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Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/20/2019 in Posts

  1. 6 points
    Right now, somewhere in Solihull, somebody in a big flouncy shirt is going into meltdown and shouting "WHY DIDN'T WE THINK OF THAT!!!"
  2. 4 points
    Well the transfer box replacement hasn't been entirely smooth, Smooth being the operative word. After I changed the box I noticed a vibration between 40 and 50 mph. At first I thought uj but on further investigation I spotted an oscillation on the hand brake drum. Tonight I stripped it out and put a clock on the rear out put flange, sure enough something isn't right. Turns out the output shaft is bent, Lord knows how . Yes you can get the shaft out with the box in the car and no I probably shouldn't of done what I have. I didn't have time to strip the other box and I don't really want to in case this one fails. So out with some vee blocks and the clock, yep it's definitely bent. Of coarse I didn't mark the high spot and put it in my press I wouldn't do that would I . Anyway it's back together now and I'll test drive it on my way to work in the morning. Mike
  3. 3 points
  4. 3 points
    I feel it's one of my special skills, however I think this is cause by the vast amount of waiting we are doing in anticipation of the new defender. It's like an automotive brexit
  5. 3 points
    Stop running it on vegetable oil then it won't feel any different running on diesel 😆 Mo
  6. 3 points
    Just thinking about the explosion, and if you are far enough away in Didcot? Please change it, carefully, as I'm visiting Oxfordshire next weekend. G.
  7. 2 points
    It's very unfortunate and misleading. The subtitles suggest the new car builds on the heritage of the others, when, in reality, it completely abandons every design feature of the old, bar the fact it has a four wheel drive system and possibly a Land Rover badge. I am generally positive about the new vehicle but hate bull droppings of this type! Not much ground clearance in this video either...
  8. 2 points
    Quite a while back on one of my mog axle posts somebody said the above title so here goes Started a project this weekend that I have been considering for a while elements of this are often carried by landrovers in the country ie game keepers but ultimately putting fabrication skills to the test Mods if you are not happy please remove and accept my apologies for posting So the project is to make a standard shotgun lamp Some of the bits cut pieces shaped shaping finished welding up and blending All put together and where I'm at now Going to fab a cartridge belt as part of the stand then buy a suitable lamp shade to finish hope to be complete by the end of next weekend Regards Stephen
  9. 2 points
    Sort of... There's plenty of "Ultra 4 vs Rock Bouncer videos" but they're all time-based competitions. I know the Ultra4 guys don't air down and run more "all-terrain" biased tyres due to the mixed racing they do and instead prefer to throw power and speed at the problem. What I'd be more curious is seeing them on, I suppose, would be more along the lines of what we might see in the UK - a mix of bogs, (thinking Highlands ), mud, rocks, grass etc. but rather than throw power into the equation follow the Green Lane Code and tread lightly so to speak. I.e. eliminate the huge (and admittedly fun) HP and speed figures and try and complete a course with minimal wheel spin and damage underneath. That should tell us a little more about the actual capabilities of the vehicle, momentum and speed can overcome a lot of shortcomings. I mean the Norwegian Army wanted to learn to fly and they didn't have any planes - so momentum and speed helped out here
  10. 2 points
    i just searched companies house for a landrover garage that had recently gone bust and errrm, invented a receipt from them
  11. 2 points
    Something has changed Nige..... I can read your post and understand it first go! Maybe the forum has a new state of the art spell checker!
  12. 2 points
    You speak better English than most that live here. Mike
  13. 1 point
    Jeebus Bowie, you've gotta warn us before posting graphic violence against common decency like that! I threw up in my mouth a bit before I managed to scroll past the horror
  14. 1 point
  15. 1 point
    Made and fitted the brake pipes yesterday inc bled the brakes as well, oh and here are a couple of night pic's
  16. 1 point
    I Brought some of these last time I ordered some parts from them https://www.shop4autoparts.net/tools/workshop/37301-Grippaz-Gloves-Large-Box-of-50/ and I found them the best I’ve used they’re not tight , I’ve even taken them off and then put them back on again and they’re quite thick . They do larger and smaller sizes as well .
  17. 1 point
    I use copper grease. It has always worked so far, but there may be better alternatives. I thought the copper would continue to act as a lubricant and rust inhibitor after the grease died out, hence not using moly. Graphite grease should do the same.
