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SteveG

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Everything posted by SteveG

  1. You can give Dave at Ashcrofts a ring if the axles don’t last. I expected to see a brace bar underneath for the rear seats too, rather than just the bolts. Glad to hear the business is going well and good news on the family front too. How’s Gordon Murray’s escort coming on? cheers, Steve
  2. Venturing off road again.......

    Here you go, this is all I have...
  3. Tyre inflation - non-standard

    Or in this nice dry weather, get a piece of chalk, (most real mathematicians have this to hand ) draw a line or multiple lines across the tread of the tyre. Drive down an even-ish piece of tarmac and check for wear. If it’s even you’re ok, if not adjust air pressure up or down accordingly.
  4. Venturing off road again.......

    A blast from the past, 15-16 years ago, but here’s some pics of excellent front bumper that Nick made for me... I have more more pics from all angles and of the bumper off the RR if you need them. The rear bumper was easily solved with a jigsaw, rear exhaust boxes replaced with straight through, and never had any issues after this mod, mostly as I only hit trees going forward. Just looked it up on MOT history and it’s still MOT’d and seemingly going strong, even after all that early abuse. cheers, Steve
  5. Venturing off road again.......

    P38’s rust too. The 96 one we stripped for the 4.6 V8 had heavily rusted outriggers, rear crossmember, and EAS tank. The main chassis was fine though. Another thing to remember on D2’s, as well as the rust, the majority don’t have diff lock, so you’ll most likely have to retrofit one. As already said both the 4.0 and 4.6 can suffer from the slipped liners, so both D2 & P38 are the same here. Most of the electrical gremlins on a p38 can be bypassed easily. A p38 on air is a better drive than a D2, but for off-roading, HD steering arms, suspension, bumpers etc. are readily available and cheap. have fun picking one
  6. Compressor regulator fittings??

    Thanks, I appreciate the response, albeit I’ve got to now go and get yet more connectors. I’ve tried to unscrew them, but they won’t budge without applying enough force to damage them. cheers, Steve
  7. I recently ordered a new SIP compressor and 200l tank. I’m now in the process of hooking it up to my existing SIP compressor with 100l tank. Unlike the existing one, the regulator that comes with the new one doesn’t have the usual female 1/4” fittings it has these fittings with taps included... What are they?? A 1/4 BSP will thread on, but it’s loose as there’s no taper, and it doesn’t look like 1/4 BSPP as there’s no collar at the end for a copper washer/o-ring and also there are two flats on the threads. I assume there some sort of hose fitting that has a nut collar on that you slide into the receiver and then spin that until nut is tight, and the nut collar has an o-ring to seal it. Either way it looks no good to me. Looks like I’ll have to remove them and screw in my 1/4 XF quick release females into the body of the regulator cheers Steve
  8. Overall width - anyone had width issues laning?

    No, although I’m sure there’s plenty of Lane from hell’s. This one is in South Wales, with a less than p38 wide gate at the top. Here’s a video of Mark90 driving it...
  9. Overall width - anyone had width issues laning?

    When I used to lane the p38, ~2001, there were only about 3-4 lanes I couldn’t do due to gate width. Typically one of them was ‘Lane from hell’ which was a pain in the derrière. Not an issue anymore as it was a RUPP, and some of the other ones may have been as well, so irrelevant now. Only other issue was doing a couple of lanes on the mountainside where it felt like the ruts were the only thing stopping you from sliding down the mountain. In the p38 you could only drop one side of wheels in. Still here, so obviously not an issue, but it certainly made you wish the Lane ended soon. cheers, Steve
  10. Spark plugs for 4.6 P38 on LPG

    I assume magnecor are still decent?
  11. Removing bitumen headlining glue stuff?

    I found a hot air gun and scrapers best to get the majority off, then white spirit to clean off last few bits and residue before painting. cheers, Steve
  12. Good dust mask ?

    After trying a bunch at various prices, the best one I’ve found is the 3M flexible mask... https://www.amazon.co.uk/3M-7502-Medium-Reusable-Half-Mask/dp/B00FYNN5J6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1523811575&sr=8-1&keywords=3m+7502+mask Once the mask is bought, the dust filters work out about £8 a pair... https://www.amazon.co.uk/Pairs-3M-6000-Particulate-Filters/dp/B00SOKSH0I/ref=pd_sbs_328_1?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=WKKEKP73MCYXCMMYW7C6 The fit is really good, and you can easily drop the mask down around your neck when not needed. You can also fit A1 or A2 filters if painting, working with chemicals. I ended up getting two in the medium size and having one set up as dust and one as paint/chemicals. cheers, Steve
  13. The diesels all used separate pumps so you should be a able to easily source a range rover classic diesel pick up that will fit your tank.
  14. Range Rover Classic Swivels

    I have a pair of RRC ABS and non ABS swivels here if you want to check if they’re better than yours. Hills Road before Addenbrookes. cheers, Steve
  15. Forum relay or 1 way trip?

