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  1. At last weekends LR show we treated ourselves to a Wolf ambulance from Withams. I'm planning on having it delivered asap but can anybody help me with the process from there? I understand I need to: 1. Get it insured. Footman James have said no, Lancaster are going to call back tomorrow and Adrian Flux have quoted (sensible). Any others to try? 2. Book an MOT and drive it there 3. Hopefully bring it home MOT'd 4. DVLA paperwork...... Any ideas? What do I need to fill in? Can I register it as a camper (my plan is to convert) Is it viable to convert to 12v? If so i'll have a load of 24v parts for sale!
    23 points
  2. Has anyone put power steering into their FC 101 that does not involve cutting into the front of the chassis. I know most Disco 1 and 2, P38 and 110 boxes can be used but involve cutting into the chassis. I am not prepared to cut into the chassis - drill holes, weld yes but not cut bits out of it. I have checked a Jeep Wrangler box and it would fit where the original box is without too much modification BUT there is a major issue in that the output shaft turns the wrong way . So if anyone has power steering on their 101 does not involve cutting the chassis please post up how it was done. Thanks Garry
    19 points
  3. What do you think about this late Series 3 109? Outwardly ex military but with plenty of civvy touches [CL version?] http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/272113985357?ssPageName=STRK%3AMESELX%3AIT&_trksid=p3984.m1555.l2649
    19 points
  4. Hi, some of you might know i got myself a pulse ambulance. Can anyone tell me if the Diffs in the front and rear axles are standard rover 24 spline. I know they are 24 spline but would they just be called "rover" ? Would i just be able to bolt in a TrueTrack destined for a "Rover 24" TA Neill
    17 points
  5. hi, I have ex mod 110 td 1991 rolling chassis project which was a van td, at the stage now where I want to fit exhaust system on it, I know I will have to alter the down pipe to fit discovery 200tdi engine I've put in it as I did with my 90, I want to make it into a station wagon but which is the correct exhaust system and part numbers would be a good help thks dd
    17 points
  6. Evening guys, haven't been in the Landy world for a bit, but I am now back with a new addition to the family. New challenge for me after being used to the 3.9 V8, now I need to familiarise myself with the 2.5 N/A diesel. So far so good (it's only been two days!! ) She was Army fire service, someone decided to off-road her for a wee while, but thankfully I got my hands on her before it went on too long. I'm going to keep her as original as possible and over the years and bring her back up to a well,deserved standard. ( it'll take time but can't wait!) Already knew about the cold start procedure and works very well. Very little smoke on start up and after a gear change for the first 5 mins there's a little bit of smoke. Clears after that. High low range seem to be fine (steep driveway) although I don't know how to get into diff lock. I was advised the bulb may need replaced for it too. All dash lights work, already taken the Sh*t sports steering wheel off and put the original back on. Fan works but I think I could blow faster ha! All lights work and are military spec. ( I really like them) every single thing seems to work. It's been painted a desert sand but my intention is to go NATO green. I prefer this to the fire service red. So just thought I'd introduce the new addition the the best landy forum around.
    16 points
  7. Hi, thinking of getting me a 130 Ambulance. lots of questions... is it a class 4 MOT? Whats its GVW? Does the 24v cause issues. Can i get rid of it? Can I insure it at a normal place? anything thats a RPITA to carry on using one? I think getting it registered is pretty easy once I got the MOT. Similar to when we brought Matilda home after the trip. So other than the insurance and MOT are there any "living with one" issues. e.g. are the spares pretty much the same? I presume normal 130 springs and shocks and general consumables like hub bearings and stuff. Thanks Neill ps feeling like a newbee again..........
    16 points
  8. I googled for hours to try and fix this and finally I found something useful. To reset a locked out Eberspacher D5LC (may work on other models) all you need to do I short out two wires. You do not need to buy a 701 or 801 controller or take it to a dealer. 25 1688 50 00 / 12V and 25 1689 50 00 / 24V in versions R0,R1,R2,R3,R4 are confirmed to work. Although you need to short the wires for longer time on the R3 and R4 models of ECU. Up to 5 seconds for the R3,R4 and up to 2 seconds for the R0,R1,R2. To do this try to start the unit as normal. This will not work as its locked out however you will get an illuminated Green LED in the middle of the dial. With the Green LED illuminated short out the two pins as per the diagram below. Do not remove the wires just short them out where they are. The heater should immediately start up if the duration of short is long enough. Mine took 3 seconds maybe as its an R4 Remove the short as soon as the heater starts up The green light may blink the last error code whilst the heater is running Let the heater run for a good few minutes and then allow it to shut down as normal by turning the control knob to off position Allow it to fully cool down and shutdown Power cycle the heater and then attempt a fresh restart. The green light should be steady with no blink codes and it should now be unlocked. The symptoms of a lockout for me was upon turning on the heater the fan didn't blow and the unit did not start. The green LED was steady indicating no fault codes and no matter what I did it would not go into start-up procedure. This seems typical of a lock-out. All I did was have a low fuel tank and this locked it out.
    15 points
  9. If anyone has read my posts you will understand that i am new to having a Landy (and loving it) but even though i have a new battery i am finding the starting of engine not great and seems to be taking longer and longer to start. mine has a choke which someone has said is unusable......is this true? i have also been advised to check the glow plugs and change if necessary anyone got any suggestions the correct starting process and mine doesnt have a light on dash like other diesels do.......probably because its an ex-MOD
    15 points
  10. Just wondering if there are any Farmer's Boys who are members here.
    15 points
  11. OK guys, if you have a light stone coloured vehicle what colour is it declared as on your V5? Yellow or beige?
    15 points
  12. First release! http://www.mod-sales.com/direct/vehicle/,25,/77257/Land_Rover.htm
    15 points
  13. did you buy the locking diff in the end?
