trickydicky

propshaft swap

22 posts in this topic

hi all on my old defender I always had my propshafts fitted upside down so the water would drain out with no problems but on this one I fitted them with he sliders to the transfer box .after spending the day in water and not driving it for a few weeks the centre slider on both props became solid .I normaly grease them every 6 months .what are your thoughts on fitting the new ones with the sliders to the axle so they empty ? has anybody had any problems with props fitted this way around ?

Edited by trickydicky

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Both of mine are fitted with sliders to axles and I have never had a problem with them.

 

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iv just watched a few youtube vids and they seem to be that way around aswell .I'm now thinking my imforrmasion may have been wrong .I was told that they should be fitted with the slider to the top because if they broke it would stop you getting beaten to death by the tube (which sounds logical)

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How often do they break and how many LR drivers have been beaten to death? :lol:

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I did actualy have one brake on me wile I was going about 70 mph it scared the pants off me . and thinking about it I didn't get beaten to death .

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It's correct that the propshaft is placed so that the water can drain, it's just that the front short yoke is male and the rear short yoke is female, so the front prop joint goes to the diff end and the rear prop joint goes to the transfer box end (at least on a 110).

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I've seen a mate's prop fall in half (it was lifted, and not on a LR), while driving, was entertaining but no one died :)

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iv just seen a reply on another post by western showing the workshop manual that shows both sliders to the transfer box .File0605.jpg

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LR put the slip joints at the inner ends as the transfer box is higher than the diffs, so the joints would be kept out of the muck better.  That's all.

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I've put them on all sorts of ways round and never hand an issue. The key is greasing. However I have read at some point that land rover say both to the front but I've also seen both to the transfer box. So I guess it depends on the model and the way the prop is made.

Mike

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I think, from a practical point of view, you're best orientating them whichever way gives best access to the grease nipples...

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Colleague's propshaft let go on his 90, all it did was smash a hole in the side of the autobox.

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I agree with SNagger that the most important is greasing, but you can't grease effectively without the grease having a little hole to escape (usually inside the fork for the Universal joint), if your propshaft is stiffening up it is most likely they this little hole is blocked and you will be damaging more than just your propshaft when it stiffens up, if puts tremendous load on your transfer box flanges.

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the sliding joint internal splines on the shaft section are coated in a rilsan plastic type coating as well as being greased, mine are as per the workshop manual.

 

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I've just had both mine off to try to get the grease to flow. It's still been quite a job to get it into each bearing. I'd almost given up with one uj and took it off to swap for the spare but it disassembled easily so without the caps I pushed fresh grease though and than put it back together to finish off.

I think the lesson for me is grease more often and thereby don't let it congeal.

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western said the splines are coated in a rilsan plastic type coating but with the tube at the axle end the little drain hole at the  end of the tube got blocked with grease and it held water the rust got behind the coating and swole up and wedged it solid in the tube .the coating was still in tact when I got it out and it was clear how it had happened so iv decided for good or bad to fit them with the slider to the bottom and ill let you know if they fail and I get beaten to death by the tube :lol::lol::wacko:

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1 hour ago, trickydicky said:

western said the splines are coated in a rilsan plastic type coating but with the tube at the axle end the little drain hole at the  end of the tube got blocked with grease and it held water the rust got behind the coating and swole up and wedged it solid in the tube .the coating was still in tact when I got it out and it was clear how it had happened so iv decided for good or bad to fit them with the slider to the bottom and ill let you know if they fail and I get beaten to death by the tube :lol::lol::wacko:

Ickzackly Trickydicky, what you call the drain hole I call the grease escape hole :lol:  if it is full enough with grease then no space for water to get in :)

BUT it must be free so that either extra grease or water can get out.

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On 4/21/2017 at 7:48 AM, trickydicky said:

hi all on my old defender I always had my propshafts fitted upside down so the water would drain out with no problems but on this one I fitted them with he sliders to the transfer box .after spending the day in water and not driving it for a few weeks the centre slider on both props became solid .I normaly grease them every 6 months .what are your thoughts on fitting the new ones with the sliders to the axle so they empty ? has anybody had any problems with props fitted this way around ?

On mine they fitted with the sliders at transfer box.

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There were some nasty accidents with early buses and propshafts breaking, so there used to be a requirement  on PSVs to catch it if it broke to avoid pole vaulting or beating to death, usually a loop or piece of braid or cable.

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It's a drag racing thing too to have containment of the propshaft if it breaks. 

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Yup, and look at any monster truck, that have a huge ladder frame going down from the t-case to axle. 

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