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Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/02/2020 in Posts

  1. 10 points
    You're sharing a forum with Hybrid_From_Hell who can end up in A+E just making a cup of tea and you're wondering how someone could injure themselves working on their car?
  2. 8 points
    It's times like these that really makes you re assess your priorities. I'm now acutely aware of how I've been wasting precious resources. I'm really looking at my Landrover use, and asking myself " is this right? Should I be using my Landrover like this?" So, I've decided. Life is too short to waste in an eurobox, I'm going to make my series my daily car, unless I need to bring passengers.
  3. 7 points
    made me cringe until I realised it was on your finger...
  4. 7 points
    Having said all the above, I've just bought a chain saw.
  5. 7 points
  6. 7 points
    Sun has been shining today, so I skived off work and put some more cladding on.
  7. 6 points
    My job is a mix of going out and about to hospital labs to visit customers (always viewed that as the fun part of my job) and then working from home catching up on paperwork, filling in tender responses etc. I have to admit it has always irritated me that many of my neighbours have made sarcastic comments about me "working from home again" if I pop out to the shop at lunchtime or go to post a letter as if I'm just sat indoors watching TV or playing computer games. They don't see that I started work before many people would have got to the office and if I have a deadline to meet I can continue work when they would have left the office. Maybe now people will realise it can actually be quite productive working from home with no twice daily commute to and from the office as well as less sick days because you aren't catching and spreading other people's colds added to the fact you might still be able to work from home if you feel under the weather a bit where otherwise you might not have bothered to go into the office because you can't face sitting in traffic or sitting in a room with a person you don't really like very much.
  8. 6 points
    To give a little credibility to this post, although I'm not a virologist, I do speak to them regularly in my work and of course the topic of choice right now is this very subject. I'm working in the diagnostics business providing one of the RT-PCR tests and equipment (Google m2000sp/rt if you're interested) to diagnose this strain of coronavirus in hospital labs. Although there are speculations, unfortunately at the moment we do not know for sure how fast this particular coronavirus mutates or how long immunity to it will last. Generally speaking warmer and dryer weather helps lessen the effects of respiratory infections, but again this can't be guaranteed as we just don't know with this novel strain. My biggest worry about everyone out there is not illness from the virus itself but the effect of anxiety in many people as the amount of ever increasing deaths are being announced daily. If anxious about the increasing deaths, this thought helps me in a strangely odd way: If you look up UK death rate, we have about 500,000 people die in a year from old age, illness, accidents etc. This means that on average, just under 1400 people a day die in the UK anyway. As more and more people are infected with Covid 19 and test positive, then of course more of the 1400 deaths a day will also be positive for coronavirus and can then be reported in the news as a death after testing positive. This does skew the meaning a bit in my opinion. I wonder how many of the people dieing who are also tested positive for Covid 19 would have died regardless during 2020 of something else such as heart disease for example? The only way we can say with any certainty is see how many more than the expected 500,000 deaths there are in the UK in 2020. There have been suggestions that Covid 19 will have little effect on this number.
  9. 6 points
    Can I remind all that this is a forum for discussing Land Rover and 4x4-related matters and not for idle chat. More specifically, personal attacks and derisory language are not acceptable. Discussion on Coronavirus is no problem - but please keep it civil.
  10. 6 points
    Kitchen roll to toilet roll via bandsaw lol regards Stephen
  11. 6 points
    All back in one piece, road test done, seems OK.
