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I 'slipped' when I was moving a piece of steel with the grinder running. I know what happened, I had run out of neoprene gloves and had a latex one on my left hand, and they just don't have the grip neoprene has, my hand slipped off, and the index finger contacted the spinning grinder. 

Result was a 4 hour trip to A&E, the wounded knuckle was scrubbed out under local anaesthesia which clearly didn't work, using something which approximated itself to brown scotchbrite. Two days later I had to visit A&E again as it wa getting very swollen, diagnosed as infected, antibiotics prescribed, another 2 hours lost, slightly less pain this time. Took about 3 weeks to fully heal, and prevented me from doing anything further on the car during that time. That is just my cost, add in the hospital, nurses and other health pros and it is quite an expensive 'slip'. 

All for just not switching the grinder off as I adjusted the steel. 

Simply not worth it, and this was just a minor injury, could have been a lot worse. 

I am more careful now, and either have neoprene or no gloves on when grinding, thick gloves just stop me from being able to grip it properly so am more likely to drop it! 

 

 

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1 minute ago, Bowie69 said:

I 'slipped' when I was moving a piece of steel with the grinder running. I know what happened, I had run out of neoprene gloves and had a latex one on my left hand, and they just don't have the grip neoprene has, my hand slipped off, and the index finger contacted the spinning grinder. 

Result was a 4 hour trip to A&E, the wounded knuckle was scrubbed out under local anaesthesia which clearly didn't work, using something which approximated itself to brown scotchbrite. Two days later I had to visit A&E again as it wa getting very swollen, diagnosed as infected, antibiotics prescribed, another 2 hours lost, slightly less pain this time. Took about 3 weeks to fully heal, and prevented me from doing anything further on the car during that time. That is just my cost, add in the hospital, nurses and other health pros and it is quite an expensive 'slip'. 

All for just not switching the grinder off as I adjusted the steel. 

Simply not worth it, and this was just a minor injury, could have been a lot worse. 

I am more careful now, and either have neoprene or no gloves on when grinding, thick gloves just stop me from being able to grip it properly so am more likely to drop it! 

 

 

That's one for where the grippy coated thin cloth ones like Ansell Hyflex come into their own. Even when covered in carp they're grippy.

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Just now, landroversforever said:

That's one for where the grippy coated thin cloth ones like Ansell Hyflex come into their own. Even when covered in carp they're grippy.

Never have a problem with neoprene, always grippy, even when oily. 

 

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People that know me will know I'm a bit ... erm.... blasé when it comes to safety, but an angle grinder with a cutting disc and no guard makes my butt pucker, I'd find another way.

 

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11 hours ago, Anderzander said:

I’ve been scared of them ever since if I’m honest ! 

Thats a good thing Stephen! 

Mo

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I'll risk starting a holy war here and say that I do always remove the guards from my grinders as it gives better visibility and doesn't get in the way or catch on things, and all the professional fabricators I've worked with seem to do the same.

However, I do ALWAYS wear gloves when grinding, and as was explained to me you always make sure your body and face are not on the axis of the grinding wheel so that if it explodes it's not heading for you - also then sparks aren't showering you either. It's a difficult habit to get into as the instinctive thing to do is to lean over to see what's going on. Much like having your head in the axis of the large lump of metal spinning in the lathe - it's very hard to keep yourself off to one side when you're concentrating and it really takes a lot of effort to learn not to do it.

For videos like George's, removing guards for a better shot is very much expected so I wouldn't give him a hard time about it.

It's also hard for some folks to throw a "good" cutting disc in the bin if it's got a little bit of damage but that's how they explode - I've been taught to snap the thing in half so that no-one picks it up and uses it - it's called Widlarizing.

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3 hours ago, FridgeFreezer said:

I'll risk starting a holy war here and say that I do always remove the guards from my grinders as it gives better visibility and doesn't get in the way or catch on things, and all the professional fabricators I've worked with seem to do the same.

