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New Series - RR Heavy

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MAP will happily get 1" copper pipe cherry red, I don't now what the figures are, but there is huge energy increase over butane.

Well worth forking out for.

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Think I might have a MAPP torch, it takes yellow bottles which seems to be the MAPP colour. Just can't check just now because it's about an hour away. Think I'll save up for one of those mini oxy propane kits though, they seem the biz.

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George, just watched your last episode.

 

that compressor you've got should be able to handle cavity wax just fine, you just neglected one important step...

 

stick the can of wax in hot water for a few mins before use! trust me, it makes all the difference.

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Agreed, the compressor at 100psi will be the same as any other compressor at 100psi.

Warm the wax, and check your hoses for small orifices, on a similar cheap compressor I found one new hose only had ~2mm passage in the hose just behind one of the fittings.

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Think the compressor only makes about 70 PSI, says 3-5 bar and the can of wax says 4-5 bar so it's right on the edge. So even though this stuff is fluid like water at room temp it needs heating? It didn't say anything on the can, but then maybe I didn't read it well enough. Someone also said a larger bore hose to the gun would make a difference too?

 

Here's the episode btw! :)

 

 

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both your points are valid.

 

if your feeling like a bit of a maverick you can wind the pump cut off pressure up a bit. just don't go mad.

 

and yes, it needs heating. makes all the difference.

 

as for the flow rate issue, yes, it could be improved by using a decent hose.

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Hmm, well most, even the cheapest compressors, go up to 8bar/100psi. If it isn't, you aren't plugged into the regulated output are you? They normally have two, one regged, one not.

If not, then as above, turn the wick up a little, the power difference between 70 and 100psi is quite marked.


Check your existing hose out first before buying a new one, I managed to open mine up with a drill bit, I eventually replaced it, but made a huge difference with high consumption tools

 

Even prior to fixing the hose I was able to squirt warm and thinned waxoyl, which is much thicker than what you have, with a standard degreasing gun with embaressing amounts of power inside a lightweight chassis, proper atomisation, and full internal coating.

With your current setup, perhaps just patience is the answer. :)

 

 

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Yeah. The slightly annoying thing was that this whole cavity wax experiment was one of the things I didn't twig until later watching the footage back. It was painfully obvious that I prob cold have at least given some of the sill internal a very thin coating. But I couldn't see how much was coming out from the gun end of the lance, it being 5+ feet away from the action. 

More annoying is I couldn't find the destructions for the compressor and I was rushing too much to get my head around the two outputs. I'll check tomorrow but sod's law says I'm plugged into the reg'd one. Flip.

Well I can always open up a small hole and lance the sills later if I can tweak the hose/output/wax temp to good effect. Will make interesting viewing for those who were contemplating a little cheapo compressor. Thanks for the supervision :rolleyes:

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i think you'll fine the range rover sills as standard have lance holes with bungs in. so not the end of the world if you have to drill a couple of bung sized holes :D if its good enough for land rover.....

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Yep, they do :)

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Haha well do you blame me not noticing? Hard to tell the factory holes from the slightly newer ones on the original sills. Anyway do you mean the holes down the length of the inner sill? I welded all but the biggest of those up :i-m_so_happy:

Was thinking if I make two small ones, just big enough for the lance to pass through and well aligned between the underfloor support and the sill end, they'll go some way to helping keep the lance centred down the bore. Then a couple of grommets. Originally hoped the lance would pass through the square tread plate holes but just too small.

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On 2/16/2019 at 9:04 PM, Bowie69 said:

Agreed, the compressor at 100psi will be the same as any other compressor at 100psi.

Warm the wax, and check your hoses for small orifices, on a similar cheap compressor I found one new hose only had ~2mm passage in the hose just behind one of the fittings.

^ What Bowie said, check your system for restrictions. It could be down to the skinny nylon air-line not flowing enough air, seen that before in the workshop - big industrial compressor, big windy gun, but not able to undo a nut because the air-line was a cheapo one - 5+ metres of restrictive line knocks the air delivery down significantly, like voltage drop in skinny wires you end up with 100PSI in the air tank and 50psi in the gun when you pull the trigger.

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Bit of a makey uppy solution to fitting an earlier style alu boot floor to a later, modern door seal style car in this one. Of the two floor support bars only one lines up, plus the factory holes for the seatbelt anchors are in the wrong place now too, but I've got my alu welding rods and will try to fill the old rivet holes and make new ones.