  12. 6 points
    What a lovely weekend I've had - Had to nip back to South Africa last week to do some work shipping classic cars back from Durban, and decided to do a little more work on my rolling restoration S2a and drive it back the 640Km to Johannesburg. I'm going to have a go at getting it up to a national park in Zimbabwe later in the year, so made some sense to have a stab at some jobs that need doing and give it a decent road test - as I bought it blind on the 'net & only used it once.. First thing that became apparant from the savage clunking I'd forgotten about was every leaf spring bush was shot to bits & the rubber was gone. Happened to drive past a leaf spring repair workshop who changed every bush for.. £45. Bonus. Had a new rad & alternator fitted last year, so aside from fixing a few oil leaks and topping up, fitting a dual battery system, adjusting some door hinges, fitting seatbelts and a swapping a couple of bits of delaminated glass courtesy of a great local landy specialist, I was off. Great engine the 2.6 straight six petrol - made light work of the steep hills through Kwa Zulu Natal, chugged uphill happily holding 50mph and a little quieter than a diesel. Turned in 24mpg overall, not bad for a 50 year old engine. Passed through some of the old Boer war battlefields, Blood River the most famous, before stopping for the night at a game ranch at Vrede (breeds game and lions etc for farming & hunting) - got in some great off-roading on the ranch and enjoyed spectacular scenery with herds of game running through the open landscape. After a morning spent playing with lion cubs, hit the road again through the wide open countryside of the Free State and on to Johannesburg. The old S2a never missing a beat all the way and getting lots of attention from other drivers - sadly a rare sight on the roads now.
  13. 6 points
    9 official criteria for NPD* grandiose sense of self-importance preoccupation with fantasies of unlimited success, power, brilliance, beauty, or ideal love belief they’re special and unique and can only be understood by, or should associate with, other special or high-status people or institutions need for excessive admiration sense of entitlement interpersonally exploitative behavior lack of empathy envy of others or a belief that others are envious of them demonstration of arrogant and haughty behaviors or attitudes *https://www.healthline.com/health/narcissistic-personality-disorder
  14. 6 points
    This weekend saw me doing a "quick" tour to deliver some IBC's to friends and move a Land Rover... IBC's ready for delivery. Dropping 2 IBC's off to Fridaynight, sleeping in the 110 was next. Saturday morning was another 160 kms. to deliver the last IBC and join the Ninety for the next job : What oh what will be loaded ???? YES !!!!!!!! His mother loves him, I'm sure, but the 300 Tdi was not really happy moving 6 tonnes around... Once the IIB FC was unloaded, next was this : All in all some 730 km. in 36 hrs. The 110 never missed a beat.
  15. 6 points
    I consider myself so very lucky. I have a 1991 CSW that I've owned since 1995 and I'm now into a complete tarmac up rebuild. I had the 3.5 V8 swapped for a 300Tdi in 2003 and never regretted it. Now, during my rebuild, I am treating it as a hobby, not a chore. This is important, because if it becomes a chore you will come to recent it. Sometimes I'll work in my shop for six hours, and other days I'll just enjoy going fishing. I'm fortunate in that I have another vehicle as my daily driver, but I am under pressure from my wife to complete the project, since it has now been over 3 years, and she wants us to go on a road trip and camping. By the way, I'm just past 77 yrs., and I had my first Landy in the early sixties, so Landy love doesn't die with years. Mike
  16. 6 points
    yes, I am doing the repower through Cummins South Africa/Botswana, so they are fitting the engine themselves and testing it before I get it, this way it isn't a "backyard" conversion and they can give me guarantees and are satisfied that the engine is correctly installed. the cummins crate engine comes in many varieties, with or without aircon, with or without catalyser, with or without power steering etc etc etc, we have chosen a variant without aircon (makes life easier for the right mounted steering box), and slightly "de-rated" from the MAX which these engines can give which is 160hp and 410NM which is too much for a R380 and too much for my drivers skill set... I will let you guys know how it goes. here are some pics of the preliminary fitting:
  17. 5 points
    I got the new engine dropped in this weekend. I have got it mounted on the two rear mounts, (one on the transfer box and one on the gearbox), just need to work out some engine mounts now. Ideally I want to pick up on the existing chassis mounts so I don't have to weld to my galvanised chassis.
  18. 5 points
    Even with these social restrictions in place, the NHS is likely to burst. If we don't have restrictions we let the virus run rampant - it only spreads by people passing it on. Then we start losing doctors and nurses as in Italy - and you can't train new ones in 6 months like ww2 fighter pilots, those gaps remain for years. Then when there are no beds, no money and few supplies we start dying of ailments we left behind a century ago. All we have to do is suck it up for a few months to make a big difference. My business is up the wazoo as well, if I need money I'll go pull potatoes or stack shelves for a bit as there will be lots of work in other areas.