    14 points
  14. Is it possible to use the clansman FFR antena mount used ont he LWTs origininaly etc with a conventional CB ? so it looks original ihs but use a Cb with it ?
    14 points
  15. Hi guys I am new to this forum and was hoping somebody can help me. My 2.25 diesel is not Goni g into glow mode anymore when I turn key 3/4 turn. No click in module. So my questions - is there a fuse for that function I can't find it - what could be the issue Any help would be appreciated so I know where to start to look..
    14 points
  16. Trying to find out what these are - I think from a Towed Rapier - can anyone tell me if this is similar to any other trailer hubs?
    14 points
  17. Yes the ambulances are definitely better with a bit of weight in the back to bring the CoG down. With all the fittings stripped out and bare in the back mine was markedly different, less lean, more slide
    14 points
  18. You know you are addicted to Land Rovers when.......... your local independent dealer calls you looking for spares.
    13 points
  19. Hello, 1st post on here as I am hoping someine can help me? I have a widetrack trailer and have started to refurbish it. I have stripped the leaf springs and removed the damaged spring bushes. They are not the same as Series spring buhes. Does anyone know what they are from? They measure 5/8" ID, 1 3/8" OD, 2 11/16" long. Thank you
    13 points
  20. Recently released by the government. Get your copies now! https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/502705/FOI2016-00702_2320-D-128-711_Final.pdf I met a chap from Hobsons once who said they had had a contract to convert 50 ROW spec Defenders to 1998 spec (looms, connectors, fuel lines, etc), just so that they could homogenise the part numbers (which sounded a bit barmy). Taking a look at that manual with all its NATO stock numbers, etc. it makes me understand completely!
    13 points
  21. Hi, Wondering if anyone has had any experience of fitting Jackable Rock/Tree (protector) Sliders onto their 110 FFR. The side lockers are overhanding the area at the moment and I have read on some US sites where they have cut the bottom of the locker doors a bit to get them to fit but wondered if anyone has done this is in the UK or can recommend a supplier? Thanks Taffia
    13 points
  22. Is this the one that's also appearing on Facebook for £3000? Looks very very similar
    13 points
  23. To add the above, the 101 manual steering box is a bit of a weak point, the ball bearings can corrode or shear and the races pit until they fail and the column unwinds instead of steering, it happened to me! I t was years ago when spares were still obtainable easily. You can machine the column and put proper bearings in but it's a fair bit of work.
    13 points
  24. Hi gents, well I've been offline for quite some time because I've been focussed on a new series I was hinting about on and off for ages. It's finally live after a year of earnest work. Hope it's appropriate to post it and hope you like it...\ George
    12 points
  25. Again, please let me shed some light on the true situation regarding testing in hospital labs by removing any current politics. I work for one of the largest clinical diagnostics companies in the PCR section. The virus is detected (from swabs taken from the nose and throat) by PCR. Not all hospital labs are set up to do this specialist test. Let me assure you that the company I work for (and others) and NHS England have been putting additional capacity for this type of testing in place all throughout the summer as well additional biomedical scientist staff being retrained from other areas of pathology to do this testing. Most labs can only process a few thousand tests a day - a limitation of the technique of PCR. The PCR test is not quick but it is highly sensitive and specific. It can take anywhere between 6 and 2 hours from sample in to result out. This is because the sample itself can not undergo PCR straight away. Firstly the sample must be deactivated by heat or chemical treatment so it is safe for the lab staff to handle. This deactivated sample must be extracted - that is the virus (if present) chemically broken open (lysis) to release the RNA and then purified to remove it from substances that may interfer with the test. This "extracted" sample then can undergo the PCR test. If an analyser goes down (they are not designed to run 24/7 for months on end doing just one type of test) then the lab find it very difficult to catch up. They cannot accept more samples and therefore if you require a test you will not be able to get swabbed during this period, other than being offered a swab potentially miles away from your home. This is what happens at the moment when a hospital lab needs more equipment: NHS England decide if that lab in that geographical area needs the additional capacity over another area (the instruments and tests are in very limited supply as global demand is massive). The order is placed and it takes between 4-6 weeks to get the instrument shipped, delivered, alteration work to the lab (additional power supply, IT network points, moving walls, shelves benches etc) completed and the instrument placed in the lab. A further week or maybe 2 elapses whilst an engineer (in between dealing with breakdowns elsewhere) to install, calibrate and comission the instrument ready for use. Lab staff then take about 1 week to be trained and evaluate the test (to prove it works in their lab by testing known panels). They then get the green light to use the instrument for clinical diagnostic use. Fortunately it is not possible for any old idiot to set up a lab and start turning our tests, it is quite rightly a heavily regulated environment and a lab cannot just start a new type of test without providing evidence the test is reliably working without contamination or producing false results as a result of the lab staff not using the test and handling the sample correctly. To run the test, the instruments use >95% Ethanol, lysis buffers, wash buffers, elution buffers, RNase free water, SARS-CoV-2 primer/probes, control material, 1,000s and 1,000s and 1,000s of disposable pipette tips and loads more other consumable plasticwear. If any one of these items is in limited supply then the testing can not run at full capacity and decisions have to be made as to where to send the limited consumables as to best serve the hardest hit areas where testing demand is needed most. PCR is the gold standard of testing because it looks directly for the viral RNA (or DNA for some other viruses), it can detect as little as <100 bits or copies of viral RNA in 1ml of sample. The rapid tests that are talked about are starting to come through but so far the sensitivity of these tests lags far behind that of PCR which is why they are not being used. Antibody testing is different and is not used to diagnose a current infection. At the moment we don't know what having antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 means exactly so this testing has dropped off. Some people thought if they tested positive for antibodies they were immune so went back to life as normal, making the problem worse. I hope this illustrates that no matter what your political opinion and no matter who was running the country - nothing regarding testing would be different today in the middle of this pandemic. NHS pathology labs have been shaped by years of policy across several governments to consolidate testing to a few specialist labs (which in many ways makes sense and saves the NHS a lot of money). It is called the Carter review if you are interested and outlined how the NHS could save £0.2 billion by consolidating pathology.
