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  1. FridgeFreezer

    FridgeFreezer

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    Bowie69

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    Gazzar

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  4. miketomcat

    miketomcat

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Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/25/2018 in all areas

  1. 9 points
    I have to say it amuses me when the foreigners on here apologise for their English. We as a nation are ignorant when it comes to languages but I guess that comes from being one of the more commonly used. I say you guys rock for bothering to use a forum in a non native tongue and I have to remind myself that I'm the one that is deficient in this area. Long may you continue to grace us with your presence and input. Thank you Mike
  2. 8 points
    Well, that wasn't exactly the plan, but it's what happened πŸ€¦β€β™‚οΈ Popped over to the UK for New Year's to have a play at Bunny Lane, and combine it with the classic car show at Brooklands. Arrived at Bunny Lane around lunch after missing our ferry by 5 minutes because we were sat at border control in Calais for an hour with nobody bothering to work Bit miffed to have gotten up at 3 in the morning to then be waiting an hour for the next one... Unhooked the trailer with the Lotus on it, swapped the tyres and set off. Car seemed to work well, put on a bit of a show of V8 loudness and flying mud in places, all good. Then came across a little hill with a big rock in it. We were thinking maybe I'd hit the diff, no biggie, just do it slowly and see what happens. First try stopped just shy of getting up it, but no diff hitting, so all good. Backed up, gave it a bit more throttle (but not much), went up the hill, and... landed on the belly. Seemed to make a bit more noise that usual. Backed up, saw oil, instantly stopped the engine and got out to have a look. This happened: Must've hooked the handbrake drum on the rock... Drove back to the parking lot with loud crunchy noises, and breaking our record of breakage, now at half an hour on the site! Obviously a bit of an issue, as that was the tow car... so got the Lotus off the trailer, put the RR on, and started unbolting as much as possible. By the time the site closed, we had it all loose, but left a few bolts in the crossmember and transfer box so it wouldn't fall out when being towed. @miketomcat offered to tow it to his home behind the Ibex, which we gladly took him up on. But we still had to source a replacement box, because this wasn't going to be fixed with JB weld... Mike and @FridgeFreezer started calling around, when Piers showed up (not sure if he has an account on here?) and mentioned "oh, I have a P38 in a shed somewhere". It quickly became apparent that would be the only option, as everyone that could have one was closed until after New Year's, and the nearest one on eBay was in Bath... Fridge drove up to Piers' shed, which turned out to be many sheds filled to the brim with all kinds of treasure. And in the back of one, looking like it must've been there for 50 years (time travelling P38?), was a manual diesel P38 that had been put in there with a seized engine. Crawled under it, screamed at the amount of spiders, but decided it was our only option. Then realised it probably wouldn't fit because it's a manual, and mine's an auto, but some research showed that only the input gear should be different, and can be swapped fairly easily. Right then, undo many rusty bolts, preferably while minimally upsetting the spiders. Did I mention I really, really don't like spiders? Especially in cramped spaces. Anyway, after about 4 hours, we had it pried off the rusted output shaft and carried into Fridge's car. Made it to the hotel a little past midnight, and dropped like a brick. Including the time difference, that was a 22 hour day. Next day, off to Mike's place, to get the broken one out. That went fairly alright, apart from some exhaust studs at the downpipe breaking off, but we got those drilled and tapped. Inspecting it off the car, turns out it was cracked almost all the way around. The bit between @Escape's fingers is the only bit still attached: Still had the issue of the differing input gear on the other case though. But splitting the broken one open revealed that it should be fairly easy to just swap the output side from the new case onto the input side from the old case, without having to press the input gear out. That went smoothly except for one slight niggle that won't be named Had it all back together around 5, in time for New Year's celebrations, and made it to Brooklands the next day with the Lotus to put it among a bunch of very, very special cars there. And we made it home! Without too many strange crunchy noises. I'm fairly sure if I ever need to be declared clinically insane, this thread should count as plenty proof Thanks again to everyone involved for all the help! The only reason we can risk to go to the UK to do daft stuff like this is because of awesome friends that go above and beyond to help us out if (when) we break stuff.
  3. 8 points
    Just like to wish forum members near and far a very happy Christmas, have only been a member for a short while, although linked by an affinity for Landrovers in their many guises I find the assistance and advice given to what is essentially a faceless stranger for most members, exceptional .I personally should have joined years ago thank you.Whatever your projects or repairs are in 2019 I wish you success and fun in doing them Stephen
  4. 8 points