  19. 5 points
    I've decided to stay home from today. It was a tough decision because my work place is still open and I'm unlikely to get paid. However I have two young children one with a suspect chest who is always getting coughs. I feel guilty being off with nothing wrong with me/my family. However I felt far more guilty yesterday being still at work and potentially spreading the virus. Having said that I will be working on various projects while at home. Mike
  20. 5 points
    you have 3 months of lockdown. Should be able to do a decent job with a fine file. Will keep you quiet for ages!
  21. 5 points
    Much of the Media is just there to poke people with sticks. If we didn’t have daily empty shelves pictures how much less panic buying would we have? Much of the Media pour petrol, fan the flames and then near gleefully report elderly and NHS workers in tears as they can’t get any food. Anything apparently fair game to sell a few more papers.
  22. 5 points
    Yes you have to keep up with the guidelines and yes that makes it more tricky. Lockdown is about the timing. Too early and everybody is safe but the virus is still out there and the economy grinds to a halt. Once everybody comes out they all get the virus, too late and the NHS is overwhelmed and people die that with access to medical assistance would have survived. So we went in a little lax but the curve is well on the up so it’s time to really get the brakes on the spread. It’s let’s get really serious time now. Going outside to remote places is sort of the right idea but if everybody has that idea then it’s wrong idea. No point walking around for 4 hours to go and catch it off the gate handle to the car park or the person in front of you on the take away queue. Doctors will be killing themselves trying to save people how about we just stay away from each other for a few months ?
  23. 5 points
    I have a 22 year old son and 18 year old daughter still living at home, he is in engineering and she is still at college. Son's company has been taking the Covid 19 issue extremely seriously and daughter was sent home along with the rest of her course yesterday as there were not enough students present to make the course sustainable for now. So far so good except daughter was given some concert tickets for her birthday recently and despite my strong advice she and her friend took themselves off to Wembley on the train last Thursday. Well that would be four trains in total there and back. They did some shopping, went to the concert, stayed in a hotel, did some more shopping then returned home. Except I banned her from the house and she is now residing in our living van out in our back paddock with only our horses for company. There's heat, 240v, cooker, fridge, tv, radio, double bed etc out there so it's not that much of a hardship.
  24. 5 points
    What? She’s calling you a broken down, incomplete and frustrating project? Seems a mite harsh... 🤔
  25. 5 points
    I’m 51 and still feel young , I think it’s human nature we find something we enjoy then seem to take it to the extreme and forget everything else we enjoy, I think it’s good that things like this can be talked about on here without ridicule or idiots with smart comments, that’s why I like this forum it’s a community a group of people whom most have never met but all are in a way friends.
  26. 5 points
    Yes. They don't have people like Gerry designing their off road vehicles.
  27. 5 points
    Well it’s been pretty wet and wild but beggars can’t be choosers, so I donned the waterproofs and cracked on. I spent most of yesterday doing the membrane on the wall facing the fence, until I got fed up with being soaked and freezing. Today I managed to get some of the cladding on the same wall. I’m pleased with the cladding, seems to lie very well and other than a few imperfections here and there the quality is good. The screws work really well. The only fixings I’ve pre-drilled are the ones where there’s a join on a batten and so I’ve only got half a batten width of cladding piece to screw through. For everything else the drilling end of the screws does a great job. I also finished putting the membrane on the front wall and have blocked off the door aperture with sheathing ply to keep the rain out, with a view to helping the building dry out a bit over the next few weeks. It also finally gives me a dry-ish, albeit rather gloomy, space to work.
  28. 4 points
  29. 4 points
    The one thing I hope this experience teaches a number of people is to not take things for granted that have been in the past. I'm probably hoping for too much there.
  30. 4 points
    There is an article in the Spectator that goes through some of the statistics around the various death rates in the UK normally. The phrase that grabbed me was "But we have yet to see any statistical evidence for excess deaths, in any part of the world." (Excess deaths - i.e. more deaths than we would have had normally in the same period). Spectator, 28th March 2020, "The Corona Puzzle" Dr John Lee.