    12 points
  26. It has been a while since I last owned an ex mil vehicle and wondered where the vehicle history records are now kept? I used to get them from the museum of military transport in Beverley but I understand that has long since closed down. I tried EMLRA in the past and never, ever, had a response on anything I asked about, even when attempting to join.
    12 points
  27. exmod 1991 Salisbury rear drum brakes converted to discs everything when fine but o/s rear half shaft seemed to be wrong one inserted hell of a game to get it out had to grind flange off which had been welded on remove drums then knocked it out back through the stub axle it had a raised area which I presume for oil seal but the shaft it self seemed to thick anyway thicker than the other half shaft on n/s so now I need a half shaft part number read else where that thee original drum brake shaft would be ok, dd
    12 points
  28. hi can anyone help me with a part number for the oil temp sender that fits into the sump on a V8?....................................many thanks
    12 points
  29. Driven: New Defender - On & Off Road. Is it a Pretender? Where should someone start when reviewing the new Land Rover Defender? It seems to be such a contentious subject. And no matter what your views are, you will likely end up truly upsetting one camp or another. Well, let us start with something descriptive. The model under review is a ‘First Edition’ 110. Being as this is the UK it comes fairly loaded with kit and only one engine option, being the 2.0 D240 turbo diesel, along with the only gearbox choice offered on the new Defender. The 8-speed ZF unit that adorns so many modern vehicles. With a retail price of approx £60,000 it is certainly not aimed at being a budget 4x4. On face value the Defender 110 seems very similar to the Discovery 5, which is also offered for similar money with this same engine and gearbox combo. And is built on a similar variation of the D7 platform. The Discovery 5 has a marginally shorter wheelbase, but quite similar in most dimensions. The skeptic in me, would ask. Is the Defender little more than a mild styling change from the D5, just offered in two alternative wheelbases? Or are there more fundamental engineering differences between them? While on the subject of value, looking back at some old figures and inflation rates. I believe the new Defender is pitched at about the same price and market point or slightly higher, than a 1999 Range Rover p38 was. Which at the time was the most luxurious and top of the range model offered by Land Rover. How things have changed. As the ‘old’ Defender has been cited as a great British icon many times over the years. I think reviewing the new models styling is of paramount importance before we jump into any kind of road test. Personally I’m still a little undecided about the looks. From some angles it looks rather frumpy, even awkward. Yet from other angles it looks quite good. I do think the design is rather colour sensitive, which also includes the colour of the roof. And it does have some nice styling touches to it here and there. But here is the biggy, it just doesn’t look very “Land Rover Defender” at all. I can see no real trace of the 70 years of heritage that I would be expecting a vehicle such as this to be portraying. It is most odd. I can see rather a lot of “Discovery” in the design. From the rear tailgate to the alpine lights, stables of the Discovery 1 and 2 era. And in general shape, profile and silhouette it seems to have a strong family tie with the Discovery 3 and 4 models. Ultimately it is completely lacking the classic lines that have made the Series and Defender models so iconic over the years. For me, as a green blooded lifelong Land Rover fanatic. I find this somewhat disappointing. Inside is much the same. I actually like the interior a lot, it has some very nice design touches. Such as the grab handles for the rear passengers, to make getting in and out easier. There is also a good amount of storage cubbies and some well placed USB ports. But again oddly, there seems to be nothing very “Defender” about the interior. I know there is a big stamped DEFENDER in the dash, but the old ones never had this. Nor did they have stylised door cards with purposeful exposed allen head bolts. The tray in the dash is a nice touch, but the dash in general just seems as though it has been designed by someone who once heard Land Rover made a vehicle called a Defender. But had never actually bothered to sit in one. Also, from where you sit, to where the front of the vehicle ends. You’d kind of expect there to be a V12 under the bonnet. You really are a long long way back. With a windscreen rake that shares nothing with any past Series or Defender models. That said, if I have complaints with the interior, it is not this. The cabin is a nice place to be, it is light and airy, the large glass roof is very pleasant. And the surfaces feel good to the touch. The door top and dash appear to have a nice soft touch feel which I really liked. Although as I found out later on, this material did not take kindly to mud at all. In general the interior is a triumph to behold. Even with the cloth seats, although the drivers one did look a little stained and had some early signs of wear. There is however a vastly bigger problem with the interior. Or more specifically, looking out from the interior. The new Defender is blessed with the worst blind spots I have yet come across in any vehicle. And since passing my test in 1997, I have driven a great many. There are several major concerns here. Firstly, the mirrors are pretty hopeless. Something that any past Defender owners will likely be shocked to hear, as the mirrors on the old models are brilliant. These new ones are not a patch on the old ones. For me, I also found that to adjust the mirrors correctly, quite a bit of glass became completely hidden by the mirror cowling, thus making the poor mirrors even worse. And as for the blind spot, when you include the large A-pillar and mirror locations, they become quite a burden. Never have I been unable to see down the road when turning left out of a T-junction. But this is a party trick the new Defender seemed far too well versed in! In fairness, I