    Without pictures it didn't happen so...... Mike
  5. 7 points
    I think Britpart sell head gaskets in packs of ten.
  6. 6 points
    The way things are going a complete spare p38 stored in the south of England might be a good idea. Mike
  7. 6 points
    Just to help a liitle i have marked ALL the water ingress points in BLACK for you and anyone else who is interested!?! There, i think that about covers it!?!
  8. 6 points
    And finally.................................... I have a Q registration number. V5 to follow in about 2 weeks. Mike
  9. 5 points
    Been ages since I've used a series other than road testing customer cars, but as I had to break the 110 I keep in Africa and as Defender prices have gone through the roof there, I thought I'd try my hand at a spot of retro overlanding and picked up a nice S2a 109 safari station wagon as a temporary stopgap - sight unseen, and had it delivered to a mates. Apart from a couple of offensive additions (laminate floorboard dash, quickly ripped out & brown velvet Toyota cressida front seats) I hit lucky and it's remarkably original with barely a dent and almost no rust. New rad, water pump, engine tune up and an oil change later and ran it up to Mozambique waiting for the first round of spanner time.... which never came! Absolutely love the 2.6 six cylinder engine - torque not far off a tdi, silky smooth and got over 22mpg overall - not bad for a 50s engine and 80p/litre for petrol it doesn't matter too much. Compared to the old 2.25 petrol or diesel it was a pleasure to drive - no slowing down on hills! Great through soft sand as well, at one point I helped tow a speedboat through very deep coastal sand tracks, passing a brand new Range Rover that was bogged to the floorpan. Well after making it to Moz without a breakdown we chanced a trip through Kruger (the wuffly engine was great for game viewing, rattly tdis & td5s scare the animals off) and Swaziland - whole trip I never had to fix anything, don't think I ever had that with a defender 😏 but did miss a bit of tool time. Great journey and great to reconnect with some of those early landy features.
  10. 5 points
    No wonder they can't find you, someone's crossed the address out!
  11. 5 points
    Earnt it's keep today. Moved a friend's 25 foot ranger about 3.5ton all up. Made it work up some of the hills and the gearing is definitely a little tall. But she did admirably, the temp guage stayed put in the middle and the oil pressure light didn't even flicker. Mike
  12. 4 points
    Hi, First day of the new year, and i thought it was fitting to start a topic about my new Project. Yes, Shock horror, after 28 years on my Landy, I decided it was time for a change. My new project is a 4x4... but it is not a Land rover... No, I thought there are other cars about that I fancy having a go at (not many, but still). I fancied a classic car. And the one that started of the whole 4x4 scene, a willys MB Jeep. They just look right and there is so much history to them that that is the one car that always had my interest. They are a bit spendy though, in recent years even complete rust buckets won't go for less than 5K, usually incomplete and without V5, to a running one for about 10K, up to well over 20K for a minter. That was not what I had in mind, and added to this is that in reality, a willys jeep is not much of a car: They tend to have their spec stencilled on their hoods in the uk: And that pretty much says it all; Although added to this should be no heater, manual wipers and almost no brakes. The general advice for these is not to enter a motorway which makes sense, but if I am going to get one of these, I want it to be able to get along with normal traffic. Which is 70 MPH in the UK and ideally a bit in reserve as well. So then my mind goes into modifying ideas, but the problem is that this devalues the car, which just does not make sense to me if you spend a lot of money in the first place.. Like most iconic cars, people had a go at imitating it, most notably the Jago Jeep, based on an escort MK2. Many people have done home grown replicas, usually based on suzuki chassis. Neither of these interested me much, as it is just too far away from the real thing. There is, for us in the Uk an alternative though: the Mahindra Jeep. Generally overlooked by most people, due to having a bad name, they were sold in the UK between 1990 and 1995. They were license build Willys jeeps, build in India with the blessing of Jeep. Their spec is based on the Willys CJ3B Jeep, which is the latest and greatest Willys jeep ever build; They have a 4 speed gear box (as opposed to 3 speed of the original Willys), hanging pedals with a brake booster, a Peugeot Diesel engine, A dana 44 rear axle (very strong) and a chassis made out of thicker material. They tend to be overlooked as they were withdrawn from the UK market due to quality problems and a following dispute between the importer and the mahindra over who was going to settle the bill. Problem is of course that if you try to sell a car 50 years after it was originally was designed, you will have to deal with different expectations. I suppose it didn't help that Top Gear did a feature on the worst car ever made, and guess who came out on top... Anyway, Having looked at this option, I decided it is worth looking into. The rolling chassis is basically identical to the MB, so a replica MB body bolts straight on. The only real difference is it being RHD, and there is no such thing as a RHD Willys MB. So a bit of modding will be required here. It is also possible to lower the bonnet and bulkhead and replace the wings, grille and screen to make it look like an MB. Anyway, A mahindra it is, and this is what I bought: From 1990, with a V5 on diesel and a body falling apart from rust holes, it was ideal for what I want with it. And it was very cheap. Engine did run, but the clutch was seized solid. 30K miles on the clock, these things don't travel far, as they aren't very quick. with a bit of work I dismantled it into this: Into this: I didn't expect chassis were riveted together in 1990, but this one certainly is: So that is where I am now. Plan is to fit a newer engine, I bought a VW 1.9 TDI from a Pasat for it. Disc brakes, PAS and overdrive, and topped of with a Willys jeep replica body, this is going to be my modern day classic car. Daan