 

 

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I see Sir has discovered welding distortion :lol:

Mind you, I can't take the tiddle as your rattle-can paintwork is 100x better than anything I've ever painted :ph34r:

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Sir was very happy with himself focussing on the repairs, until sir broadened his gaze and realised the rest of the panel was throwing a party with the heat in the meantime :rolleyes: 

Feel great having made a stab at paint with rattle cans, like I learned more with this than anything else. It really drove home the methods the Delta Autobody boys showed me. They offered me a spare gun to shoot the primer with, saying whatever about the colour, the primer should be done that way. It was painfully obvious they were right. I didn't take it because I wanted to see what I could do with cans btw.

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You're not wrong about the Jedi paint master teachings, 90% of paint is the prep and care taken, you've got a better job with rattle cans than some people manage with full spray gear and two-pack so it's obviously paid off.

I don't know what the situation is with the welder fund but I suspect a proper gassed MIG that can manage decent low-current work, or even a TIG if you're feeling adventurous, would put less heat in than the flux-cored stuff. It also helps to move around, a bit like tightening wheel nuts or head bolts, to avoid creating a wave of heat in one place. That said, I still struggle on thin stuff through impatience, much like paintwork :lol:

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The stop motion slows the process down so I'm usually trying to work fast to compensate. To get that [smooth] stop motion effect when welding I'm essentially stitch welding, all be it joined up, so stopping after every spot to trigger the camera. It took me a long time to realise how much it can effect a weld. I am able to weld a lot better than it looks when there's no camera involved.

The new welder will be an AC/DC TIG before it's a new MIG. That's if I can't attract a deal from a supplier for one of each ;) It's been an ambition to learn to TIG, and as a LR owner it'd come in very handy.

Impatience is like vice sometimes 😂

 

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TIG is probably the least useful type of welder for an old Land Rover (IMHO), much as being able to weld ali looks attractive. How clean you have to get everything, how awkward it often can be to get both hands to the work and having to stop and clean the tungsten every time you take it for a swim doesn't lend itself to working upside down with your arse hanging out of the car, welding bits of tin into grotty old panels at all well... Its great on the bench for precision stuff where you're comfortable, the work is scrupulously clean and the lighting excellent; not so much for resto work on a drive with a gale blowing. It's a recipe for extreme frustration and poor results, so I'd urge you to rethink. R-tech do an excellent gas MIG for about £400 that's perfect for automotive resto stuff. Should leave a fair chunk in the kitty for the TIG later with a bit of saving and give you a boost in the meantime.

Keep it coming though, enjoying the series hugely :)

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Thanks mate, I wouldn't be welding on the car if I could help it and regardless I've always wanted to TIG, it's not solely about the car. Anyway you've prob seen I don't mind doing things the right way, I mean dealing with the monotony of the TIG prep. 

I was excited about R-tech, they sell the whole 'family run' thing hard and it's the kind of ethos I love, plus their TIG and entry MIG would fall within budget if they gave a relatively small discount. I called them a few times looking for, and leaving messages for their marketing person, but they never responded to those or email. Call me old fashioned but the lack of courtesy put me off.

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Miller seem to be quite keen on getting into YouTube, might be worth a try? Their multimatic machine is most likely well over budget, but can do all three types of electric welding in one machine.

I would echo the comments above, it is not just the cleaning for tig, mig is faster, more reliable (more resistant to contaminants etc) and definitely more user friendly than tig. Expect to need tuition for tig, whereas mig you can pick up mostly by watching videos and lots of practice.

The only reason I would use tig on a car is to create stainless or aluminium brackets and the like. I guess you could look at Binky, and make note of what they use - even for the smallest stuff they are using mig.

 

 

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Don't get me wrong, can't wait to have a MIG that doesn't smoke, and hopefully has a little more scope than four power presets. There are a number of companies doing AC/DC TIG machines sub £1k and decent entry MIG's at £3/400, and what I'm getting at is I'm hoping to have both. In fact some [non related] marketing people have advised me I should be requesting a plasma cutter too. The prob is the channel numbers are small at first glance, every motivated creator on the planet is hitting up marketing people day in day out, and a lot of companies are only waking up to the whole thing.

Funnily enough what I was after initially was one of the triple process machines and only Miller, ESAB and Everlast are in that arena. ESAB's was supposed to launch in Jan but I can't figure out if it actually did, so I'm not sure the price. An Irish agent contacted their sales directly on my behalf, that didn't get a response. The Everlast machine retails at around $2k which I thought was very good and it gets decent press. They have a rep for being progressive with online marketing but I couldn't raise their marketing guys either, or the owner of the company who used to openly post on a welding forum. I'm sure they're [all] inundated though.

Anyway the upshot is there's some progress with a good company in the background. I just haven't talked about it because I don't want to crack the beer until I know the whiskey chaser is in the house.

 

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Cool, good luck George :)

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Your stop motion welding amazingly shows the glow and it feels almost like real time slowed down if that makes sense. I wonder how you are triggering the camera so quickly? Do you have a foot pedal or maybe even a voice operated switch?

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