am not the tallest person in the world. So I did have the seat quite far forward. Well, we can’t all be strapping 6 footers can we. However, even moving the seat back a small amount for a more average sized person, I do not see how such a major issue would be easily overcome. While there is more that could be said about the interior, I think this is plenty for now. So let us head out on to the road and see what it goes like. As mentioned, this is the 240bhp version, which from a 2.0 litre diesel engine is quite impressive. And I’ll be honest, I thought the engine was a complete gem. It sounded pretty good, revved and went very very well. The Defender will even pick its skirt up and move at a fairly rapid rate if so desired. I’m not for a moment suggesting it was setting the world on fire performance wise and I’m sure if you were used to the grunt of a TDV8 found in past Land Rover products, you’d probably find the D240 somewhat underwhelming. But for what it is, I was impressed. That said, I do suspect that the base model 200hp D200 variant may feel a little underpowered in such a big heavy heavy vehicle. My test mpg was approx 24mpg (Imperial). Sadly though, there is some bad news. Well not bad, more catastrophic. Under some conditions the gearbox is the most dreadful, awful gearbox I’ve ever driven. Once rolling it went well enough and complimented the engine. The gear shifts were also smooth. The problem is twofold. It seems to be completely dimwitted at times and leaves you quite literally sitting in the road not moving. There are two flavours of this. The first is from standstill, if you pull away normally, sometimes it would do nothing, I’m not entirely sure if this was the gearbox or the throttle. But the engine doesn’t rev and you don’t really move. Then it will suddenly lurch forward with little to no warning. This makes some kinds of normal road use quite horrid. Also despite being an automatic, it seemed to have an unwillingness to want to crawl when you lift off the brake pedal. The same being true for reverse. I suspect you could get used to it with enough seat time. But it would always be horrid. I found the only way to pull out from a T-junction was to prod the throttle quite hard, then as soon as the vehicle started to move, lift right off, then reapply some throttle. I can only presume, gone are the days of smooth driving? Despite this horrible oddity, it gets worse. At other times you also get what appears to be a completely dead throttle pedal or lack of response from the gearbox. Usually on 90 degree turns, such as turning into a side road, or pulling out from a Give Way where you could keep rolling at 10-20mph. You go to accelerate in a normal fashion and you get nothing in return. Should you have been foolish enough to pull out in front of something, it will give you quite the puckering I can tell you. This problem is compounded by not being consistent either, because at other times under very similar circumstances, there is no delay at all and it’ll shoot off like a scalded cat! I decided to experiment a bit with the gearbox and found that normal D or Sport mode made no real difference to this behaviour. And yet there was still one more party trick in store. If you come to a complete standstill, such as being at a roundabout or a junction, don’t hold it on the brake and don’t build any revs. Just stamp on the throttle pedal. My normal expectation would be for the vehicle to move away briskly and swiftly. In the Defender it does not move at all, it waits, then waits a bit longer. Then it eventually decides that it will move. The delay is simply enormous! To the point that it is comically concerning. Never have I driven anything like this. If you were to give yourself a one, two, three countdown. And went to wide open throttle on three. You’d get to the count of five before you had any form of meaningful forward progression. I do not know if this problem extends to other vehicles with this powertrain or if the petrol Defender would exhibit the same. But this singular major issue would be enough to turn me away from wanting to buy and own one of these. Hopefully it is just something software related and can be reprogrammed, but it would appear to be a deliberate design choice in how the Defender is intended to drive on the road. Put frankly, I know the ‘Defender’ is being brought into the so-called “Digital age”. However, I still prefer certain controls to have a degree analog feel to them. On road ride and handling are very good. There is no denying, the all independent suspension setup does iron the bumps out very well. I wouldn’t say it is night and day difference from a good live axle vehicle. But it is certainly better. Handling too, it is level, grippy and direct with good steering. And will allow you to hustle the large vehicle along small lanes at quite a rate of Knots and with relative ease. For me however, I think this is one of the biggest issues with a vehicle wearing the Defender nameplate. It just doesn’t feel like a 4x4 to drive. And that is a real shame. In fact, it feels like a large estate car. That just happens to be a bit taller. It therefore feels somewhat more boaty than a well sorted car. But completely lacks the sense of occasion that you would expect from something calling itself a Defender. Anyone who has spent a lot of wheel time in a traditional Defender, Range Rover Classic or even an XJ Jeep Cherokee. Will be able to tell you, they all feel “special” to drive. There is just something about them. Something that makes you smile, something that is incredibly satisfying. And something that is very enjoyable. They are an event to pilot. And therefore an event to own and a pleasure to go out for a drive in, every single time you get in them. The Defender by comparison feels supremely capable, but somewhat sterile. To the point that once the novelty of the interior styling has worn away. You could almost be driving any other generic SUV. It really is lacking a personality, which is odd. As its forebear had such a strong one. This isn’t to say it is a bad car, it is not. It is a very good car, but that is perhaps the crux of the problem. It just feels like a car. Let us talk about suspension for a bit. A topic that many may find