  31. 4 points
    So in reality we are all Nigel in some way
  32. 4 points
    If it were me and I was working at home / not working then I'd probably consider that a daily form of exercise. One thing to perhaps bear in mind is on the route do you have to open any gates etc., because that'd be where the risk lies. When I lived in Surrey I'd probably cover 5-10 miles a day walking the dogs so I think that's a reasonable distance for your daily exercise. So what you need is a Labrador puppy (more reliable than girlfriends and loyal to a fault) : Wonder what's going to happen in a few weeks when it's time to offload the puppies. One isn't too bad because it's destined for my folks a couple of miles away but one is going to Bristol and another to somewhere near / in London. Don't really want to have to start dealing with this level of s***e for several months!
  33. 4 points
    Yet more cladding. The gable ends are such a faff!
  34. 4 points
    I ended up working every weekend running a business fixing badly prepped overland vehicles. I got so fed up with Land Rover in general that I sold my 110, then cried like a little girl as it drove away. So I bought the Disco (200tdi) which is wonderful. I use it as a daily driver, so I keep up on the maintenance. I'm now at the point where ever fix by the previous owner is sorted and every lapse by the PO's garage is sorted. I average about 700 miles a week in it. Generally smiling. Costs come out of my car allowance... When it needs to come off the road for a couple of day's I use the Mighty Modus. I've jacked in Greenlaning because, again, I ended up immersing my life too far into it. County Rep for two counties, SW area liaison for GLASS, LAF Chairman... all soul destroying. I still cover these roles but spend my time working with the Police Rural Crimes team to help nick the rednecks who misuse lanes. It's fun and feels worthwhile... Finally I bought my wife a T4 Caravelle. Living the DubLife is great. T4 owners are very loyal to each other, very friendly and very helpful. Like it used to be in the LR world... And they are just unreliable enough to be fun and relatively easy to work on What I'm saying here is this. Do'nt sell up. Mothball or reduce, but keep something. Back away for a year or two, do other stuff...
  35. 4 points
    Since it has been requested by a few people I thought I'll relinquish and post a build thread for the new garage. It's loosely 4x4 related since it'll be housing my two Land Rovers (the 300Tdi 110 and Sandringham 6x6), the latter has proven to be a little pain in the backside... Now there should be other higher priority projects on the go (converting what were stables into a machine shop, electronics lab and office for the business) but in order to get the 18+ tonne lorries to there for doing the slabs for the floor wasn't going to happen with a lawn in the way. I'd been using one end as a dry area for working on the 110 when I needed to and it started tearing up the grass. As I cleared it out of the way I discovered a cobbled driveway under the lawn. Anyway with part of a driveway in place a chap came in and graded another bit of the lawn so we could fill with hardcore to make a driveway for lorries to get to the workshops. Except I needed some hardcore. Then Dad (all of this is his fault I might hasten to add) had suggested a place to build a garage and I knew from planting some fruit trees that the soil wasn't particularly deep and hit shale after about 6 inches. So the plan was hatched to excavate the hole for the garage and this would provide hardcore for the driveway. Once the lorries had driven over it and compacted it further I could grade the top and add some nicer stone rather than shale. So excavations started: Which resulted in the following hole in the bank: The back of the house for reference is off to the right - the house behind the telegraph pole is a neighbour but I own the 1/4 acre or so of "vegetable" garden above the wall between me and them. After having a careful read through the planning regulations / permitted development rules for Wales provided I keep it under 2.5m eaves (4m roof line) and under 2.25 acres then I don't need planning . I'm inclined currently to keep it under that height because the above photo is actually looking south and making it much taller may impact upon sun getting to the house. I'm half considering making it underground so that there can be a grassy / sunny balcony on-top of it. And everyone wants an underground lair don't they? But then some prat decided to go and buy a Sandringham 6 139". So dutifully both vehicles were parked inside the hole to see how they fitted. Hmmm. A little tight and was going to make an interesting shape (the wall was at an angle from roughly the spade to where the camera is). So seeing as I'm unlikely to ever move again from this 7-9 bed mad house I've bought I knew I'd be kicking myself if I didn't make it a bit bigger. Did someone say bigga digga? For reference that's a 13 tonne machine and the back of the bank is above his roof-line so guessing about 3m high. For scale here the smallest bucket for the machine Ben's got (this isn't his biggest machine): And the beauty is his depot is just down the road from me (about 1/4 mile). Unfortunately that's pretty much it for now - I ran down the yard to look at some electrics for him and when I got back puppies were demanding feed and then it got dark. I'll get a comparable picture with the two Land Rovers in there but at the moment there's a 6 tonne dumper and 13 tonne excavator parked in it... As it'll fall under building regs because of the floor area (something like 24x30ft) and I don't have the time looking into getting some local well respected builders in to do the majority of the work. They've also got a friendly building regs gal and structural engineer to hand which will make things smoother. But the structure is going to be reinforced shuttered concrete as it's below ground and that will effectively tank it from the water coming through the sides. There are some old land drains that have been split since doing this work - half tempted to pipe them through the wall into a wash basin . The shuttering should also work out cheaper overall since it'll just be some ply and 2x4 structure, some rebar and then get the concrete in...
