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reggie

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reggie last won the day on March 15 2016

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About reggie

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    Warwickshire

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  1. I do have the ecu, how much work is involved to fit the gearbox I wonder? Would it be a complete loom change?
  2. Hi guys as the title suggests can a P38 Auto gearbox from a 4.0 V8 fit on 3.9 V8 in a classic? I’m thinking yes as its the same box but no oil filler, what other differences are there? Or reasons it wont work out? I have one sat around & thinking I might aswell use it rather than source one for the classic.
  3. I have sourced a pair of front soft dash seats
  4. I’ve broke a good few range rovers over the years and from my limited knowledge I’m pretty sure that it’s only the 4.6 P38 that uses the 4HP-24 gearbox. The diesel P38 and 4.0 use the 4HP-22 as does the D2 4.0 V8 and 3.9 RRC and D1. Not sure on the RRC 3.5 V8 though as never had or broke one. I think that there are 3 different size torque converters for the P38. The 4.6 has the biggest one, the 4.0 has a smaller one and the diesel the smallest. Not sure if they have different bell housings though. The RRC a D1 V8 use the same bell housing and torque converter I believe, just transfer box is different with the RRC using the Borg Warner viscous unit. Where I start to get unsure is the electronic control you talk about on the D2 George, is this only on the D2 I wonder? Is this not compatable with a RRC then with XYZ switch removed? Or could a 4.0 P38 4HP-22 with the right torque converter and XYZ switch removed be used in a RRC or is the D2 one different to the P38? This is the one I have lying around and I think it’s out of a D2, is that plug in the body what controls it electronically? Pretty sure from memory that the P38 doesn’t have that plug. If so then I’m guessing a D2 one can’t be used in anything other than a D2.
  5. Hey George only just seen this, awesome work and I’m really happy that you got your dream to take shape. You talked the talk and now you’re walking the walk! I must admit I was a little excited for you when I watched it, after our chats knowing how much you must have put unto this. I have a lot of respect and admiration for people that follow their dreams, you didn’t give up and that shows in your work. Once again top job George 👍 I’ve not long come back on the forum myself so your video has come at the right time for me as I’ve just started thinking about doing a restoration myself. I acquired a soft dash just over a year ago (yes I parted ways with both 2 doors) which has sat on my parents drive doing nothing but annoying my mum. I also have another RRC in my garage also doing noting except for annoying me and maybe even my misses a little. So I’ve just started searching for parts that are missing on the soft dash so I can do a little work when the days get better as no indoor space to work on it. Your TV series will help and has already helped to inspire me, I might need a few more bags of milk teeth sending over though, to see me though some of the more challenging days 😉
  6. I need a refresher course on Land Rover gearboxes I should know all this stuff but I’m slightly unsure. Is the 4HP-22 gearbox the same on all models like RRC, P38, Disco 1, D2 apart from Bell housings and torque converters? Say for instance I need a gearbox for my RRC (which I do) would a P38 gearbox fit in? I have a 4HP-22 in the garage but not sure if it’s off a D2 or P38. Would I just need to fit the Borg Warner viscous transfer box and good to go? What torque converter for example as it has one but not a RRC one?
  7. Thanks for that little bit of info guys. Mine must have been an air suspension model as it’s got the height sensors still attached to the chassis. It does look like it had a coin tray though rather than air suspension controls. Also what year did they start using air suspension on the soft dash?
  8. I’m trying find out what parts they share between the 3 models, I have a soft dash to restore and have parts missing. Do all 3 models share the Center console as it looks to be the same? Also did the soft dash have a coin tray on the right hand side of the radio like the disco 2? Mines missing whatever it’s supposed to be. Would be good to know a list of parts they share so I’m not just limited to trying to find soft dash parts.
  9. Does anybody have any suggestions as to which seats I could fit as looking around, I’m not going to find any soft dash seats in a hurry. What about electric P38 seats, would they fit?
  10. It won’t feel like a Range Rover with a diesel in though, if you want it waft along effortless like a Range Rover should you want a V8 and on LPG for better economy. Sorry to confuse you further 🤔
  11. I don’t think it’s going to be very easy to find two soft dash front seats.
  12. Ah yes I think I remember seeing those a while back now you mention it. Looks like I’m back to hunting for two front leather seats for soft dash.
  13. As per title I’m wondering if there is any difference except for the stitching lines? I know the soft dash the stitch lines are vertical rather than horizontal but is that the only difference? Could a hard dash front leather seat from say a 92 hard dash model be retrimmed to soft dash stitching? I have the front two grey leather seats missing out of my soft dash restoration project.
  14. I think I’d rather take my chances with a D3 over a P38 for reliability any day but having never owned a D3 I don’t know what they are like to work on DIY. The P38 is a nice vehicle and very cheap now to, but be prepared to spend lots of time and a bit of cash replacing lots of components and a lot of research in the quest to try and make it a more reliable vehicle. I’m sure there are lots that have done so but it’s a bit of a learning curve. They don’t really rot though so if you don’t like welding and are good with a spanner than the P38 may suit you. A Range Rover classic 200/300tdi pre air suspension would probably be best for DIY work with a spanner but be prepared for lots of welding/rust prevention ongoing more than actual spanner work. You will end up with a vehicle that will go up in value rather than down if you keep it original and rust free and still a nice vehicle to drive and own. The L322 is the nicest drive of all and reliability is not too bad and quite easy to work on DIY. They are also cheap to buy but beware on buying a cheap dog that somebody is trying to move on because they don’t want to spend any money on it. They are lots around the 100k mark that are showing there age related problems and need money spending on it. Most owners will still go to the dealer or Indy and get a huge whopping bill which is scary, hence the reason they sell them but if you do the work yourself, no so bad at all. The td6 also has a weak gearbox so not the best choice for towing but a good reliable engine if prepared to replace the box. The 4.4 petrol has a good engine provided it’s been maintained and gearbox is the same, they need problem areas adressed before they become a headache car. This is where they may start to get a bad reputation, because some owners don’t want to spend the money on maintenance or get their hands dirty. I’ve owned and ran a few RR classics and a L322, had plenty of P38s but only to break as they all had issues. I currently own a L322 4.4 V8 as a daily driver on Lpg, been trouble free for over a year except for a starter motor and a faulty recon transfer box motor that got replaced under warranty. I also have a soft dash classic for restoration. Hope this helps a little in your decision.
  15. Ok thanks guys I had a feeling it was a 300tdi unit that was compatible so I’ll look for one of those 👍
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