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  1. Managed to get her finished off today, after a minute to prime the oil and fuel system she started pretty effortlessly. Been for some test drives and she seems to work ok, feels a bit different, not quite sure how yet, and she might be a little more smokey at times, but that could just be me focusing more on the exhaust pipe during the test drives. Was pretty nervous turning the key, that's for sure! Hopefully I can keep her going a few more years before I rebuild the engine.
    7 points
  2. Oh nooo, apple got me, damn, imagine just expecting tech to work. I didn’t want to post a youtube link because of the bloody adverts but I put it on youtube too after I noticed that the thumbnail didn’t come up. I posted videos before from my iphone and they worked? What else I noticed, I was actually typing the post and the curser was hidden and now it works. Maybe there was a glitch in the matrix?
    7 points
  3. I've been giving this some thought and I'm going to stick with double skinned, part of this thought process is coming from the post Daan put up about the diff shortening, they were looking at weight saving as appose to packaging issues which is what I've got. Also on thier FB page there was no evidence that they had looked at lightening the axle casing, which could have been a massive saving, I would imagine they must have looked at it. At the end of the day this is a toy, I don't need on road performance and I cannot see me doing Ladoga, total finished weight shouldn't be more than a 110 with winches and a salsbury back axle and a lot of them seem to manage very well off road. At the moment it's all about the build which I have to say I'm enjoying immensely as it's something I've fancied doing for a good while but as we all know life in general has it's own priorities and have to do's regards Stephen
    7 points
  4. Well, I took delivery of a shiny new Richards Chassis a few weeks ago now (mid May) and I just haven't had time to do anything. Small progress as I got it on the rollover jig I have for another project today. Fairly quick job and now I can turn it over for painting and easily move it around the workshop (including outside when I T-wash it prior to painting). Just got to unbolt the turrets from where they were bolted for delivery and the rear body cross member then ready to prep for paint.
    6 points
  5. So on with the double skinning I will warn you now its a bit of a long winded post apologies Some 31/2" 1/4" Wall pipe and a bit of rough box made out of channel Getting hashy with the plasma cutter, no neat measurements Hammered to rough shape and welded up Blended Anybody sussed out where I'm going with this ? Lots of heat Box wedge thingy put in and smacked with a 14lb hammer Then realised its a slow process and probably not going to happen So on with plan B Cue big press, lots of heat several times End result Split in half and voilà two axle skins of sorts Straightened out a wee bit via hammer and anvil and stretched ends cut off Some more trimming etc and then tacked into position to check fit A bit more swaging and I'm just about there regards Stephen
    6 points
  6. Seems perfectly reasonable to me ... My coat ? How kind ... Mo 😉
    6 points
  7. I’ve just booked a test drive in October 😊
    5 points
  8. This is a great video, because they took the cars as they came out of the factory and weren't scared to use them on a testing track. For me, it summarises 149 pages of this thread. As we know, Land Rover "replaced" the Defender with quite a comfortable car. To give it some credibility in the rough, they gave the driver the ability to lift it and threw complicated electronics at it (to maximise the limited amount of traction available from a heavy car with relatively small, low profile tyres). This caused a split amongst us Land Rover fans: those of us who appreciate the comfort and marvel at how well those electronics work, on the rare occasions you need them; and those of us who like practical cars, aren't remotely surprised at the outcome of this video and consider the decision-makers at JLR to be a pack of muppets! We see both aspects in the video. Personally, I think you'd either have to have massive brand loyalty or no intention of ever driving any sort of rough track to pick the Defender over that Bronco...
    5 points
  9. Off topic but whilst machining this I filled in the spaceduring cuts by refurbishing our small multi fuel stove First off about 3 hours with a needle gun getting rid of enamel coating then a good rotary wire brush finally painted with matt black stove paint will refit glass and seals once paint has hardened off overnight, so if you have one with chipped enamel don't bin it because it can look good again regards Stephen
    5 points
  10. What a donkey, forgot I had this 50 mm milling cutter measured with vernier, perfect size so just need to set up on Mill when I'm ready regards Stephen
    5 points
  11. A considerable amount of time later Things are starting to take shape.......... still a long way to go regards Stephen
