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Pawl12

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About Pawl12

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    Member

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  • Location
    West Midlands, UK

Previous Fields

  • Interests
    Competing in Road Taxed Vehicle (RTV) off-road trials

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452 profile views
  1. Didn't use any special tools when I changed the FPR on our 10P engine TD5 a couple of years ago. It's a pig for access & I think I remember using an elastic band to hold 1 of the bolts in the FPR loosely while manoeuvring the FPR into position. It was easier than trying to find the bolt hole in the FPR mtg flange under the inlet manifold. Again, plenty of great advice on the infamous www.discovery2.co.uk website created by Urban Panzer.
  2. Have a word with TD5inside, I think they're doing Variable Vane Turbos & even have options for multiple stages of tune from the same ECU with more than 200 bhp available.
  3. Have a look on www.discovery2.co.uk I'm sure Urban Panzer did a good write up of a re-build on there - with photos.
  4. Is it possible you've still got some air left in the system after bleeding? That would give the same symptom.
  5. Yes, Diff-lock & TC work well on the D2. It's not clear on my profile pic, but there's more about 2 foot of air under the Left front wheel - only possible because of them both allowing progress despite the massive hole / cross axle I was driving through. Shame, but unfortunately inevitable, about the tin worm taking hold on your chassis.
  6. Jon, has yours got standard ARBs ? Mine has still got ACE and what seems like more articulation than shown in your photo
  7. Ref the 235/85x16 tyres : I use that size for off-roading in our D2 (Insa Turbo Special Track) on our approx 2in lifted D2. The tyre runs very close to the washer bottle , but shouldn't touch. I've got cut down inner wheel arch liners still in place & as long as they're tied forwards against the washer bottle pipes, it should be fine. I've used standard offset wheels & spacers / modulars. They're all fine. Biggest issue is the top outer edge of the tyre contacting the top outer edge of the wheel arch or top of the inner wing at full articulation. Overcome with stiffer springs / better dampers or slower driving - lol PS if you want to get a better idea of clearances, find yourself a very deep gulley to drive into at 45 degrees until you've got lots of articulation at both ends
  8. The term has now been hi-jacked by various parts resellers to help their sales. With many resellers it now only means the manufacture has supplied something to the vehicle manufacturer as original equipment on some vehicle - not necessarily the part you want to buy or the vehicle you want it for. It definitely used to mean the manufacturer was the original equipment manufacturer of the specific part on the specific vehicle. Genuine is the nearest equivalent nowadays I think.
  9. The ZF Lifeguard 6 gearbox oil is the only approved oil for the gearbox in your 3.6TDV8. There are others that are allegedly to the same specification, but you've got to decide whether you're willing to take the risk. They might perform OK initially, but will they protect the gearbox as well as the ZF oil that has allowed the gearbox to last more than 10 years without any problems so far ? If alternative oil is not as good, the eventual cost will be many times the cost saving initially. I decided to use the genuine ZF fluid when I changed ours a few months ago. I bought 7 litres & used 6.5 litres. Meyle do a good replacement plastic gearbox pan (including an integrated filter ). ZF obviously also sell a replacement. For the Range Rover Sport you can't change the gearbox sump without lowering the cross member which is in the way - There is a steel replacement sump with separate filter you can use which makes replacement easier. Britpart & perhaps others make the steel sumps. I used a UK supplier called Advanced Factors, for the fluid & sump, but other suppliers may have better prices at different times.The gearbox is common to many other vehicle manufacturers (BMW etc), so you don't need to use a Land Rover parts supplier, just Google ZF 6HP26 sump & fluid. My gearbox changed gear much smoother after the fluid change & the old fluid did not look very burnt / discoloured (2006 TDV8, 125,000 miles)
  10. If you've not found info yet, have a look on .http://me1000.co.uk, I uploaded loads of the various D2 related accessory fitting instructions some time ago.
  11. I run 235/85 x 16 Insa Turbo Special Tracks (Extreme Muds) on my D2 for RTV trials competitions. With a 1.5 to 2 inch suspension lift, they fit OK, but need either a modified (cut down) standard front bumper or steel front bumper to prevent heavy fouling at full lock. The small plastic inner wheel arch liner section at the front of the front wheels needed pulling & fastening forward to also prevent rubbing. With the modulars or standard rims + 30mm spacers, you can get a bit more steering lock by reducing the length of the steering stop bolts (they're not adjustable on a D2). You can let the tyres rub on the radius arms a little at full lock - even if in theory, it could fail an MOT (I've never had any problem). At full suspension travel while cross axled, the tyre will rub the top of the wheel arch liner, but not cause problems. I've run standard D2 alloys (16x8", 57mm offset & 16x7", 57mm offset), standard D2 Commercial steel wheels (16x7", 57mm offset) & Paddocks modular steels (16x8", 27mm offset (+30mm)).. They all can be used, but the 57mm offset wheels massively reduce steering lock at the front with the 235/85s unless 30mm spacers are used too. At the rear, the 57mm offset wheels have the advantage of creating no rubbing in the wheel arch without any mods - even at full articulation. They also have a very small positive impact on turning circle due to the narrower track than the modulars. The modulars cause some rubbing & tyre damage in the rear arch at full bump & articulation - although it might be possible to reduce this by rolling the wheel arch lips. The 235/85s are narrower between the sealing beads than an 8 inch wide wheel, so the tyre fitter has to know what he's doing to get both beads onto the rim ! After lots of experimenting, I run modular steels on the front & D2 Commercial steels on the rear.
  12. The plate that holds the bias springs at the base of the gear lever could have come loose / not been tightly fully originally. That could certainly make it difficult to "find" the gears.
  13. You mentioned the new booster is much deeper than the original 1. How much deeper is it ? Is the diameter the same or is smaller, but has stepped diameters ? It's probable that the new booster has a different specification to your old one - the amount of assistance or amplification of your pedal effort. This could make it feel very different. Did the booster have any manufacturers name on it other than Bearmach's name (Bearmach don't make boosters) ?
  14. My body weight on the end of a 3 foot long 3/4 inch extendable socket wrench worked for me (I'd worked out the torque was almost spot on)
  15. As said in the first response, the regulator is usually the cause. There are a couple of while plastic wheels that can break up & then allow the glass to rotate in the guides & jam. I managed to fabricate a temporary replacement for 1 using odds & sods lying about when ours failed during a Bank Holiday weekend when everybody was shut. The other that can happen is that the bolts can come loose that maintain the position of the bottom of the vertical guides for the glass - allowing the glass to slop about. The door card needs to come off to fix either issue.
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