uninteresting, but one that I personally find quite fascinating. And with any off road vehicle, should be a point of major discussion. The Defender uses Land Rover’s trailed, tested and proven cross linked air suspension. Which hails from the introduction of the Discovery 3 model, way back in 2004. The current system is an evolution of that setup and is found on multiple current Land Rover products. It is a very good system, although one could argue it is an expensive and complex way of achieving similar off road performance to that of a live axle. With the aim being of the more car like on-road experience. A trade-off that is very good for some classes and types of vehicles I’m sure. But one I’m not yet fully convinced of for a Defender model. To give the suspension a little test, I put a ramp in front of the drivers side front wheel and the passenger side rear wheel. A competent 4wd vehicle should have no problem driving in a controlled manner to the top of the ramps and back down. And it will enable us to see how the suspension reacts. As this was done on a grippy surface I decided to use low range and the ‘Rock Crawl’ Terrain Response mode, which not only locks the centre differential. But also raises the ride height of the vehicle. Sadly, this vehicle wasn’t equipped with the optional rear Diff Locker. The Rock Crawl mode should ensure a minimal amount of wheelslip and good throttle control. The Defender drove up on the ramps no bother at all. Some very minor scrabbling of the left front wheel on the concrete, but nothing to be concerned with. Thankfully the vehicle also seemed to be very controlled on the throttle and smooth to drive. The results speak for themselves really. Very impressive for an all independent setup. However it comes as no surprise, as we know a 16 year old Discovery 3 would do equally well at such a test. Still, it is nice to see how much “flex” there is and how much clearance. Of note however there are three things I’d like to mention here. Firstly, note the ride height gap (from the top of the tyre, to the bottom of the wheel arch), on the drivers front and passengers rear tyres. While the gap has reduced from sitting level, neither tyre is “stuffed” up into the arch as you would get on a live axle vehicle. The independent suspension just doesn’t compress in the same way as a live axle can. The drivers rear and passenger front wheels are firmly on the ground. Which really demonstrates just how good the cross linked suspension setup is. And it is clear that there is plenty of droop in the suspension. However, my hunch is that despite this super performance on the ramps, the lack of compression will result in the all independent Defender, lifting its wheels off the ground more so than a live axle vehicle would do. Secondly, and maybe of more importance. There is no driver feedback at all when driving onto the ramps and more surprisingly, also when reversing off of them. Because independent suspension only moves one wheel not the entire axle and is intended to isolate the rest of the car from the movement. You simply cannot easily feel the vehicle climbing the ramps and even less so when descending them. If I did not have someone spotting for me. I would have had no idea when I had reached the top of the ramps. Off road I suspect such isolation from what the vehicle is doing and the terrain is unlikely to be as good as it may sound and may make you work a lot harder to get over some obstacles, for the simple fact you can’t really tell what is going on when you are sitting in the driver's seat. Lastly, is one of visibility. I know the new Defender has an array of very clever cameras. But sometimes you don’t want to be looking down at the screen in the middle of the dash. You want the window open and to be able to lean out. And due to the design of the new Defender, it is almost impossible to do this. I found I could not even see the front wheel from the driver's seat. And even sticking my camera out at arms length from the window, I could not see that there was a ramp sitting right in front of the driver's front tyre. A trait that further removes the driver from the environment and isolates them even more so. A trait that I feel may be fitting for some vehicles, but is completely at odds on a vehicle bearing the name of Defender. Now to the off road test section. It is such a shame about the weather, it is really wet and muddy out. Two days back it was dry, sunny and over 30 degrees. The new Defender is only equipped with road biased tyres. Therefore limiting traction on the slippery wet mud and grass. Had it been dry, I would have been able to test it in more severe cross axle situations and had another location I would have used as well. As this isn’t a tyre test, the off road test is a little limited to where the tyres could get us. That said, it was a worthy experiment. The test course is by no means extreme, but it is more severe than your average green lane. And therefore will give the suspension and traction systems a work out. From the Terrain Response I selected ‘Mud & Ruts’ as that would seem to fit the description of the terrain. For a vehicle with a 119” wheelbase, I thought it did very well. With such a long wheelbase I would expect it to belly out due to the relatively poor breakover angle a long wheelbase usually gives you. And sure enough it did indeed beached itself and hit the underside a bit. But despite this, I am still impressed. And for such a road biased vehicle, the Defender is certainly capable on such terrain. But given how well we know a Discovery 3 can drive off road, this is of no real surprise really. As expected however, it did end up with wheels in the air quite a lot, which just goes to show, despite how well it appeared to ‘flex’ on the test ramps. The independent setup still struggles to keep the tyres in contact with the ground the same way a live axle 4x4 can. And I think this contributes to one of my biggest observations off road. That while the independent suspension rides better on the road and on rough farm tracks. Once the going gets a bit tougher and it starts lifting wheels off the ground and working the traction control systems, it actually is less comfortable off road than a live axle vehicle. As luck would have