    5 points
  12. What's wrong with a centre Speedo?
    5 points
  13. Being worth the extra cash is one thing, me being able to physically afford it however, is a completely different story..... 😆
    5 points
  14. Anybody else have those days where you might as well put your tools down, shut the garage door say f..k it and go and have a cuppa That was my day today, started off OK got a mates rotavator running, had no spark, champion start on my stuff Cue taking apart the short drive shaft flexible steering joint so I can change shafts nothing simpler I say ( from a man who has never stripped one of these before) First off the 4 little screws that hold the end caps on smashed my impact driver bit Had to put a small chisel in the side and smacked said chisel to get them out, and dropped one, after 10 minutes of looking gave up and progressed strip down so all these needle rollers come out from the joint easy you say NOT Central shaft does not want to budge even with hammer and drift Lifted it out of vice and then one side rollers decide just to slide out Ahhhgģgģgg Spent the next 21/2 hours on my hands and knees looking for them ( if I ever find out what dropped stuff uses for propellant I will be a very wealthy man ) and found all but one that was obviously going to happen Never mind I started pressing shaft out That went OK 5 tonne later and shaft out all good apart from one small seal dropping and me once again on my knees looking for it, got it on the up side I found previously lost screw but have called it quits on the needle roller, land-rover uj's are too small so I went and asked Google and got nowhere I had a bright idea Cue one 2.5 mm drill bit cut it to length and round the ends a bit Perfect, mixed it in with the rest of its new buddies and cannot find it so I guess that's a good thing And yes I've still shut the garage door for today regards Stephen
    5 points
  15. I thought this would be helpful to share for others doing an overhaul. So I took some pictures to show you. I have completely stripped down a Defender spec 200Tdi engine for overhaul. I wanted to replace the crankshaft Bush or spigot (LFB50050) but it was in tight and wouldn't drop out nor was I able to get it out with my finger and I didn't want to apply heat to the end of the crankshaft. I have read that you can pack the end of the crankshaft with grease then place a tight fitting cylindrical object and hit with a hammer to hydraulically push the Bush out. This comes with a warning that you might cover yourself in grease and it will leave a mess behind. I then read (possibly on here) that an old trick is to use bread (yes, ordinary bread from the kitchen cupboard) in a similar manner but it won't leave a greasy mess. Sounded too good to be true so in the name of science I thought I'd try it. Success! I put bread in the end of the crank, turned it up vertically resting on a piece of wood then just a few firm taps with a hammer onto a reduction adapter that I didn't mind hitting and it moved up and out. Quick and easy, so hear are the photos.
    5 points
  16. I finally got around to installing the Piper 270 camshaft last month and I have been very pleased with it. A couple of weeks ago we went to a place about 110 km. from La Paz that we go to reasonably often located at 1,500 metres a.s.l. and on the return trip the truck was able to hold third gear for most of the way on the long climbs. As this was the main reason for the camshaft change I am more than happy. The performance on the flat has been noticeably improved as well. Cheers, Del
    4 points
  17. I like 255s. An extra inch under the diff, a small upgear and they do fill the arches well. Mo
    4 points
  18. I find fixing anything will always produce better mpg as I always end up with left over bolts, washers and odd bits which reduces the weight of the vehicle overall. My estimate is the current tuck is at least 5kg lighter with this ideology.
    4 points
  19. Project interruption unit regards Stephen
    4 points
  20. I think they are a result of far too much effort, in all honesty.
    4 points
  21. New toy for me to play with regards Stephen
    4 points
  22. Umm, The actual link is much higher up than the lowest extremity of the bracket so in real life it doesn’t look as bad as it does in the pictures. It does all sit much lower than a defender but nothing’s as low as the springs on a 70 series for example.
    4 points
  23. If this is a steering shaft then, low speed low movement even in its unhardened state the drill bit will outlast Stephen Lol From experiance it will be in the worst spot possible.... in my case under the bench with my scrap metal, floor sweepings and grinder dust.... now there is a caveat to this, it will only have gone here if you check/clean everywhere else first There is one other caveat to this, which you have applied... to buy or build a replacement part, the missing roller will now show up (most likely in a rather obvious spot that will leave you wondering how you didn't see it) most likely not long after you have gotten the item assembled Good read lol cheers
    4 points
  24. I really like the interior. The outside looks very good too. I think we should bomb the French factory though and go back to building it in Wales. Mo
    4 points
  25. Live axles deliver. If you need to move stuff, reliably, you can't beat live axles. It's not wrong to like a successful technology. Nothing luddite about that.
    4 points
  26. The Series heritage slowly modified over time but essentially the same thing. Basic, functional, modular, flexible, serviceable in the field with a basic toolkit, endlessly repairable etc. etc. etc. Most of that came from having a chassis with bolt-on body parts. That four-wheel drive big family station wagon, with approximately seven forward facing seats, was the role of the Discovery. It was differentiated from the Freelander by a proper four wheel drive system and real ground clearance, as well as the size, and from the Range Rover by less and less as time went on, other than having more seats and more space. It never really mattered if the construction was body on chassis or monocoque because it was always a station wagon. So yes, there have always been Series/Defender station wagons but the line was not limited to them and, even so, they were never the family or luxury versions of the concept. Put all that together and the new Defender is, to all intents and purposes, another version of a Discovery.