  36. 4 points
    Why do that? I like to see opinions from people on here that I feel I know and trust.
  37. 4 points
    I might add that my daughter has not shown any symptoms to date although she says she's had the sniffles for a couple of weeks. Still, I was and am not prepared to have her go against my advise to stay well clear of trains, shops and and a large capacity concert in London especially as I told them that I would cover any out of pocket expenses if they didn't go - hellfire it was her first trip to London on their own anyway. The young sometimes believe they are invincible but I'm in my 6th decade and have a few issues anyway, I'd rather my own young not take chances with my health 🤬
  38. 4 points
    Yes please! My dilemma is actually not whether to break the projects, but whether it's worth assembling them. They're both currently in pieces. I do have pics of the SW as it arrived to me, and can obviously photograph the pieces. But... I'm wondering how attractive a disassembled project is... I'm likely to get the usual flood of vultures looking for the juicy/rare bits anyhow. Don't daily drive the 109, it's purely been a toy/utility thing. I've been through a few steam projects and never regretted putting all the work into something I don't own. The pride seeing it gleaming and alive, the experience, the skills I've managed to soak up and the people I've met pay ten-fold what owning it ever would. I have railway volunteering to thank in part for my skills set that's been so kindly commented on. Also: I don't pay the bills! I've got a few young chaps in my team - 19 and 21 - who are beginning the same journey I did. It's wonderful seeing them grow in skill and confidence. That being said, I do understand that not all volunteers gets treated so well as I have, which is very sad. I worked for years with a chap who actually owned his own loco. He was always super clear that those that help him get to enjoy it the same way he did. It felt like ours, not just his. It's a great shame not everyone gets that same experience. I'll still be around, @Stellaghost! Many interesting projects and talented engineers worth following here
  39. 4 points
    Winner Winner Chicken Dinner !! New ignition switch arrived, fitted it this afternoon. Everything all cleaned up. Boom result! Actually a good bit of difference in the starting up. Does seem a lot stronger now. A nice end to the problem. 3 new relays and an ignition “Lucas” switch = £38 Used the same barrel in the new switch so same key and all is good. 😎
  40. 4 points
    This. I kept this going for ages (owned the landy for 28 years). So keep the one that is most valuable to you. I somehow are never tempted to sell, due to the time already spend on the project. There is a lot of value in that, that only you appreciate. There have been times were the landy was sitting untouched in the garage for ages (about 4 years I think after Ladoga when the engine was dead and our first baby was born). But I always came back to it. I am not quite the right example for having only 1 project, as I bought the Jeep as well recently. This is a slow burner, and I am in no rush with it. If it comes to it, it could be my retirement project (yes, being middle aged does make you think about this). And why is that a problem? The thing I will say, is that most people that sell their project unfinished do regret it later. So the message is if you have the space and it doesn't cost you anything there is no real point of selling and making a loss.
  41. 4 points
    Really like how they're building the suspense with the marketing campaign. Anyone else think the dig at monocoque chassis being used for SUVs rather than proper 4x4s is in reference to the latest "Defender"?