  13. 4 points
    Some time ago as something of an extravagant eBay impulse purchase I bought a small Proxxon MF70 with CNC conversion as the "missing link" in my tool collection, figuring with a mill & a lathe you can make anything. Life got in the way but I've finally dug it out and set it up - as you can see it's small enough to have on your desk which is part of the attraction for learning: I downloaded LinuxCNC and am currently running it inside a virtual machine (which is a terrible idea and should not be attempted by anyone) on my indoor PC just to get the hang of it, lo and behold I actually got it to do a thing: I'm not about to actually mill stuff in the house as it will throw carp everywhere, but I can at least work out the toolchain before moving to a dedicated PC and moving it all to the shed where mess can be made. I'm hoping to get a bit of tinkering time over the festive period so will post updates.
  14. 4 points
    I have been informed today of a well known local Land Rover thief having had a visit from a few fed up locals , apparently bones were broken ! I won’t give names or locations but I was glad to hear it .
  15. 4 points
    In my experience most people who have a new vehicle take it back to the dealer for servicing, makes warranty claims easier and there is a perceived quality because of the flashy showroom and high price. My experience of a lot of the dealers across all makes I've owned is that they are swollen organisations with poor communication even between people in the same building, their customer service attitude tends to be to deflect the problem and convince the customer that it's because they're dumb and not mechanics rather than actually looking to investigate a fault. They train and employ parts fitters and will only do what the computer tells them and will not actually look for a fault because they only have one tech trained highly enough to do it who, even if he had the time to work on cars, neither they nor the customer would be willing to stand the exorbitant hourly rate they charge. Many are company cars or lease vehicles and the dealers well know that the lease companies are looking for minimum bills and don't care who long the car will last after they've sent it to auction. An example is VW who have a long and short service plan, if it's a private buyer the service interval might be set at 10,000 miles, if it's a company it might be set at 25,000 miles - for the same vehicle?! However the car usually survives the up to 5 years that that owner has it. The second owner takes it where ever is cheapest, doesn't research when things like the cambelt are due as they assume if they ask a back street garage that sees dozens of different makes to service it they will just know what needs doing. They don't realise that if you ask a back street garage to service it they will change the oil and filters, kick the brakes and give it back. These garages can be really good or really poor. I know one that won't take a shield off the bottom of an engine, they drill holes to get at what they need to, wipe spark plugs to make them look new etc etc and another that has fixed things for me that a main dealer couldn't. After a few years start getting a few problems that need money throwing at it so they just chop it in and slag it off to anyone that will listen. I've had a lot of fiats in the past which were always cheap cars compared to the competition, this tends to be the fault with them, people buy them because they're cheap, won't spend money on them because they're cheap and slag them off when they go wrong. I think another good example is air suspension, how many people say the pump burn't out so I put another one on and that burn't out so I converted it to coils. But never look for leaks etc The next owner tends to go one of two ways, they're either a bodger who buys it cheap, runs it into the ground or does home fixes with wood screws and tinfoil or they're an enthusiast who takes the time to understand it and maintain it above and beyond. I think this is where the land rovers have done well in the past as they have a huge following of enthusiasts who enjoy looking after them. Their current range are to help their margins on selling new vehicles which you can't blame them for as that's kind of important to them, but the question will be can the enthusiasts get what they want out of the current vehicle range and keep up with the technology requirements to keep them going? I read the land rover manual for the EFI on my old range rover and I understood what it did and why it did it so I was able to diagnose faults. I had to call VW assist to my Amarok a few weeks ago. It had gone into limp home mode. Basically when the soot in the DPF gets to a certain level it's supposed to go a regen, for which you have to have over 20l of fuel, the engine has to be upto a certain temperature and you have to drive over a certain