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Snagger

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Snagger last won the day on August 10

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About Snagger

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  1. Wide, soft or knobbly tyres won’t help, but worse, wheels with offsets or spacers will adversely affect feel, stability and weight of the steering. Any uneven road surface will “grab” at the wheel riding over the surface flaw, and if you have increased the scrub radius (distance between the swivel pin axis and centre of the tyre contact patch), then it’ll pull the steering of line. How strong that effect is depends on the scrub radius, tyre type, tyre pressure, road speed and the nature of the road imperfection, but to someone who wants car-like handling, it’ll all be noticeable. The more standard and road biased you can make the tyres and wheels, the less problem you’ll have.
  2. I had terrible results with the window mounted dipole antenna, which surprised me, but the clear plastic/ thin loop window antenna from Halfords worked fine. I did have to fit it in one of the rear windows of my 109 as the front screens are heated, and that screws up antennas royally, but this cheap one has been dandy. As John said, I can’t see an antenna sitting under the roof rack working well.
  3. It’s in a 109, so as long as those bolts can be removed (many doing Series retrofits omit them entirely), then the ladder frame comes out simply enough after dropping the oil pump. Done it myself a couple of times, after learning the hard way and drilling the SIII bell housing to clear the cap head bolts that I had counter sunk in the flywheel housing...
  4. Not as simple as an earlier 2.5 or the 300 because of the ladder frame, which needs the oil pump out of the way first, but not that bad. The biggest snag is if the four longitudinal bolts into the rear of the ladder have been countersunk in a Series retrofit without drilling the bell housing to allow bolt extraction without separating the bell housing from the flywheel housing...
  5. It was good for what it was intended, surprisingly so in fact, except for the K series engine issues and the early vehicles propensity for viscous unit and IRD failures. But it wasn’t up to Defender working tasks. The Defender name is meant to suggest this new vehicle will be as capable or more so than the old Defender of working with large loads or heavy towing in tough conditions and be as adaptable and as dependable (semantically different from reliable). Time will tell, but I don’t think any of us really see this as a works or emergency services vehicle. As an alternative to the D5 and other high ticket LR models it’ll fare well (though competing with your own products and complicating your own sales and logistics seems folly), but I still don’t see it as fit to wear the Defender name.
  6. They can wear out, but I have been told that is uncommon. It’s the crank bearings, including big ends, that take most of the wear. The big end shells are easy enough to replace in situ, and I think the crank main shells would be doable without removing the crank shaft with a bit of effort sliding the upper shells around to drop them out the bottom and then sliding the new in, but you’d need to be careful not to put too much downward pressure on the crank that could damage the seals at either end ( I suspect the gear box pinion shaft will keep the crank well aligned enough to prevent rear seal damage, but be careful all the same), and you may need to slacken the two belts up front to prevent the crank being pulled upwards as the upper shells come out.
  7. Big ends are conrod bearings. 😉
  8. There’s one on every other driveway around my neck of the woods. Their wives’ arses do look big in what they’re wearing, but they should be more concerned that their dicks look small in what they’re driving...
  9. There will be minimal difference. You could try a four bolt box, which should be a straight swap as I understand it. Don’t underestimate the importance of accurate tracking adjustment. You should have 1.2-2.4mm toe out. Anything else and the vehicle will wander badly, especially on rutted motorways, and will feel incredibly vague. Obviously, suspension bush and steering rod end condition is critical.
  10. I have Polybush in my springs, but genuine metelastic bushes in the chassis - I don’t like the lack of outer steel sleeve of PU bushes and the lack of protection that affords the chassis or spring should the PU fail. I also prefer the dust and grit exclusion that the interference fit of the metelastic bushes give. I had to fit PU bushes to the springs due to a problem with a single spring eye (loose fit of metelastic bush) on advice from Heystee, and I can live with the perceived risk to the springs, but not the chassis.
  11. I disagree, Daan. Some people doing stuff on the cheap are using second hand industrial motors and lead acid batteries, but that is becoming rare. More are using purpose made equipment, and the three seemingly most popular routes are Tesla motors, Nissan Leaf (usually the entire system, pared back) or the Netgain Hyper9 AC motor with off the shelf controllers and BMS, typically with new prismatic (like Leaf) batteries that don’t use thermal management. They’re surprisingly capable and reliable, with a conversion done at home usually coming in at about £15k. Not cheap, and still range limited, but there are a lot of new avenues opening up in battery chemistries and construction that should dramatically improve range, charge times, longevity and cost in the next few years. Of course, improvements will continue to come, so whenever you chose to bite the bullet, you will always be just too son for the next big thing, but you can’t defer forever. I think within the next three years, it’ll be more viable to do one of these EV conversions than to carry out a petrol or diesel conversion, or even to do a full engine rebuild for a car to be kept for over five years. Don Incol has done a very good Lightweight conversion near Adelaide. London Electric Cars have done a SIIA 88 and a 90 amongst others, and plan to sell a kit for Series and Defender conversions, as do Jaunt in Australia. They don’t have Bollinger capabilities, but they have better performance than Tdis or V8s, are easier to drive, cause less shock to the transmission and use the brakes less. They’re range limited at the moment, but with all these new battery designs on the horizon, that won’t be an issue for long. And I think you can forget hydrogen, with all the inherent problems that’ll bring.
  12. While the wheel is off, you can also pry the plastic cap of the hub flanges and look for spline play. I’ll wager there is play and rust - LR self-sabotaged 300Tdi and later models by adding a seal inside the stub axles that prevents oil lubrication of these splines, causing accelerated wear that gets even faster once the rust get in. Usually, new drive flanges are enough, but you will need to check the shaft splines too. The diff ends are almost always fine as they’re lubricated. I doubt you’d have diff issues, but it’s worth checking the pinion for play - that is the weak point of that diff type. Driving without the rear prop will not determine between suspension or transmission faults as with the rear transmission disconnected, the axle case will not have the torque reaction that stresses the suspension. You just need to try to move the suspension joints with a pry bar and look for play.
  13. As Cack says, a leaky hub is often axle case pressurisation, so give the axle, especially near the hub (to spot new leaks) a wash and check the breather is clear first. If it is the seal, check the land that the seal runs on too, as if this is grooved, you need a new stub axle. At least the noise is a simple and fairly cheap and easy fix!
  14. It sounds like prop UJs to me. I have had UJs make a tinkling noise, a little like stirring a cup of tea, even though they had no play and seemed ok on the vehicle - dropping the propshafts revealed mild to moderate binding in one axis, and once the UK was removed, it was all to easy to see the wear and broken rollers. Don’t ever be told that you can check the serviceability of a prop shaft or it’s UJs while fitted - you have to take them off and move each UJ throughout its range in each axis, feeling for binding, roughness and play.
  15. I use copper grease. It has always worked so far, but there may be better alternatives. I thought the copper would continue to act as a lubricant and rust inhibitor after the grease died out, hence not using moly. Graphite grease should do the same.
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