it, we were able to directly compare to a 1999 Range Rover Vogue SE. The old Range Rover is the last of the live axle Range Rover’s and uses a setup unique to the p38a model. It is also equipped with 4 wheel traction control, a 4 speed automatic gearbox, with a manual override button to keep it in gear and lock the torque converter up. Back to back, the Range Rover just felt more sure footed, more comfortable with more control. It didn’t want to run away from you, it would hold it speeds on the uneven ground better. And managed to keep all its wheels on the ground. It gave you a more secure feeling overall. The old Range Rover really did give you the sense that you could ‘ford every river and climb every mountain’. The new Defender always had you a little more on edge and required more concentration and more effort. Don’t let this seem as a disjustice for the new Defender. It is still incredibly capable and likely would vastly exceed the off road requirements of many owners. But I’m not convinced that what it has gained (or lost) on road with such a suspension setup is really worth the compromises off road compared to a more traditional 4x4 setup. Which takes me back to my earlier point. If you want a large estate car that has the potential to go up the field. The new Defender is ideal. If however you are wanting an off road 4x4 that feels special to drive. This new model seems to be very wide of the mark. Underneath the new Defender seemed to cope quite well, it is well tucked up. With some strategically placed bash plates. Although the rest of the underside is covered in some kind of fibreboard. My last biggest issue with the new Defender is the Terrain Response system. I know it was revolutionary when introduced. And many a manufacturer has copied the basic idea. However, it is a hugely complex and fiddly system. You really do need to be an expert on the vehicle to have any clue what each mode does. And then you really need to be an expert off road to know which mode to use for which situation. As it isn’t always as obvious as it may seem. For instance, the Mud & Ruts setting seemed to kill the throttle with too much wheelspin, something that was unhelpful in such slippery conditions. To which I’m sure the average punter wouldn’t know what they should do in order to overcome this deficit, such as use a different mode that allows more wheelslip. But this is only part of the problem in the new Defender. In the past Terrain Response and the suspension controls had easy to reach and identify dedicated controls. In the new Defender the controls are somewhat unobvious, semi-hidden behind the gearstick and not very intuitive to use. For example, there is a button for Low Range, but no obvious way to return to High Range. And when selecting different Terrain Settings you sometimes get additional pop up messages or messages being split between the central screen and the dash pod screen. To even activate Terrain Response you have to firstly find a discreetly placed button to turn one of the temperature dials into a control for the Terrain Response. It is almost as if Land Rover don’t really want you using these controls regularly and have made them difficult to get too and use. Some other points of note during the review process. There was a rattle from the rear of the Defender. I think I eventually traced this to some loose trim on the rear tailgate. There was also a vibration rattle in the dash under hard acceleration at around 4000rpm. And sadly during the test it developed a new rattle from the drivers door. All on a vehicle that had only covered 5000 miles. In summary, as impressive and as capable as the new Defender is. It is a complete miss for me. It just seems to have no real Defender qualities about it on pretty much any level. I do wonder if the Defender Sport name should have been used on this model. It would certainly be more fitting with the design, capabilities and styling. If I was to Pretend that this was badged as a Defender SPORT, I would give it 7.5 / 10. The poor blind spots and horrid delay on the gearbox dock major points off. If I was to rate it based on being a Defender, then my score would be 2.5 / 10. It is just too far removed from what one would expect a Defender to be.
    11 points
  30. Rest In peace His Royal Highness The Prince Philip, The Duke of Edinburgh. Condolences to Her Majesty The Queen. Posted for and on behalf of the members of LR4x4.com and its administration & moderation team.
    11 points
  31. Anoraks on standby! As some of you will know, you can decode some Land Rover fastener part numbers into their actual threads & dimensions, like this: BT606106 = Bolt, 3/8 UNF x 1 1/4" Anyway, whilst perusing the S3 Parts book for a few bits and bobs I ended up down quite a rabbit hole and ended up making this: Land Rover / BL fastener part number decoder-o-tron It should get the basics right but I found a lot of previously un-mentioned variations in the parts book so if anyone has their anorak on and feels like filling in the blanks that would be super awesome. Areas of doubt & uncertainty: AB, AC, AD, AE, AR = Drive Screws (self tappers) but not sure on the differences AB,AC,AD imperial (AB6...) are by Screw No. (EG AB606... equals screw with imperial No.6 thread) but no idea of other thread-forms? AJ = Spire nut, not clear on details AK = Captive/spring nut, not clear on details AM = Bolt, "Special", no idea BD = Probably Blanking Plug but no idea on sizing? FX = Nut of some special sort (flanged or jam)? GG = Mudguard screw, only seen one part number so no idea on what's different about this MR = Pop rivet but no idea on size or type NC, ND = Castle nut but unclear on details NK = Captive nut / lokut / rivnut...??? NH, NM, NR = Nut, hex, not clear on detail NN, PN = Rivnut, type/details unclear NY, NZ = Nylock nit, not clear on difference PA, PC, PS = Pins, sizing not clear (very guesswork) RA, RF, RT, RU = Rivets, details unclear SA, SE, SH = Screw, differences unclear SF = Screw, Flanged, different to FS? TD, TE = Studs, very vague on details WA, WB, WC, WD, WP = Washers, what's the difference? WE, WF = Shakeproof washers, details / sizing unclear WK = Cup Washer, very vague on details WL, WM, WS = Spring washers, what's the difference?