    4 points
  27. I've taken an L322 on rougher stuff than that track with 19" wheels, what @Naks says is very true about how you'd drive with or without terrain response. It look me a little while to get used to it when I had the L322 but once you did it was a doddle to drive compared to a vehicle without it. To be honest in general I really wasn't that impressed with their driving technique either. Their comments on articulation were interesting as well - the Bronco doesn't look like it's got anywhere near the articulation that the L322 does even with the "sway" bars disconnected, the Jeep looks similar or slightly more. Okay it's not a current model but personally if I wanted something like that I'd be very hard pushed to take a new Defender over an L322 but that's my personal choice (mainly because of the option of having a V8). I have no idea on how good the L405 would be because I don't like the shape of it so have no interest in it. Even on the TDV8 models you can get an 18" wheel to fit (albeit after market from Compmotive because they made an alloy for the Nemesis that could take 18" tyres but still clear the massive Brembo calipers). Keeping to standard size tyres you can now get decent all terrain tyres in 18 and 19". If you're willing to go up a slight bit on profile (e.g. from a 50 to 55 profile) then you can get all terrain tyres for 20".
    3 points
  28. Two months on and still no new truck on the place - but I have not been idle. I'm not sure I want to hang on to my 3.2 auto facelift Ranger until Ineos have finished developing and launched the Grenadier. While the Ranger is immaculate and faultless with only just over 11,000 miles on the clock in the last few days it has turned 5 years old. I don't really want to gamble on having one of the first Grenadiers as I would rather let others be the real world testers before laying down the cash, this means that practically it could be 18 months to 2 years before I can definitely say I like what I've seen and heard of the new vehicle here's my money Jim. This means I am looking for something that will do what the Ranger has done so well in the last five years before investing in something that could well serve me for the rest of my driving life [I turned 60 something or other this past weekend so fingers crossed, touch wood etc etc hoping that the Big C stays away]. So, I have looked at various options from various manufacturers new to second hand. I was toying with a s/h L405 but I don't know, I've done Range Rovers in the past and finding a decent one at the right price is a chore. Trailing around viewing secondhand stuff fills me with trepidation now since a recent antibody test revealed that my illness and subsequent chemo has left me with virtually no immunity not only from C19 [despite two jabs] but also from any other bug and nasty. Things that would usually not be an issue prior to getting ill but could well be serious for me now. All this applies to the Defender Wolf which I quite fancied too but they are all getting a bit long in the tooth - of course what I really should have done was keep hold of any one of the last Defenders I bought new but constant issues and attempted warranty fixes that failed became a joke, especially with my which was made in the last year of production. Dealer support and "courtesy" became a joke and source of real annoyance. A new Defender? Sorry I just can't work up the enthusiasm for a test drive let alone splash out on one. So that leaves the usual range of pick-ups and nowadays it's hard to get a fag paper between them the various offerings are that similar. I like the Ranger, unlike JLR now there is a Ford dealership within easy striking distance in most of the UK, there are plenty about around here which is usually a good sign, parts supply is good, they are easily serviced, drive well, tow very well and with decent tyres will do what I need off road around here most of the time, the biggest moan I would have about mine are the abysmal headlamps, they truly are appalling. So why not a new one? Good question, I tested one and there is no doubt the bi turbo 2.2 TDCI feels a touch livelier than my 3.2 and the steering a tad lighter but apart from that everything is the same and as much as I like it I fancy a change. I could rattle on and on in much the same vein and doubtless some will disagree with my opinions but it would be a boring all world if we all had the same views and opinions wouldn't it. Anyway, I may have found a new vehicle that I actually quite like. Today I test drove the new Isuzu D Max - and like it. Ok it has a smaller engine than my 3.2 Ranger but it felt a bit more perky than the 2.2 TDCI Ranger. The 6 speed auto felt better in terms of smooth changes and ratios than the 6 speed auto in my Ranger and on a par with the latest 10 speed. Being a bit lighter means I think I am right in saying the D Max is not hindered by falling within the commercial speed limits as my Ranger does. Selecting 2WDH / 4WDH is instant and can be done on the fly up to 60MPH. 4WDL is adequate. Towing is as per the Ranger up to 3.5 ton max. Rear diff lock comes as standard on the models I'm interested in. Bits in the engine bay are accessible and not hidden under acres of plastic. The cabin is a pleasant place to be. Yeah, out of all the pickups the new D Max appeals.