  42. 4 points
    Disappointing. No mention of the design philosophy for the appearance, no mention of the accessories, what sort of entertainment systems or the styling of the wheels.
  43. 4 points
    Now, I know this is a Land Rover forum, however I'd assume (or at least hope), that most Land Rover owners are also avid 4x4 and off road enthusiasts also. Therefore being interested in all things 4wd. Using this rational and the fact Land Rover seems completely reluctant to offer a rugged 4x4 these days, forcing potential buyers to shop elsewhere. I thought some of you might find this of interest. If not, you can always skip to the next thread..... ____________________________________________________ Living with a Jimny – The 2 week Road-test Review I have had my Jimny for two weeks now. Yes, that’s right, it is mine. Undoubtedly this review will be slightly biased. However, having now spent 25 hours or more seat time and over 650 miles covered. I suspect I’m well placed to offer an initial opinion. Remember many motoring journalists may only get a few hours or a day with a vehicle to review it. I’ll dive straight in and say it is an extremely pleasing and satisfying vehicle to pilot. It isn’t 100% perfect, but no car is. However, it is getting rather close for me, with only a few minor niggles or complaints. This is purely an ‘on-road’ review at this stage. The vehicle will be going off road, but it has been far to wet and muddy to get something I own completely filthy off road. Therefore, an ‘off-road’ review will be following this article in due course. The Jimny is an Ivory Chiffon SZ5 5-speed manual. Therefore, comes with all the toys offered in the UK for the Jimny. The interior is a very pleasant place to be, the seats are squishy, but very comfortable. They are also heated and will cook your behind, they really do get rather toasty. My previous daily driver, a Smart ForTwo Prime Sport of 2017 vintage also had superb heated seats, that also heated the lower portion of the seat back. Unfortunately, the Jimny seems confined to only heating the seat base. A shame for certain, but certainly not a deal breaker. There is ample headroom in the Jimny, not that I worry about such things, being more akin to Richard Hammond in height than that of most average Britons. And there is also ample elbow room, provided you are of a regular girth. The Jimny’s external width is quite narrow, and therefore so is its interior. Large people may end up at rather close quarters to each other. The rest of the cabin is airy and generally a pleasant place to be. The door trims are simple plastic but fit the character of the car. The dash top is of a very nice stippled material. Which would have gone well in other places in the interior. However, the interior is my only real complaint. Not in its materials though. Just a general lack of cubby storage. For instance, there is small tray below the dash in front of the gearstick. Conveniently placed near the only USB port. Hooray, somewhere to place your smartphone. Yet, alas no. The tray is fine for a decade old iPhone 5, but a modern larger phone does not fit. Come on Suzuki, how can you make such a basic error! It is unforgivable, well almost. While on this subject, the lack of USB ports is also somewhat of a shame. There is a 12v power outlet next to the USB port and a second 12v socket in the boot, which will be handy for a cooler/fridge when out laning or similar. But in a modern car, you are likely to want maybe four or five USB ports; smartphone, passengers smartphone, iPad (for mapping duties when overlanding/laning), dashcam and so on. My only other niggle with the interior, which some might sight is petty are the sun visors. They leave a large gap between the left edge (right hand drive car) and the interior mirror. Allowing that pesky low sun at this time of year to easily shine right past. The rest of the interior carries no complaints, the Jimny comes reasonably well specced with Cruise Control/Speed Limiter, Climate Control, leccy windows, heated mirrors and central dashboard touchscreen with in-built Navigation, DAB radio and Apple CarPlay support. In terms of driver focused interior components. The steering wheel is a work of art. Thin rimmed, nice grippy material and very comfortable to hold and rotate. Lots of room for your fingers and easy to reach controls. It must be one of the nicest modern steering wheels I’ve had my hands on. Mercedes-Benz, please take note. I recently drove a brand new GLA and my lasting impression is what a ghastly, uncomfortable, horrid steering wheel it had, with absolutely nowhere to put your fingers! The gearbox in the Jimny is a joy to behold too. The standard gearknob may not look all that pretty, but in the hand, it is comfortable to use. The gearbox itself is also one of the sweetest I have stirred. It makes you want to shift cogs, even if you don’t need too. The pedals are also well placed with sensible grippy pads, something I’m sure I will appreciate even more when off road and driving with muddy boots. The handbrake is also placed exactly where you hand lands, allowing you to easily use it without the need to look down to find it. The boot is laughably small on these. But this