speed for a certain amount of time. If these conditions haven't been met and the level of soot gets to a second trigger point it comes up with a warning on the dash telling you to go for a drive that does meet those conditions. However there is a fault in the software where that second warning doesn't always come on, then it goes to limp home and VW have to do it manually. VW (and probably the third party that write the code) know about the issue but haven't been able to find the fault and fix it yet. If they can't do it what hope would I have in 10 years time? I think when it comes to Jeep you have to give them a certain amount of credit. They make for their home market which is huge, and if you include south America enormous! OK Fiat / Chrysler are trading off the brand reputation with some of the softer models but what's different with America over the UK is that a lot of those vehicles will go off road regularly. Even if that's just unmade roads it's still a lot of vibration and dust that most Land Rovers will never see in their life. Well, apart from the potholes. That was my lunch break wasted...
  16. 4 points
    No good to me, he's using Alu-min-um, not the Aluminium that we weld over here 😁
  17. 4 points
    Problem Solved! Had a test drive today and the brakes/servo work as they should again. and on top of that the turboboost has come back again aswell. here comes a short summery of the problems what i have checked, what turned out to be faulty and how it was fixed so that if anyone who has the same problem and cant be botherd Reading the whole tread or searchinng for specific info still can take help from this post. Problem: Car didnt have any brakes/brakes failed to slow down the car more then 10 kph untill the braking Power stopt increasing whereby the car kept "Rolling" to a stop. also car was kind of sluggish no boost from turbo. Checked (inkl my result): stuck calipers - not stuck but pistons where rusty tried first to grease up the pistons which didnt work later chanced the calipers but didnt do any differance. bleed brake at multipule occasions to makes sure there was no air in the system When stepping on the brakepedal, pedal was hard and didnt sink when starting the car. When taking hose of the servo unit no hissing/blowing sound that pressure wass released checked suction on the vacuumline no suction at all checked return valve in the servo should only blow air from the servoside - worked fine Compared suction between two vehicles Compared with two different Vacuumhoses Replaced: Changed Vaccumpump (second hand genuine) the car gor a Little more suction but not halv of what a propper had. Still no pressure in servo. Checked and changed vacuumline due to ruling out Connection to aftermarket Cruise Control. changed to a single line from pump to servo. pedal sinks/ pressure back in servo. During testdrive the brakes work and car is not sluggish anymore and turbo seem to have pressure back. Thanks to all helping/comming up with ideas and telling me what to check.
  18. 4 points
    Hi, Just found this in another forum. Could it be what's hiding in mule's clothing? http://www.homemadetools.net/forum/steam-powered-land-rover-photos-videos-70639?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=12-20-18#post123450 Mike
  19. 4 points
    I try to stay away from Britpart but that looks quite good
  20. 4 points
    apologies if this has been seen before, sent to me just now it made me smile.
  21. 4 points
    No it isn't. It's complicated, f**k ugly stuff for rich people
  22. 4 points
    Giving an autobox 9 speeds is like giving a woman 48 pairs of shoes. Too much time thinking about choices, not enough time moving forward
  23. 4 points
    DOHC diesels have been around for years - nothing special about them. Require minimal day to day servicing - cam belts etc are no harder or easier than any other belt OHC engine. Brakes - the same as any modern vehicle. No problem. Suspension arms are basically the same as any modern IFS vehicle - yes airbags are different but are relatively simple to replace though rarely needed. The air system itself is just a series of tubes and valve blocks all easy to service if needed - the main issue is the compressor which are rebuildable or easily replaced. Gearbox, tfr case and diffs are easily maintained but if there is a gearbox or tfr case problem then they are off to the experts. Sorry if you look at these vehicles in the cold light of day and without the bull - underneath they are not a lot different to other vehicles. Yes some things are best left to the technicians but most routine maintenance is possible at home. My car is now 11 years old, is used offroad quite a bit - it still has its original air compressor, all original suspension components, original engine, gearbox, diffs and tfr case, but it does have a new alternator early in the year - took about 1 hour 20 mins to do - outstanding work I will do shortly - complete rear brakes (the fronts done last month and took about 1 1/2 hours) and front lower suspension arms - I will probably get someone to put the suspension arms in as I have arthritic shoulders and probably could not undo the hi torque bolts without hurting myself but you only need to watch Youtube to find out how to do these and many other maintenance work on these cars. Once you start working on these cars the mystic soon disappears.
  24. 4 points
    Checked on my engine hour meter 2 days ago, now got over 307 hours running since the rebuild, all running fine
  25. 4 points
    Obligatory 'grinning like a loon' pic...


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