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SolihullBeast

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About SolihullBeast

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  • Location
    South England

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  • Interests
    Juggling Land Rovers and Tertiary Education, why couldn't I have chosen a cheap hobby!

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  1. Thanks all, very useful. Will go with 7 inch modulars
  2. Many thanks - I have just been offered some 16 x 8 by a friend, would they be too large? Sam
  3. I have bought a set of 235 85 16 tyres and now looking to get wheels to fit them, however I can't seem to find a definitive answer on what wheel width I'll need? I am getting standard 16 inch steel modular. Advice would be much appreciated. Apologies if this has already been answered and I have missed it. Thanks Sam
  4. Thanks for the responses, and my apologies for the radio silence. As usual LR4x4 has proved a great source of knowledge. I will try and get in contact with the clubs that have been mentioned in the thread, thanks to those of you who suggested them I have sent you all PM's. Given the present ground conditions I think that the site will not be ready for vehicles until the weather improves and things start to dry up, however this will give me an opportunity to clear some of the tracks and make preparations for perhaps trying a few events this summer. Like any new venture I clearly have some homework to do and will keep you all posted as to how things progress, I will try and get some photos uploaded of the site. For those of you that were inquiring the site is in West Sussex near Ardingly. Sam
  5. Thank you all for the responses, very useful indeed. It would seem that there are many factors to think about. Insurance seems to be the primary hurdle, and clearly presents perhaps one of the biggest costs of running a site. I will obviously have to make further enquiries here to get an idea of the conditions that would be imposed upon the site/myself for any cover to be valid, and how these would affect the running of a club, certainly if the insurers stipulate onerous requirements like helmets, whilst good from a safety point of view, I can imagine this would be very difficult to enforce and indeed may limit those who would be willing to come to the site. I will do some digging. Has anyone had experience of trying to insure an off-road event or site? It would be useful to have an idea of the sort of premiums I can expect! Marshals are also potentially an issue. How many are required on a site? Would they require any qualifications? It seems that if the figures do not stack up as a pay and play site, then the next step is perhaps to approach a club. Thanks for the input so far
  6. This is perhaps a more unusual thread/less common question that arises on the forum, but anyway... I am fortunate enough to live on a farm in Sussex, like most farms we are diversifying in order to make ends meet. Growing up I had Land Rovers as most farmers do at some point, and when I had more time I enjoyed playing in the mud and repairing the inevitable injuries that a working Land Rover sustains. Lately there seems to be more repairing and less playing in the mud! Anyhow as part of our efforts to diversify I am considering that there may be the opportunity to provide off-road driving on the farm thus combining the need for income with a hobby of mine. I have been a member of this forum for some time, albeit not hugely active, nonetheless I have found it a great source of knowledge and experience. So I wonder if anyone on the forum has done a similar thing? Or indeed if anyone has any advice. The farm benefits from perfect topography for off road driving; steep valleys, natural springs which ensure mud even in the driest of summers, wooded copses and seclusion from neighbours. The landscape provides both challenging and more manageable off road driving. The soil is almost exclusively clay with sandstone outcrops. I am in no doubt it would make a great course. I am aware that there are many different ways to approach this, but I can anticipate that it will be some form of "Pay and Play" Site I have been lucky in that I have been able to do my off road driving on the farm, however because of that I have never experienced a pay and play day. But I understand from friends that they generally fall into two categories; 1. The more formal sites which specify MOT & insurance requirements for vehicles, do not allow quads, have specific requirements relating to noise, provide marshalls and have a code of conduct. 2. The less formal sites where essentially the drivers are allowed the use of the site without supervision. I can see that each of the above options has its relative merits, the first options being a much safer environment and arguably better managed, but the latter perhaps offering more freedom for the drivers and participants. Is there a view amongst members of this forum of what a well run Pay and Play site constitutes? Whether there are certain essential requirements? What would the ideal Pay and Play site be? If I am to set up something of this nature I would very much like it to be a unique example and one that sits well within the Land Rover community, so want to fully understand what people views are on these places and any good/bad experiences. It is difficult to work out, but from what I can see there are not a great many pay and play sites around, certainly there do not appear to be that many in South East, having said that I suspect that many are marketed by word of mouth only. However if I have misread this then do let me know! Is there another better way of providing off road driving that perhaps I haven't considered? Finally what is considered the 'going rate' for entering vehicle into a pay and play site? Your thoughts would be much appreciated, I am thick skinned so be honest! Cheers S