should come as no surprise to anyone. The Jimny has two rows of seats and a longitudinal mounted engine. All packaged into a vehicle that is only 140” in long. Fortunately the rear seats fold down quickly and easily. Offering up a fairly large load area for such a small vehicle. Enough of the interior, what is it like on the open road? Well, I have read many a review and comment posted across the inter-web. And I often see people saying things like skittering over bumps, rolling in corners, uncomfortable, crashy suspension and other such stereotypical nonsense many 4x4’s get associated with. However, I must wonder if some of these people have actually been in the vehicle they are claiming to be reviewing? As my personal experience couldn’t be further from this. To give a little parody to this, on the day I collected my Jimny I also drove my then 2017 Smart ForTwo as well as a brand new Mercedes GLA200 (had 26 miles on the clock). Out of the three vehicles, the Jimny is easily the most comfortable and I’d argue rode nicer than the GLA did. The Mercedes was shod with massive alloys and low-profile tyres and every imperfection in the road, and I do mean every. Was transmitted into the cabin with a very audible “thump”. Which was felt throughout the entire car. The Jimny positively glides over the same roads. Yes, some may accuse me of being biased and having a personal stake in the Jimny. But at the end of the day, all I can do is report my findings and offer my opinion. And based on this, I’d rather ride in the archaic live axle vehicle, if comfort was a concern, despite popular opinion found across the internet. I admit there are some rare occasions where a particular road surface does give a particular sensation, most likely due to the short wheelbase combined with live axles. However, I would still say the ride comfort is still very, very good. And if you are complaining about it, then you’d not like over 90% of the cars on the roads either. There really is nothing wrong at all with how they ride. So, what about the handling I hear you ask? Well, here again I may be labelled as biased. Although, I’d much prefer to use the term experienced. I have grown up with 4x4’s. My first “car” was a Defender 90 way back in 1997. And since then I have owned a good number of 4-wheel drives from Land Rover and Jeep and driven many more besides. While not wanting to sound big headed, I suspect many people less familiar with off road vehicles simply don’t grasp that a live axle vehicle will feel somewhat different in the corners compared to a vehicle running independent suspension at each corner. In direct regard to the Jimny, I have found it to be most pleasing and exciting out on the country roads. It handles really well and is a huge amount of fun. From the inside it certainly doesn’t feel like it is leaning and rolling excessively or uncontrollably. Which completely baffles me when people claim that it does. I’ll go as far to say, that I have enjoyed driving it as much as any sports car I’ve been in. In reality you won’t be making the same kind of progress or speed. But you’d never know you this from the driver’s seat unless looking at the speedo. You truly feel like you are flying along. For anyone experienced with how well a Defender 90 can tackle British B-roads, the Jimny drives in much the same way, but feels lighter and more nimble. The steering may lack feedback for some, but the rest of the chassis communicates well and will reward a smooth driving style. To which the wonderful gearbox compliments this experience tenfold. The engine is rather a peach too, on paper a 1.5 litre naturally aspirated inline 4 with only 100hp or so, doesn’t sound all that much. But it is super smooth, very characterful and will pull from nothing. Sub 1500rpm kind of nothing in any of the 5 forward gears. With plenty of mid-range punch and will, unlike many modern turbo units happily, rev out to the red line. Obviously with only 100’ish bhp on tap, even for a vehicle weighing just over a tonne, the Jimny is never going to be a rocketship. That said, it actually has a respectable power to weight ratio when you look at certain sporty hatchbacks and sports cars from yesteryear. But here the Jimny has another party trick, the engine makes a surprisingly nice rumble above 3500rpm, one of the nicer sounding inline 4’s I’ve encountered. The engine has wonderful character and eagerness. This eagerness makes you believe and feel that it is accelerating far quicker than you actually are. Which is rather ideal out on the public roads and simply adds to the already high levels of fun. This is truly a vehicle to make you smile, while remaining at fairly sane and legal speeds. On the subject of speed, the Jimny is no motorway cruiser. While it will happily sit at motorway speed; 70mph is nearing 3500rpm on the tacho and wind noise picks up too. However, sit at 60-65mph and it is very comfortable. But you need to change your mindset to simply not care about other cars buzzing past you. In reality you’ll probably get where you are going in almost the same time anyhow. And more than likely you’ll be doing it with a bigger smile on your face than most. Do I recommend the 4th Generation Jimny? Absolutely!