    3 points
  29. Doesn't look like a lot of progress but it's taken me ages to get to this point Second one on a diet shaft turned in lathe and then cut into two pins and radius arms pinned together then put in Mill vice and started profiling You can see its starting to take shape ( a long way to go) at least to a position where it can be finished off with flap wheels and discs going down the grades until I achieve the finish I want regards Stephen
    3 points
  30. Sorry Charlie, I forgot I had promised to add some pictures to this thread I think the overall build of them is pretty tidy. There are a few places where the texture of the galvanising shows through the paint, but that's a small price to pay I think, and can be addressed with care on the A pillars and top corners where it is on display. I haven't had to do anything to it that compromises the galv to make it fit so far either, though my second build is not yet finished. There was a fair bit of basic work to do to it though. cleaning out all of the round holes, and fitting rivnuts etc was fairly quick, but it took probably a couple of hours for me to file all the excess zinc out of the square holes that take all the plastic captive nuts for the dashboard and transmission tunnel. A sharp set of needle files would have helped. I will try to get some photo's of it as it stands tomorrow, just so you can see which bits I have and haven't fitted to it.
    3 points
  31. Not my grandma; she was darn right dangerous in her bright yellow Datsun Cherry.
    3 points
  32. And there in lies my real bug bear with things like Megasquirt etc., yes I appreciate it was started decades ago and people struggled with soldering anything smaller than a battery cable but technology has moved on so far since those days. I had high hopes of the Speeduino project but the moment I saw the fact that they had "highly optimised the code to run on an Arduino" immediately meant to me they'd chosen the wrong micro in the first instance. My inclination for a rpelacement Megasquirt / Dieselsquirt whatever you want to call it would be scrap the micro, put a tiny little ARM core in there as a supervisor and a small little FPGA. V6, V8, V10, V16, W16 who cares that's what FPGAs are superb at doing multiple things in parallel. Again <10us resolution is perfectly doable chosing the right components. I guess my background is in timing things down in the picosecond range and having to process things in nanoseconds so when you've got microseconds to achieve something you can do soooo much in that time . Plus you don't really have to react to something in an engine - it's all fairly predictive (yes you do need to adapt to things but that's in slow time - hence the ARM). Generating a 120V rail that can withstand inductive loads is tricky but not difficult. Generating a 500kW 1.2kV DC rail from 3-phase whilst retaining a 0.99 power factor and >98% efficiency more or less irrespective of loading, now that's a challenge but achievable. Like you I too am very tempted to give it a go just for curiosity. I've got a bunch of systems in my desk that are more than capable of handling the timing / complexity requirements, once it's developed could easily be shrunk down on device size to reduce cost. I mean you don't need a quad core 1.2GHz SoC to run an engine but it'll be handy to develop on . Just need to find someone to donate us a 4.2 Supercharged and a TDV8 that we are allowed to dismantle / blow up.
    3 points
  33. If it's petrol, take yor pick of aftermarket ECU's from Megasquirt 1 upwards, MS2 would be my choice. Ed - generating a good solid 120v rail inside the ECU adds a problem / cost, and as I understand it anything that doesn't have a mechanical injection pump is likely to be doing multiple carefully-timed squirts per "event", that's how modern lumps are so much better and smoother than older ones. With spark you just need to fire the thing at the right moment (and can do it wasted-spark too), with diesel you need to fire the thing at the right moment AND for the right period AND potentially do that multiple times within each event and do it per-cylinder not banked/batched as you can with petrol. Put it this way - to run a V8 pretty well an MS1 has 2x 12v-capable injector drivers and 4x 5v logic coil drivers and can run well enough on a very slow 8-bit micro with ~0.1ms resolution. For a TDV8 you'd need 8 injector drivers that can do 120v into a seriously chunky inductive load and I'd guess you're going to need <0.01ms resolution for decent control. I'd be tempted to look to the states where they have a ton of aftermarket / tunable diesel ECU's and see if one can be made to play nicely with a TDV8. Anything's possible but there's a reason the diesel Megasquirt project never really got off the ground. Again, I'm certain it's possible if someone wanted to pay the R&D costs, I'd quite like to give it a go TBH just for the curiosity.
    3 points
  34. Ah yeah I remember now the bench seats are in the shed been out for years now thank you all
    3 points
  35. I loved that diesel Clio! The other thing is reliability for the commute on Monday morning. We've all had Land rovers still in bits at 17:00 on Sunday for a "30 minute" job started on Saturday.