However, I do ALWAYS wear gloves when grinding, and as was explained to me you always make sure your body and face are not on the axis of the grinding wheel so that if it explodes it's not heading for you - also then sparks aren't showering you either. It's a difficult habit to get into as the instinctive thing to do is to lean over to see what's going on. Much like having your head in the axis of the large lump of metal spinning in the lathe - it's very hard to keep yourself off to one side when you're concentrating and it really takes a lot of effort to learn not to do it.

For videos like George's, removing guards for a better shot is very much expected so I wouldn't give him a hard time about it.

It's also hard for some folks to throw a "good" cutting disc in the bin if it's got a little bit of damage but that's how they explode - I've been taught to snap the thing in half so that no-one picks it up and uses it - it's called Widlarizing.

:(

I’ve never found the guard in the way of visibility (maybe filming for George aside). Having the guard also means for you to watch it you have to be off to one side of it. 

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9 hours ago, FridgeFreezer said:

I'll risk starting a holy war here and say that I do always remove the guards from my grinders as it gives better visibility and doesn't get in the way or catch on things, and all the professional fabricators I've worked with seem to do the same.

However, I do ALWAYS wear gloves when grinding, and as was explained to me you always make sure your body and face are not on the axis of the grinding wheel so that if it explodes it's not heading for you - also then sparks aren't showering you either. It's a difficult habit to get into as the instinctive thing to do is to lean over to see what's going on. Much like having your head in the axis of the large lump of metal spinning in the lathe - it's very hard to keep yourself off to one side when you're concentrating and it really takes a lot of effort to learn not to do it.

For videos like George's, removing guards for a better shot is very much expected so I wouldn't give him a hard time about it.

It's also hard for some folks to throw a "good" cutting disc in the bin if it's got a little bit of damage but that's how they explode - I've been taught to snap the thing in half so that no-one picks it up and uses it - it's called Widlarizing.

I'm also guilty of not always having the guard on, only on 5" grinders i hasten to add, I also find it easier to be accurate and disc can get further into awkward corners, unlike Fridge I rarely wear gloves, however I always wear suitable eye protection. I've used grinders extensively for 40yrs and not had a A&E visit although to be fair I have had a couple of melting cut moments.

On a more somber note I have in the last week took a healthy chunk out of the top of my thumb with a wood bench saw, again no gloves but i would argue that if I had had gloves on the damage could have been worse as the strength of the leather may have pulled my hand in, no A&E much to my wife's disgust, have not had my jab yet and the local hospital has not covered itself in glory with regards to Mr Covid regards Stephen

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Yep, wood tools can be just as nasty - our builder had a mishap with his spindle moulder last year. It kicked - probably caught a knot or something - and pulled his hand in. Cost him a couple of fingers and a month of work.

Angle grinders are probably my least favourite tool - they're incredibly useful, but...nasty dangerous things. A few years back a neighbour was helping me break an old RRC. He stopped cutting and swung the grinder down by his leg without waiting for it to stop. I yelled and he reacted enough it only took a nick out of his boiler suit - right over his femoral artery. Not really grinder specific, any hand-held spinning tool has that risk - but most are bettered guarded and held in ways that don't make it so easy to do stupid things with them.

Didn't someone post a photo on here of a bit of grinding disk embedded in their googles?

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I suppose the other side of the coin is that when you see people doing it online, less experienced people think it is 'OK' to do, and then go and have an almighty accident losing a finger or worse.

I suppose it is a bit of social responsibility that is required when you put yourself in the limelight -something I know I have mentioned before.

Do what you want in your home, but if you are in any way showing how something can be done, be sure you are not teaching people bad or dangerous habits.

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On 4/12/2021 at 4:06 AM, geoffbeaumont said:

 

Didn't someone post a photo on here of a bit of grinding disk embedded in their googles?

I seem to recall that too.

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Whatever you do, make sure you have a strong stomach before you google for it -there are quite a few out there including incidents resulting in death.

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30 minutes ago, Bowie69 said:

Whatever you, make sure you have a strong stomach before you google for it -there are quite a few out there including incidents resulting in death.

Totally agree. Worst I've seen was a guy pulled into a large lathe  chuck, it literally shredded him, not for the faint hearted I look at my lathe with healthy respect now regards Stephen

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