  44. 4 points
    Making a car on a new platform isn't just a matter of designing it. You also have to be able to build it. Parts and platform sharing allows it to be build on the same if not very similar production lines as the other cars. VAG is a master at this. A manufacturer like Jeep can have an assembly plant for the Wrangler because their other cars share a platform with the rest of FCA. Tesla isn't exactly the best example of good production practices... For a manufacturer like LR it makes sense to reuse a platform. And who cares that it's old if it works well? How many issues are there with the D7 platform other than "it's not a live axle"? I'm sure LR didn't spend 10 years twiddling their thumbs. They most likely had a bunch of different concepts, all of which were evaluated, and what they have now released as the new Defender ticked the most boxes for them, simple. Or they could've build an entirely new assembly plant for a live-axled Defender with a ladder chassis that ticks everyone's boxes, and charge 150k for it, and then everyone would still be crying because it's too expensive.
  45. 4 points
    Is it over yet? If you want to buy a new Defender buy one, if not don't. All the urinating contests regarding the new model on here won't change JLR's business model one little bit. I'd like to go back some years and watch folks talk about Zeus timing gears, oil in TD5 looms &failed oil pump drives or misaligned 300Tdi timing pulleys. Those were the days when I enjoyed looking in here and seeing who was spoiling for a bundle that day. In my impatient senior years this thread just seems to be going around the same well worn track every few days. Boring. Methinks it's time I moved on.
  46. 3 points
    An excellent post, Monkie. I don't know about anyone else, but I've got far more anxiety about the economic impact than the death rate. The lockdown has already devasted my income and despite government care packages, I reckon 2/3 of my customers will be gone if measures last longer than a few months. That's my business gone, and I'm hardly in a unique situation. Lives are valuable, but not infinitely so. If we're not careful, we end up in a world that's not worth living in for a majority to save a minority. To be clear, I'm not saying no action should be taken, but the benefits need to be measured objectively. We've also just opened the door and walked into a dystopian nightmare police state with severely compromised freedom, lapping it down eagerly and asking for more. I'm not particularly comfortable with that, it concerns me greatly. Not the immediate effect, but that it shows governments how easy it is to scare entire populations into asking to have their freedoms forcibly removed. On a lighter note, Belarus just had a "You think Trump is a moron? Hold my beer" moment. The Belarusian president claims the virus isn't there because "you can't see it flying around, can you?". You couldn't write it.
  47. 3 points
    Not sure Basingstoke has a SAR service, we're devoid of rugged coastline, precipitous mountains or misty moors Totally get the comments about some of the types 4x4 response attracts, but my view is that they are at least an organised point of contact for when support is needed, and I'll do anything to NOT have to go on bl**dy Facebook to find out who needs a hand! The chappy did look a bit bemused when I arrived for the vehicle & kit check in the 109, I guess it doesn't have enough amber beacons and I couldn't in good conscience tick the box for "suspension lift" on their sign-up form as it is of course standard height
  48. 3 points
    Paddy? Irritating cabaret/game show host. Freddie has calmed a little. Harris has done some proper car stuff this season, the McRae piece was epic, especially as he was rallying as I got my driving licence.
  49. 3 points
  50. 3 points
    Good point. I tend to use cored wire for that sort of thing. Not as neat but less hassle, other than regular use of a wire brush. Also, for learning, it removes one variable, which isn't a bad thing. I'm not a great welder. I mostly weld 2nd hand steel and my visor is from an arc welder and too dark. I have a few other excuses stored away...


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