    3 points
  36. Playtime...... Regards Stephen
    3 points
  37. So, this is what the jig is actually for not mine as this is the coupe and restored but this pic is an example of its intended use:
    3 points
  38. I dont really understand your point. I have the jig anyway for another project repairing a bodyshell so just thought I would use it for this. It will help with painting the new chassis and because its on wheels I can move it around. This is just the start of a build thread. I have no intention of building onto the chassis while on the jig, its not meant to take that weight. Once the chassis is painted I will start stripping the 110 and refurbing the panels. Once the 110 is down to running gear I will transfer that to the new chassis (off the jig) and then rebuild the body. This will all be slow so having the chassis on the jig means it can easily be pushed out of the way and stuck in a corner until I need it. Where it was it was blocking access to the side of the shed. For storing it, take the bottom bars off and the jig will occupy a small amount of space.
    3 points
  39. So this Jig came from Ade Foreman - https://en-gb.facebook.com/groups/282852072088530/ Like I said, its for another project and designed for holding an empty bodyshell so you can twirl it round for easy repairs. I just thought it would be useful for the chassis painting since I already had it. Its already serving a purpose as the chassis was in the way in the workshed and now I can move it around. I am very lucky with the workshop. Its huge - can get three cars abreast in it at the end you can see in the photos and work around them. The best thing is that when you are finished at the end of a day you just shut the doors!
    3 points
  40. The powers of the forum at work: for my 250 mile trip on Thursday I actually put the spare tyre back in the Range Rover. Checked pressure and everything! For today's trip with the trailer I'm even gonna include the jack! 🙃
    3 points
  41. Once when working under my LR in a tarmacadam carpark the tiny detent ball and spring flew out of my socket extension bar. Being obstinate I decided to look for it. I found the ball but gave up on the spring. Peed off I put the ball back in the bar. A year later I was back under another LR in the same spot and found the spring but can't put it back as the ball won't come out now!!
    3 points
  42. For regular punctures, sticky tyre plugs work very well if you have a pump or compressor to air the tyre back up. Used them loads in Africa and just came across a wheel & tyre in the workshop I repaired with a plug in north Africa 14 years ago- still fully inflated. Used one of those plugs and a self tapper to fix a big fuel tank leak once as well - useful things to carry.
    3 points
  43. Bit like the telly some repeats only difference being its the front axle Marking out and cutting out cleaning up and drilling tacked into position regards Stephen
    3 points
  44. As we're on the subject of batteries, i bought a Numax 072 for my series 3 more than 15 years ago, it's been allowed to go dead flat (radio drain) on many occasions, sometimes for whole winters. Despite that, it still holds a good charge and cranks the series over pretty strong, even when the fuel has drained back and it needs to spin over a fair bit. I'm so impressed with it that i'll only fit Numax batteries to my cars now.
    3 points
  45. Here's an interesting thing. Blew a fuse the other day while fettling some electrics on the 110. Distinctly heard it go 'pop'. But when I checked I still had 12v output. So I carried on sorting out, took the car for a drive only to find the circuit would only operate intermittentley. So went back home and checked through everything. That's when I found that although the fuse had blown it had failed in such a way that it reconnected. Driving along caused the circuit to jiggle open and then closed again. You can see in the photo a slight blackening of the fuse and that the wire has 'slumped'. It's a funny old world!
    3 points
  46. Slightly bigger piece of equipment acquired today 3t Bradbury Mk3 "wheel alignment spec" comes with wheels free, two jacking beams and the swivelly plate things for the steering wheels as well, all for a few hundred cash. Had some head scratching - quickly figured out how to dismantle the auxiliary posts but then came some head scratching on how to remove the platform from the powered pole. For reference if you remove the control box then there's a sneaky 13mm bolt which holds the outer cover to the hydraulic ram. Once you've undone that you can lift up the outer cover enough to unbolt the two bars that actually pull up the cables.
    3 points
  47. Slightly off topic but related, have you noticed how many new cars have bright LED indicators but the fronts are totally invisible in daylight as they are located next to the daytime headlights!
    3 points
  48. ...LR had a common utility platform . The new pretender is purely a marketing choice in business direction , the OTR price for an option packed "110" bears no relationship to utility and is firmly aligned with fashionable lifestyle . Less gear oil and more beard oil..... Steve
    3 points
  49. Presumably less than 8m wide or it wouldn’t be able to get out without gates
    3 points
  50. I call bull****. Something else would have been behind it and the rag is too lazy and too unprofessional to find out the real story, going for an easy rant piece that wind up their readers.
    3 points


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