Jump to content

roamingyak

Settled In
  • Posts

    271
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Reputation

41 Excellent

Profile Information

  • Location
    Portugal

Recent Profile Visitors

1,088 profile views
  1. @Arjan Yip, next episode will probably have a quick snippet of gear used and links I think.... @Eightpot lol yes, I had the same experience, waiting inline at the supermarket, bored, turn around and 'Oh, theres 3 bare breasted ladies covered in red clay standing behind me". Opuwo has a true frontier town feel to it... Buckley the chap in RY3 is a Himba, true story - he named his baby girl after me, that story comes a bit later :)
  2. Thanks mate The huge majority of people in the world are good and decent people - and who doesn't want to help a traveller in an older Landy 😉 I've spent quite a bit of time there over the years, so you get the lay of the land so to speak, its kind of 3 countries in 1 so you need to adjust depending on each situation. Namibia is easy compared to many other places in Africa.... In this trip I was trying to keep away from people as much as possible though!
  3. KISS - Keep It Simple Stupid is a good approach to take. I try to keep things original and then supplement them if needed and possible... Land Rover HD rear springs with 130 helper springs inside for example. He has a good Nigerian police checkpoint video - a few will literally make up any bs to try and get money from you...
  4. Thanks mate, it will become more 'in the bush' based after a few episodes. I thought the decisions taken would be interesting for many people and it gives context to the rest of the films I think. Plus having previously built the studio I wanted to use it a tiny bit at least
  5. My first episode is up if your interested, from here on I'll assume you know how subscribing on youtube works (please feel free to leave on a comment on there btw, it helps youtube figure out what 'good' content to promote is) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aPD6SpcuNrE
  6. Thanks... Though to be honest trying to film with other people that are not involved in the filming on the trip is next to impossible - filming slows everything down and is all consuming a lot of the time. 14 hours days, day after day, but I absolutely loved it, great to have a purpose your engaged with each day.
  7. 😆😄 You should enjoy it then, thanks for the encouragement
  8. Nope, thats the price for the Jimny not a Defender!
  9. Loads of older ones here in Portugal, much loved. Sadly the new one is only being sold as a commercial vehicle here, no rear seats allowed, must have a full dog guard installed, so it's only a 2 seater. And its 30,000 Euros....
  10. As those who have helped me on here with my Landy might remember I spent the last year locked down in Africa - it was never dull thats for sure To give myself a purpose each day rather than just drifting around aimlessly I got some camera gear and started filming some ideas and routes with the aim of making them into youtube series. After a few months at home and a million hours of tutorials on how to use my editing software, I'm getting there - a short intro video uploaded today. Maybe some of you will enjoy following my progress... If your kind enough to check it out please let me know if it looks and sounds ok on your device, thanks https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKMBDvxp2eh732jk1Mz_7Pg
  11. I believe there are issues in Mongolia with illegal miners if you stray into their area etc, but generally people are Buddhist/Socialist and very gentle and extremely hospitable. You can't survive there without helping others and relying on their help sometimes too. I have many lovely memories of staying with families in the middle of nowhere after just riding up on the horses. I may have played New Zealand's first football game against Mongolia in one tiny village. We got thrashed as it was 8 kids against me Russia is ok I think, keep your wits about you as ever. People with power and alcohol as ever are the ones to keep away from.
  12. I spent 3 months there when I was younger. It was the first year that they allowed independent travel, 1998. Bought 3 horses and a cheap tent with a Taiwanese woman I met (brave soul, never left Taiwan before!) and travelled around the entire west of the country. It's a brutally hard place, average elevation is about 1800 metres, vast vast emptiness, we had deep snow in July one night. No fruit, no vegetables, people live off their animals. I was very run down when I left. Huge alcohol problem, I was beaten up badly by a drunk. With a sound vehicle it would be interesting, you can shield yourself from these things, it is very majestic and interesting, but in a very short window each year, 2.5 months maybe. Winter is down to past -40 in places, -20 almost everywhere is not uncommon. I'll go back there one day in my Landy hopefully, horses were fun but also very hard work.
  13. Shame, I took my Landy there when I first started in 2000, they did all the mechanics of my rebuild, 112,000km around Africa without any serious or even medium level faults.... Never found mechanics so good after them....
  14. Looks like a Land Cruiser front bumper. Imagine its to do with impact assessments, you may not get away with replacing a crumple plastic bumper with a solid metal one like a Defender etc?
  15. I thought it would be interesting to detail what I'd like the Grenadier to have/not have as somebody who spends years living in Africa in their vehicle (owned a 1991 110 200TDI for 20 years) compared to what we know about the Ineos Grenadier so far, purely as an feedback exercise for the makers and so others who have done long trips can chime in towards building a 'expedition' spec model, or at least trying to avoid them going too far in a direction that makes the Grenadier unattractive as a serious overlander..... Absolutely must have: - LWB Hard Top model available, 3 doors (and no glass windows in the back is ideal). Many friends with kids want a 130 model. - 17" wheels are not standard where I go, 16" steel wheels option please, change your brake components not the tyre size. - Must comfortably carry TWO spare wheels: * 1 on the bonnet (so max of 235 to avoid blocking too much vision) which is enhanced so it doesn't bend and is safe to work under etc * 1 on the back (weight attached to the CHASSIS not the back door) that swings away when you open the back door and doesn't cost more than a few hundred pounds for a solution. - Rear spare wheel carrier can take a High-Lft jack as well (best place for them). - Ability to mount an extra fuel tank underneath of at least 60 litres. - Ability to mount a water tank(s) of at least 60-100 litres underneath - Room for jerry can holders each side (2 each side is perfect) - Can take a roofrack like a Brownchurch one with supports front and back into the bulkhead and body. Frontrunner type junk doesnt cut it. - Workshop manuals readily available for download - Parts catalogues with numbers and diagrams readily available for download - Ability to turn off or better yet, physically remove any alarm or similar disabling devices - Water sedimentor as standard - Dashboard and interior fittings that are really really easy to remove and put back, and dont rattle! - A large range of colours that look nice, not just bland - Can strengthen the suspension without having to raise it, eg: 130 helper springs as standard parts available - Waterproof snorkel as standard - Duel rear shock mounts - Genuine spares are readily available for a reasonable price and I'm not stuck with buying ****part because nobody imports genuine ones because they are too expensive for the local market which is 99% the case in Africa currently. (Have you looked at the quality of a ****part 200TDi Defender fan belt, flippin heck you couldn't hang a mouse with it). Strongly desired: - No alpine windows, they just leak and I don't need any more daylight in Africa thanks, there is enough, its the enemy! I paint mine white on the inside and then used rooflining to stop the light again. - Big and wide angle wing mirrors that can take be whacked by trees 30 times a day and are easy to replace when they do break the mountings. - UV blocking in all windows More to follow, feel free to add your own lists if you've done long overlanding trips.....
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience. By using our website you agree to our Cookie Policy