    11 points
  32. This is a Land Rover forum, not a conspiracy theorist’s forum - please keep things on topic.
    11 points
  33. Lightweight working for its keep today regards Stephen
    11 points
  34. Just like to wish forum members near and far a very happy Christmas, have only been a member for a short while, although linked by an affinity for Landrovers in their many guises I find the assistance and advice given to what is essentially a faceless stranger for most members, exceptional .I personally should have joined years ago thank you.Whatever your projects or repairs are in 2019 I wish you success and fun in doing them Stephen
    11 points
  35. Can anyone supply me with the part numbers for the roof bars for a Wolf hard top? Previous post has a picture but need some numbers and the guy who provided the picture does not want to reply for some reason. Any one able to help??? Regards Stu
    11 points
  36. New guidance for O/T threads and posts, giving a clear picture of what is acceptable. Please read this link - http://forums.lr4x4.com/index.php?showtopic=73660 Thanks
    11 points
  37. Found this little chap laid just outside my front door about 18:30 last night. Gave him/her some water from a syringe and called the SSPCA The officer was saying they are getting loads of bat rescues at the moment something to do with the weather Anyway before he/she left the little thing had a fly around my kitchen so must be improving regards Stephen
    10 points
  38. I really needed to get out and have a bit of a break. So took the OneTen out for a spin. Found a place for the lunch break.. Met with a group of German / Russian occupied LR's who saw me parked in the shades and asked if they could join me for lunch.. Of course they could and this "lunch meet" ran into the afternoon as we enjoyed the P&Q, talked about life in general and had a good time. Based in Germany, they usually go into RU to visit friends & family but not now. So they made do with a "round the Alps Tour" but found the driving not as much fun as they'd hoped. Always interesting to see how people from fifferent countries can unite when they have LR's in common. We eventually broke up - they are a good bunch and we had a lot of laughs - aswell as some serious talks- and I went up a bit for the night as I'd planned where to sleep. These clouds come from the Suza valley where it is hot and the air goes up and over the dam where the Cenis Reservoir water cools the hot air off and you end up in wet & cold clouds / fog very quickly. You literally see the clouds forming for your eyes while you sit there. Obviously, food was needed so the burner came out. I'd left most of the kitchen home as it was only 1 night away this time so please excuse the messy rear. Next morning it was time to go home again...🙄 All-in-all, some 1,100 kms. - or about 700 miles - in a day and a half without problems. Going into the Alps again in September for a Birthday Bash ($%^$@%^$#^@#^% Virus disclaimer applies...) and that could be very cold... P.S. For the very few that wonder (I doubt it though....) where the OneTen lift up roof is.... In the workshop, awaiting the Mrs. to find time to modify the fabric. Once that is done, it is roof swop day and getting the fabric in. Hope to show some pics late this year but work keeps getting in the way..
    10 points
  39. So some progress with motor cover made myself some billet aluminium out of some scrap I had it's not perfect a couple of air bubbles here and there but it will do the job Getting there new and old side by side fitted just got holes to drill and paint regards Stephen
    10 points
  40. For anyone interested I would also like to give an insight it to the "testing fiasco" in the UK hospitals that has been reported in the news this week and give the facts. I am working for a company who directly supplies and supports hospital laboratories for virology testing. I was in an NHS lab in London this week preparing instruments to do the testing. Various ministers and the press have been comparing our testing to other countries as inadequate and why can't we ramp up the testing as others have done. Here are the reasons: The NHS Pathology laboratories have undergone a large consolidation over the past years to a hub and spoke model under NHSi (improvement). This has reduced year on year the number of labs able to do this sort of molecular test using PCR. The labs left who do have molecular facilities and trained staff have been and are working flat out to meet testing demand. The thing is they don't just have tests, spare equipment and spare staff waiting for a pandemic, they of course have to also do routine testing for STI screening, HIV, Hep C and Hep B viral loads etc. It has also been reported some labs have been told by the government they aren't allowed to test. This is because those labs mostly don't have the right equipment and staff for the PCR test. The government are managing the resources we have to make sure the testing is done where it is needed most ie large cities. Companies like the one I work for have been placing extra equipment in labs and getting them up and running with the test. The laboratory staff have to be trained and then validate the tests to ensure they are passing QC and work with absolute reliability. Highly skilled Biomedical Scientist staff have to be retrained on safely processing the infectious patient samples and using the test. All of this can't just happen overnight. Commercial companies have designed, produced, gained FDA approval for the tests in a record time the likes of which have never been seen. Now we have to manage the distribution with assistance from government to get the tests to where they are needed. The materials required for the tests are correctly refered to as reagents. One government minister tried to explain to the press the above but said the "chemicals are in limited supply". Someone then contacted the chemical industry to ask if chemicals are in short supply. Of course bulk and fine chemicals are not. So the answer came back as such causing further confusion as if someone is not telling the truth. In short despite what the press report and some ministers say. Please be assured that diagnostic companies and NHS Molecular laboratories up and down the UK are working flat out to deliver the testing to those who need it. Antibody tests which are less complex than PCR tests to roll out are now being produced and gaining approval. It is these tests which can determine who has had the infection and is immune. Molecular tests directly detect the viral RNA to diagnose a current acute infection. I hope this clarifies atleast some of the murky water we find ourselves in.
    10 points
  41. You're sharing a forum with Hybrid_From_Hell who can end up in A+E just making a cup of tea and you're wondering how someone could injure themselves working on their car?