  7. Melted release bearing.. Earlier this year my local 4x4 specialist replaced the entire clutch system on my 2000 TD5 Disco including OEM parts; - Master & Slave Cylinders - Hydraulic Pipe - Flywheel - Spigot Bush - Release Bearing - Clutch Cover - Plate Since that service the vehicle covered 800 miles and the clutch has gone again, so back it went to the specialist who discovered this... Clearly the release bearing has been pushed against the clutch causing it to melt and seize. What confuses me is how after 800 miles this kind of damage could have occurred? I am the only driver of this vehicle and have never ridden the clutch or rested my foot on the pedal. The bearing was OEM (no blue box!), or so I am told. Could it be that when the specialist last replaced the entire clutch system they did not adjust the pedal/slave properly and the release bearing was constantly pushed against the clutch? Are there other reasons why this can happen? Unfortunately the specialist (who will remain un-named for now) are trying to charge me a hefty bill for this and simply insist that I was riding the clutch regardless of what I tell them. Is there any possibility that they failed to install the clutch properly last time? If anyone has seen anything like this before I would be interested to know. Any input would be appreciated
  8. Thanks Les, It is now sat in the oven, and seems to be fine.... so far so good!
  9. Bit of an unusual question however need to ask it! I have several parts which I have painted in VHT paint and the aerosol can suggests that in order for the finish to be durable and resistant to the elements it need to be cured, by being baked for an hour at 90 minute, fair enough.. now to the problem; As a student I am still living at home and fortunately my mother has been reasonably tolerant with my hobby the the toll it takes on the house.. bedroom being a parts store, bath being a parts cleaner and the like...! however does has anyone had any experience in baking VHT painted items in a domestic oven, will it fill the house with fumes? Stain the oven in any way? make all subsequent meals taste of CFCs? If not then I'll risk it, but I thought I would ask first in case I am about to cause myself problems! (and potentially eviction) I know that often just the heat the vehicle develops itself in the course of functioning cures the paint but it did not work well the last time. Anyone with any experience on this matter your input would be greatly appreciated Sam
  10. The company replied and explained, very helpful, and my mind is put at rest, now onto fitting it!
  11. Thanks for the response, from what I can see it has the correct stamps so no further questions, looks the like genuine article, cheers
  12. I ordered a propshaft from LRseries recently and was comforted by the fact that their website stated that the propshafts supplied as replacement were hardy spicer. So went ahead with the order and the item turned up with a blue sticker on it.. oh dear. So after several attempted calls I eventually emailed with my concerns and received a reply which stated that although the item arrived with a britpart sticker, it was in fact made by hardy spicer with GKN uj's and this could be confirmed by the marking on the UJ's and a sticker on the shaft itself that says "inspected and found ok". I'm really looking for a second opinion here, are there any elements that distinguish a prop made by britpart and a prop made by hardy-spicer? If the gentlemen from LRseries is correct in what he says then that would in effect make this britpart item OEM, two words which I haven't seen together before, but am perfectly happy to accept if the item is in fact made by Hardy spicer, but sourced by britpart. Has anyone had a similar experience? Or knows any details regarding the britpart sourcing? This thread isn't intended to drag up the old blue sticker slagging match, I am aware that has been done to death with the same outcome each time! just looking for a little clarification. Many Thanks
  13. Sam Didn't Know that!! Like I said though still experimenting, so information like that is very helpful thank you!! Will be cautious Sam
  14. Not a fan of these either, but they do a bloody good job when there not eating flesh though. Tend to avoid them when doing irregularly shaped stuff. I am now experimenting with electrolytic rust removal with interest. Sam
  15. Ah I see, that makes sense. Thanks Again Sam
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