    Hi Jon Can’t help with relay, but when I had the non runner range rover classic donor picked up from Manchester to Cambridge, shipping via shiply quote was £267, to give you an idea of worst case costs. cheers Steve
  16. Most cars don’t fuse the starter motor feed. What are people’s thoughts on this? Good practice to fuse it of not? A number of vehicles have a core feed wire from + terminal on the bat to starter, and then a core feed + wire to main fuse block. Some have main fuse block fed from bat directly. Again any pros & cons against this, or is it just a way to keep cable costs down? VSR load rating. The max current draw of the range rover classic VSR is 40A, yet you can have it feeding front heated screen (2x 25A), rear screen 30A, and optionally split charge when fitted. Assuming that LR didn’t just ignore the max operating limit, is there something I’m missing here? Similarly, the existing ignition relay doesn’t seem to be heavily rated. I’m planning to use a Bussmann RFRM as my main relay and fuse block. It has two 100A busses. If I used an Albright SPST isolator instead, I’m assuming I’ll be ok for this to be kept fully open all the time ignition is on, as it’s rated - Thermal Current Rating 100% 250A https://www.firstfour.co.uk/albright-su280-isolator-250a.html cheers, Steve
  17. I’ve seen a number of custom bike and car places using wago connectors for junctions in wiring up. Any views on using them for automotive use? https://eshop.wago.com/JPBC/0_5StartPage.jsp?zone=6 Both the 222 and 221 have automotive use listed as an application by Wago, rated to 32A and accept 0.2 to 4mm squared wire, so fine for most wiring applications like lighting, cdl etc. The only issue I can see is they have a max operating temp of 85 deg C. Personally, I don’t plan to use them outside the interior, and most thin wall cable is only rated to ~100 deg C anyway. They seem to be a neat way to junction things like tail lights, indicators, cdl etc. where you can have up to 6 outputs off a single feed. Thoughts?
  18. I’ll look on the donor 91 3.9 and what the factory starter cable is. cheers, Steve
  19. Thanks John, this is the reason for posting this stuff on here. For example if you go by the voltage drop theory online and use calculators, like those on 12v planet that recommend no more than 3-4%, you end up needing 16mm2 cable for the rear heated window. LR uses what looks like the equivalent of 6mm2. So from your experience of burning them out, for the starter feed what’s recommended 25mm2? cheers, Steve
  20. Range Rover Classic Headlight Upgrade

    They are obviously getting some juice from another circuit. With halogens you wouldn’t see this, but with LED’s they typically switch on at 9v, and draw so little current. When you installed them, did you just plug in or look at removing dim/dip modules, isolating wiring etc.? To get them working ok, you’d need to look at isolating the circuit and directly wiring them in to the main beam and hi beam switches. If you want the option to be able to retrofit in halogens in the future you’d have to do this via relays for a good install. Hopefully this helps. cheers, Steve
  21. I’m learning too . I’ll see what the 221 series look like when they arrive, but so far they look like a good solution to the multiple junctions I’ll need, especially on the lighting circuits.
  22. Thanks for the replies. I’m planning to use 50mm2 from battery to starter, starter to bulkhead pass through and then this to SafetyHub 150 inside the vehicle. A bit overkill, but I already have a couple of metres of both red and black from previous winch installs. The consideration of fitting a fuse was more from a safety point of view, rather than protecting devices. Albeit unlikely, I’d personally rather have a fuse stop a short in the starter wire/starter and theoretically prevent the risk of fire than not. To go with the 50mm2 I ordered a 300A fuse. Reading through is this now too high?
  23. Thanks for the info. They’re designed for stranded and single core. i just tried the 222 series out with 1mm2, 2mm2, and 3mm2 and all fit ok and are very secure... As you can see from the last pic, it clamps them evenly and securely. You could go belt and braces and fit ferrules. I have some of these that I ordered to use in the motogadget terminal blocks... The max that will fit with ferrules, is 1.5mm2, as you can see the 2mm2 only just fits. Personally, from seeing how well it clamps all the wires tested, I wouldn’t worry about fitting ferrules. I’ve ordered some 221 series blocks off Amazon today, to see how they are. They also have a fully flat back compared the 222 that have about 40% of the back angled, as you can see in pic 2. I plan to mount the connectors on the back of the fuse block etc. mounting bracket, so I suspect the 221 series will be better for this. cheers Steve
  24. Thanks Al and Wes, useful info. cheers Steve
  25. Where’s your Snow pictures?

    Bit of an extreme way to keep warm...
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