  18. 1 point
  19. 1 point
    Love the cars ! From the days when there was automotive styling 😊 Mo
  20. 1 point
    Hi Everyone Time for a bunch of pics from my refurb and winch install onto my series 3. So i managed to bag a bargain off ebay, and this is how it arrived. So time for a strip down and see what it needed, as its had a hard life on the rear of a recovery truck from what i could find out. It was not in a such a bad shape, worn brushes, and lots of grime and neglect. I started off by ordering new brushes After some prep i had the whole thing painted in Grey, plus some new gaskets and plastic cover from the UK Got the commutator polished and started reassembly. Old VS New brushes. Fully assembled back to its glory Than it was time to start the Fabrication for a new bumper to accommodate the winch. I was lucky enough that the sale of winch had the winch plate included (had it blasted), so i incorporated that into my build. Now i wanted a specific style of bumper which was mounted higher than standard and looked more or less like what i had before ( standardish looking) . So went out and got some RHS........ and started mocking things up. To save on fab time i decided to use my old bumper as a doner for the chassis mounts (easier i thought at that time) and grafted them onto the RHS......... Next a quick check that it looked ok....... So i got some 3mm plate and doubled up the top and bottoms, tieing in the the old bumper mounts, its a lot of welding but the result was pretty pleasing. I then added some gussets at the old bumper mounts to make sure it will not go anywhere Than it was the light bars turn to be fitted, since i always liked the shape it was in, and its been on the vehicle trough the 3 bumpers i thought it was only appropriate that it gets reused. Its than off to the galvanizers for that series look............... So next was vehicle fitting............ i already had an extra X member right at the front at the dumb irons, so i added some more Gussets at the corners. And finally mounting the whole lot back onto the Landy.............. This is where i am the moment, next is wiring the winch up with an aftermarket winch control box. Than time for a new synth rope. Hope you all find it interesting, sorry for the long pic heavy post................ Regards Grem
  21. 1 point
  22. 1 point
    Its just cold rolled blocks very carefully marked up, drilled, tapped and held together with high tensile bolts. The bottom die got drilled through, then the middle section milled out exposing part of the hole. A piece of rod fills the space, leaving about a third of it exposed to create the shape in the part. The top die has a corresponding semi circular groove milled in it.
  23. 1 point
    I think they look better than 8 spokes would - it’s looking good.
  24. 1 point
    Quick, fix the spare one before the next thing goes wrong!
  25. 1 point
    Does the FL2 have air suspension? / Did yours? That's the crucial bit with the Terrain Response that LR developed, it mimics a solid axle through the use of those cross-link valves (not something I'd heard of on the FL2). Having said that for basically a glorified shopping trolley the FL2 did remarkably well and it was more your (understandable) desire not to trash it that hindered it's progress. It was the same reason why I stopped using the RR for laning trips it was just a little too nice and I didn't / don't have enough disposable income to justify trashing it. Whereas I feel perfectly justified in doing that to the Defender. The major advantage for me on the Defender is that the same basic design has been around for so long that you can build a vehicle from the ground up on new parts quite easily as there are so many after market suppliers. Hence parts can be sourced readily and at a variety of price points. Case in point - I had the RR for about 4 years and it cost me roughly the same as my Defender has over 9 (except that the Defender has had a new gearbox, transfer box, two new axles with Ashcroft internals / pegged lockers (courtesy of @Hybrid_From_Hell), two engine rebuilds (oops ), two sets of BFG KM2s and two sets of wheels over the course of 130k miles. I'd be curious to see how a vehicle setup for pure off-road such as Shannon Campbell's Dragon Slayer (see below) compares on technical off-roading vs. a similar vehicle with no IFS. I know he switched to IFS due to the large gains he could make on the high-speed sections. He was willing to compromise the rock-crawling sections of KoH because he could make up so much time in the fast desert sections. I seem to remember a question posed to him or someone else running an IFS car about not airing down to which the response was it's not worth the time taking to air down and back up when you can chuck 800 horses at the problem . Mind you I don't think he falls into the category of an amateur driver having been the first person (and one of two) to win KoH three times. Awww shucks
  26. 1 point
    It is possible that even though you re did the bearings that they may have been tightened too much and has caused them to fail prematurely. This happened on my Defender once and they failed about a week after using it. Took the stub axles with them too. I would definitely take the outer flange off and have a look inside just to be sure.
