotten its settings is an easier fix than one that's caught fire
  20. 2 points
    People bolt guards all over Defenders and other vehicles (including Toyotas and Nissans) to protect vulnerable parts but they didn't think to move or protect the compressor? That's operator error surely. A dodgy brake light switch shouldn't be an issue, just wire the thing out. A D3 is a complex luxury vehicle not a tractor, I'd think twice before overlanding one just as I would a BMW or Lexus 4x4, and certainly would want to take the best diagnostics kit I could get. Also, as Elbekko has pointed out, air suspension is fundamentally simple - 4 bags full of compressed air - a problem easily solved with a tyre compressor. Again, failing to have any sort of backup provision for that seems very ill-prepared. Enough people break springs or shocks when overlanding I don't see why EAS should be singled out for blame. Carrying a spare air-bag folded up sounds easier than carrying a coil spring to me too. Who remembers Charlie Boorman's Dakar series where they used a BMW X5 as support and had to fly out a BMW tech with a tablet gaffa-taped to the back of the seat just to keep the thing running? Or perhaps Tom Sheppard's G-Wagen having to limp all the way back from the desert to Mercedes HQ for what turned out to be a minor electrical issue? As for VW vans - they are doing what people are accusing LR of doing - trading on image/nostalgia to sell a luxury version of a utility vehicle for waaay over the odds and they're not even that reliable as others have pointed out. A friend of mine worked on "trying to make the gearboxes hold together" The camper versions are over 50k and the high-end have all the bells & whistles you'd find in a luxury saloon, it's as if that's what the market wants these days
  21. 2 points
    Gerry doesn't hear you. Gerry doesn't care. Big wheels. Chrome. Marketing. Twin tail pipes (square ones). That's what is required.
  22. 1 point
    Yes, 'cos the wheels would still have been on the ground Everything I have seen in recent years appears to be engineered to work on a test track to sell a car, not in the real world when you start using it and want to use it every day. But that's sort of been the problem with all the recent models, they are very nice when they work. The last bit is the sticky area. Bong bong bong.............
  23. 1 point
    I think my main point , is that it is mostly a post 200tdi phenomenon, with the external wing vent, that allows simple 'bolt on ' cool, whether the system is sealed or not. Pre 200 tdi, and you 'really' had to want to fit one, as it meant cutting the body, or a very expensive custom jobbie.
  24. 1 point
    Exactly the same happened to me earlier this year - and interestingly - the reservoir failed in exactly the same place. I wonder if it’s UV breakdown with light coming through the bonnet gap? I was using the drivers side wheel for pressure. As I bent Down and connected the hose, the crack in the res squirted a jet of fresh brake fluid in my face. I already had an eye infection. So wasn’t best pleased.
  25. 1 point
    The thin wire (brown with yellow stripe, if I recall correctly) should only be live when the ignition is on. The bigger brown wires should be permanently live as they run straight to the battery. The small brown wire is what excites the coils in the alternator when the ignition is on, and will take some current drain if the ign is on but the alternator is not producing charge. The dash warning light is in that wire's circuit, so when the ign is "earthing" to the coils, the light illuminates. Once the alternator provides charge, it will produce a 14v charge on that wire trying to reverse the current, but as the batteries and ignition switch will also be at 14v through the battery charging wires, there is no potential difference across the bulb and no current in that wire. The large wires will be at 12v with the alternator giving no charge, but they will not have current in a healthy alternator as the circuit is controlled by the diode pack on the back of the alternator. Once the alternator is providing charge, the wires will be fed in the other direction through the diodes and will have 14v. If you remove the plug from the alternator and still have a light when the ign is on, then there is a short between the small wire between the bulb and alternator plug. If you got no light, then try removing the plug and shorting the small wire to a good earth - with the ign off, there should be no light, but it should come on immediately if you short it to the battery -ve or a good earth. Check the condition of the big wires to make sure they have no shorts and the terminals are clean. If that is all good, then there is no reason a new alternator should blow unless you have a bad battery.


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