    10 points
  42. Hi all, I'm currently rebuilding the LT230T 43D of our Td5 Defender after an issue in the transmission which eventually turned out to be in the front axle. Fortunately I enjoy doing this - I've always wanted to do a gearbox and I can honestly say that it is the best way to learn how it works and how to treat it. I also took the opportunity to make some photographs. Initially because the thing looks very nice - it's almost a pity to have to hide it in the casing - but I also realised that I have never seen comparable images. I intended to post these images later because some things should still be improved, but since a member is currently experiencing issues with his CDL, I figured that I already should post what I have. Presumably a lot of forum members know how it works, but for the others I'll try to explain a bit. Feel free to correct or add. Please mind that I have invested quite some effort in making these - so respect my copyright. This is the complete centre differential with shifting forks and output shafts: Here the forks are removed: and now the output shafts too: The large cylindrical volume is the diff carrier which houses the differential gears. The two large gears are the high gear (smaller) and low gear (larger). They each freely rotate on the shaft and as long as the main gearbox is in gear they're driven continuously by the input shaft through the intermediate gears which are not shown. The set of small teeth with large distance between them - dog teeth - are each part of the large sprocket: In between the dog teeth one can see a more finely splined part with a large grooved ring around it - the high/low gear selector ring. The splined part is fixed to the differential housing, and by shifting the selector ring over the dog teeth of one of the gears, that gear will take the diff housing along in its rotation. In these pictures the ring is between the two large sprockets, so the LT230 is in neutral. If the R380/LT77 would be in gear with the engine running, only the two gears would rotate - the diff housing wouldn't. In the following pictures the assembly is positioned the other way round - left and right are switched (one of the reasons I want to remake some of the images). Half of the diff housing is removed, one can see the actual differential. On the left is now a smaller ring over the splined end of the diff carrier. That's the diff lock selector. Again, you see a set of dog teeth, this time they are part of the output shaft (you can see the shafts below). The shafts can rotate freely, so the small differential gears can do their work in compensating any differences in rotation of both axles. So diff lock is off. Here the diff lock selector has moved over the dog teeth. The shaft is now connected to the diff housing. None of the parts can move or rotate in relation to one another - everything is connected as if it is one piece, so diff lock is on: These are just the output shafts and diff gears. You can see the dog teeth on the left. The spiral at the right drives the speedo cable. And here they are relative to the whole assembly (although the gears should be meshing, the main reason why I want to remake the series). Hope you enjoy it and that it can help some people. Greetings, Joris
    10 points
  43. Ok, So there is a thread on U/J quality in the international forum were people are mentioning short lives of their U/J, and questioning their quality. Of course, a genuine U/J generally lives longer than a cheap replacement. But In my experience, there is more to it. Mainly maintenance; how often do you grease your U/Js? And the next question is than how is it done. Before you all think I teaching you to suck eggs I will expand on this a bit more: Problem I found is that one grease nipple is serving 4 bearings. In reality, this means that the grease tend to find the route with the least resistance. This usually means you are effectively greasing 1 or 2 bearings only. And what about the others? They are dry as a bone and fall apart. To combat this, I thought about it, and came up with a method that I will show you here. It is rather involved, but I have not changed a U/J in 10 years. Here we go: First off, grease as you would normally. You can see which bearing gets grease, as it pours past the seal: The ones that dont get any grease need feeding as well. You can do this by pressing the bearing which has already been greased against the crosspiece like so: This now should stop the flow of grease to the already greased bearing, and find the next passage with the lowest resistance. If you still have other bearings that have no grease coming out, you can add a G-clamp with a nut, to press 2 opposed bearing cups against the cross piece. keep repeating this process until all bearing cups have grease coming out. This process is rather fiddly, but as mentioned, since I started doing it this way, I have had no failures. I have done this with the props on the car and using 2 opposed G-clamps. Also, the blue grease is better in my experience, as it does not go solid like the yellow stuff (which I am using here, unfortunately). Hope that helps, and have fun greasing these things! Daan
    10 points
  44. Like it says in the title really. Got an ex MoD 90 wiring has been "repaired" in the past ?. Whoever the muppet who fancied himself as an auto electrician was, he must have owned shares in red insulating tape. I have indicators, brake lights, front and rear sidelights, headlights on dip, 1 headlight on full (could just be bulb, sealed units). I have lethargic wipers which have normal speed and high speed. The high is in the right place, all other positions are slow. Occassionally they park but 90% of time stopping them is a pull the fuse job. Hazard lights? Eh, no. I also have a full loom of another 90. From look of the spaghetti under the bonnet and behind switches, I think this might be the best option. Is it possible to alter it to suit the military version or do I just go normal 90. Who needs convoy lights anyway. Help or insight appreciated ladies and gentlemen. Rab
    10 points
  45. The front and rear doors were looking tacky, metal frames rusting and slack hinges. Repaired bottom rails with YRM repair sections for S111. Got a pair of DA1070 heavy duty hinges which are marginally larger than the original and foul the door to window trim on the old military defender. Others have packed the hinge to clear the trim but I just ground off the offending small section of the trim. Hinges came in a blue box!! but to be fair to Britpart they are of good quality and no slop in the hinge pin, well pleased. After adjusting the striker plates the three doors close with a clunk rather than the slam bang before the repairs. If I close my eyes I’d think I was closing the door on a Roller !!
    10 points
  46. Malcolm Whitbread used a LHD defender style steering box so the input pointed forwards and then a 90 degree bevel box at bottom of column. The 101 relay is larger than a series unit so should survive having power steering through it and adds an element of further damping so should help improve steering box life when offroading. Cutting and vee-ing the chassis isn't a terribly messy way of doing it, rebuilding the top of the rail over the v would add strength back in and might make it a tad neater.
    10 points
  47. Bought some LR bits from forum member who will remain nameless (Ross) ...to be delivered to me by Mr V8 Freak.... And this is what's waiting Sigh....
    10 points
  48. If you have a standing order to LR4x4.com Please read the info in this link http://forums.lr4x4....772#entry727634 & act on it to reset your standind order payments.
    10 points


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