  27. 1 point
    I’d say keep the Series - for a start, they get stolen less frequently, but most agree they have more character too. You can do a lot to improve daily use, both economically and for comfort. Road biased tyres don’t look great on them, but they will considerably improve fuel economy, handling, noise and safety over aggressive off road tyres, and even moderate ATs. A careful tune up will reap rewards, but electronic ignition like Megajolt and fuel injection will make a huge difference. An LPG conversion will also allow much cheaper fuel (and I think it may help on road fund, but that is another benefit of the Series, which will be tax exempt sooner than a 90). Forget free wheeling hubs - they don’t do anything but cause trouble, but 7.50 tyres in place of 6.00s or 6.50s will help, as could an overdrive (in the long run, but they’re expensive). High ratio transfer box may be worth considering if your engine has the performance to pull it (tuning or the electronics would be needed). 90s have cheaper fuel bills for now due to their (predominantly) Diesel engines having better mpg, but I have concerns that the current political backlash against diesel that is already seeing city bans and surcharges will get worse and will bring extra taxes to make them economically unviable and force us into small petrol cars or EVs. For comfort, parabolic springs, Defender seats, inertia reel seat belts and better door seals do a lot to improve the commute. Overhauling the heater system brings big improvements to cab temperature, and you’ll see that expensive replacements or additional heaters aren’t necessary. Heated screens and mirrors are great, though, and aren’t terribly expensive. If you want a pretty, tough and quiet cab, then the Wright Off Road mat works well, but you can do something effective for less if the budget is too short.
  28. 1 point
    Thanks Steve, that's a great suggestion. I'll make some calls tomorrow and update the thread as things progress. Yep, trying to do it all properly. Enough cowboy parts around in the Land Rover world, so actual quality is a unique selling point. SimonR is a bit of an inspiration. I'll be very happy if I can be half as successful! Some bits I've been working on, if anyone is interested:
  29. 1 point
    Started refurbing the springs separated them first cleaned them up undercoated painted and finally back together regards Stephen
  30. 1 point
    @T0M Firstly welcome to the forums, you are in the right place to get this sorted. The diagram that you have shared looks to be the full colour version of the diagrams posted by PaulMC earlier in this topic. Those diagrams have a legend showing warning light functions, and wire colours, so by cross referencing with what you already have it should make a bit more sense. If you are still stuck, I still have a 200TDI vehicle sat here for reference, and I am sure we can get you new looms all plugged in correctly. Please feel free to post any farther questions here. Hope this helps, and apologies for the late reply, Hippo.
  31. 1 point
    enough engine oil in the intake will give black smoke although it usually happens just once .... It does sound like fuelling issues at both ends of the scale - no power or smoke , too little fuel and lots of dark smoke , way too much fuel . Still somewhat puzzling bearing in mind the checks/changes you have done cheers Steve b
  32. 1 point
    I’d also add that making a car comfortable enough that it allows the driver to exceed safe or mechanically sympathetic speeds on bad roads is at best unwise.
  33. 1 point
    If you look at the recent (modern) vehicles Land Rover have produced with air suspension you'll see that that is not the case. For example on the L322 when you enable the Terrain Response system it will automatically open up cross-link valves between the air bags. This means that as one wheel gets pushed up the opposite wheels get pushed down as air flows between the bags. I.e. what happens on a solid axle setup. The bonus being that when you disable the system then it goes back to being fully independent suspension which is far superior for road handling. As to the limitations of travel on the suspension I think it was @Retroanaconda following me on a laning trip in the Lake District. We were going up a climb and the rear wheel kept dropping and dropping way further than a standard Defender setup would do. Once the suspension actually drooped out then the vehicle simply stopped bothering applying power to that wheel, every so often you could see it apply a bit of power and the moment it detected some traction and something under the wheel it applied power back to that wheel. I still own my Defender but sold the L322 a while back because I didn't really have the space for it (ironically I do now) but in standard setup the L322 knocks the socks off a Defender on the road and in the vast majority of situations off-road too, the main fallacies of it are tyres, width and weight. When I started taking my Range Rover off-road there were basically no options for an all-terrain tyre in 18 or 19". Fast forward 7 years and there's now a lot of options, so whilst they may not have the height of the side-wall the main gripe I had with the tyres was lack of side-wall protection - they were essentially road tyres with a chunky tread. Now BFG and Cooper are all manufacturing tyres with stronger sidewalls in these kinds of tyre sizes. Having the lower sidewall will be more pleasant most of the time on the road and then traction control / suspension designs will likely compensate when you go off-road (i.e. you won't need such a large sidewall because with the traction control you won't need to air down as much). If we move onto weight then you can see with the L322 -> L405 that Land Rover have done large leaps on that front shaving off almost half a tonne so now an L405 with all it's leather seats, 4.4l engine, air conditioning, infotainment, massaging seats etc is not far off what a 110 weighs. I wouldn't be surprised if the new Defender is lighter than the old. Now if you look at the width then the only major downside with this is that most tracks in GB (green-lanes, pay and play etc) are predominantly carved out by vehicles with Defender track widths. However for the vast majority of stuff the extra width will be more useful (more spacious cabin despite the sound deadening, insulation etc). I know I'm always peed off by the fact that a station wagon Defender's back-door is not full width, the saving grace is a Defender is a box so you can always pack a surprising amount of stuff in. If you're going off-road then I'd argue that unless you're always in narrow tracks then the extra width is a great stability boost. A simple comparison - Defender at ~70", the L322 and L405 are ~80" but then if you look at what is arguably one of the most capable off-road vehicles in the world (Shannon Campbell's Dragon Slayer) then that has been designed with an close to 90" track. So I wouldn't go knocking the extra width, after winning KoH three times I suspect Shannon know's a thing or two about building a capable off-road vehicle.
  34. 1 point
    Removed the indicator dash light and the problem is resolved. I've ordered one of the BoB modded ones so hopefully that resolves the issue. Cheers Western
  35. 1 point
    It's odd 'cos the 2.2TDCi in my jag goes like stink, but it's carrying a lot less weight and isn't shaped like a brick
  36. 1 point
    Came across these recently: https://vwspeedshop.com/product.php?productid=16854&cat=395&page=1 Solves a whole lot of problems all in one swoop.
  37. 1 point
    Yep, most if not all BFGs and quite a lot of other 4x4 tyres from big brands have a modest side and gauche side.😉
  38. 1 point
    There was a little bit of tongue in cheek for those that have been refusing to remove there rose tinted glasses
  39. 1 point
  40. 1 point
    Wow that's terrifying, I would be worried about sneezing loudly near that never mind driving it about town
  41. 1 point
    Back at the work workshop, stayed late one night and finished the base No pretty welds on this one lol we fix trenching gear here so the lightest welding wire was 1.2mm trying to weld galv sheet metal with that wasn't pretty I had the welder wound down that low it was stuggling to strike and I still played chase the hole.... but shes done the plastics guy has my ABS sheet in but hasn't cut it yet.... been doing a bit more research and I'm going to try it in Polystyrine sheet as well and learned a few tricks to do with deep draw forming (where the opening on the die is less than 75% of the depth ) something I'm going to have a bit of when I get onto making parts containers
  42. 1 point
    1982 - 1993 Morris Marina mark 1, 1800 4 door Marina 1300 estate, this got the full 1.8 drive train when that car was scrapped Ital 1.7slx estate, became a 2.0slx when I found a 2.0 'O' series engine which I rebuilt, sold this car to a guy in southampton in late '93 mid '93 to date my 110CSW.
  43. 1 point
    I concur. And whoever thought that chassis was a nice idea wants it folded in half and jammed up their jacksie outrigger-first.
  44. 1 point
    Just went to see what is left,...... Just missing roughly in order,Morris marina 1.8/ Alfa Sud 1.2 Ti/ Triumph Dolomite 1800HL/ Austin Princess wedge 2200HL/ 1959 Mini (too rusty, never got it on the road) Then the first Land Rover, 1961 series II, after the Volvo 245 estate I had an Astra (1982) 3dr diesel, a Merc 1984 207 van, a 1970 Series IIa SWB, a 1981 polo bread van, a Merc 250D 1985, then my first Range Rover a US import 3.9 'County' LHD (we were off to France), From France just missing the Golf diesel, the Grey Fergy the Iveco 4010, An Astra estate briefly, couple of horse boxes and a Manitou! Its been fun
  45. 1 point
    Tool box porn, but what can you do now to distract you from actually building the landy?
  46. 1 point
    Ralph you’re a star for looking those out ! Hang on to them for the minute and if I have any problems with mine I’ll give you a shout. I’m determined to get to the bolt saga finale !! Didn’t have time today as the weather has turned and was also helping a mate get his diff back in on his truck 😊👍 his drive members are defo the thin type on his 2012 truck. So at least I know mines are thicker.
  47. 1 point
  48. 1 point
    I think you would need to destruction test a couple of engines of a partcular model to get a proper answer. As David said it will depend where you monitor the temperature, it will also depend on how long a particular temperature is held for. Measuring the EGT will give you a relative measurement of the temperature in the cylinders and turbo etc but not an absolute. Think of it like putting a blow torch onto a piece of metal, just because the flame is at 1000 degrees doesn't mean the metal instantly becomes that temperature (if ever, dependent on cooling properties)
  49. 0 points
    Sorry Fridge, I suspect you would prefer that I didn't post any more like this then? .... and to finish with another 'meme', whatever they are:
  50. 0 points
    Yet again you show how little you actually read and understand peoples posts. I'm dyslexic and really struggle with reading sometimes. I hope you have a similar excuse. How do you propose to deal with the misaligned prop flanges with the wedges you suggest? We don't know the shackle length so wedges will cause a vibration from the propshaft hence the request for pictures. You of all people should know better.


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