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JMZ153

300 Tdi “T” seal replacement

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Good evening everyone..

 

last month i replaced the rear crank seal rank seal as I had oil leaking out from the bellhousing wading plug. All has been good  until now.. the past couple of days I have noticed oil leaking out again!! This time, much more.. I have spoken to a local agent and he said that it probably is the ‘T’ seals now. He also said that the engine will need to be removed from the 90, drained from oil, flipped over, sump removed and worked on like that..

 

my question is, can the seals be replaced with the engine in place from underneath the vehicle?? 

 

I don’t have any experience with these seals but usually do all the jobs on my 90. Maybe if some one has some photos to point out where these seals actually are, I can understand the type of job it is... thanks :)

 

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As Above.

I've only ever done this with the engine out and fixed to a stand and filpped upside down as part of a full rebuild. I don't think it would be realistic to do with the engine in situ as it would be a gearbox off job.

My recommendation would be to go to Land Rover and get genuine seals if you are going to attempt it because ones that come in a blue box are very brittle making the job even more difficult. Get 4 or 6 incase you damage a seal on the first attempt.

Here is a link to a thread on here about the subject:

 

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It's not uncommon for the rear crank oil seal to be fitted such that the new one leaks worse than the old one. Get the garage to check that this hasn't happened before removing the engine.

The T-seals may be possible whilst on the vehicle but not ideal, as one end of the crankshaft would be cantilevered. The way to do it properly is to remove the engine and flip it over.

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I don't see a reason why the engine has to come out for the T-seals. There is nothing to stop you doing it in situ:

post-2-008237000%201287253572.jpg

 

What i have heard people doing in the past is to remove the cork seal and fill up the void with RTV, until it pours out of the bottom. Reasoning is that the cork saturates and eventually leaks. Problem with the RTV solution is that the RTV can end up in the sump, but I suppose the siff would keep it out of the engine, or the filter if its small. It could also well be the crank seal fitted incorrectly, as it is meant to run in on a dry surface of the crank. If this is not done correctly, it will leak.

 

Daan

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Hi everyone, I have bought a few of those ‘T’ Seals and a new rear crank seal for worst case scenario.. 

 

i have also notcied that my clutch fluid level is going down quite fast.. could this actually mean that the slave cylinder is leaking hydraulic fluid into the bell housing and draining out of the wading hole looking like engine oil due to the dust from the clutch??

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Quote

 could this actually mean that the slave cylinder is leaking hydraulic fluid into the bell housing and draining out of the wading hole looking like engine oil due to the dust from the clutch??

Yes, any clutch fluid will just wash out any dirt & drip out the wading plug hole

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So to confirm, all you have had to do is drop the sump and take the cap off the back main?

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What about the crankshaft seal housing gasket - it seals against the journal that you have removed to fit the T seals and is the use once metal type?

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Looks like the T seals didn’t make a difference.. what do you all think, engine out again and yet another new rear crank seal??

D4626A1E-34A8-4FDF-967C-47EAF0460505.jpeg

5707527B-07DB-442C-B355-BAE735B4E409.jpeg

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4 hours ago, JMZ153 said:

what do you all think, engine out again and yet another new rear crank seal??

I think so, its what I'd do

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Yes engine out & replace T seals & crank rear seal.

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Were both previous seals genuine LR? I have never managed to get a none LR rear crank seal to be 100% leak free.

I think it would have been very tricky to replace those T seals with the engine in without damaging them.

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Yes both seals were original - At least the price reflected this... To be honest i found replacing the T seals quite easy.. I have also noticed that on flat ground there is almost no leak.. but when im on a down hill, the leak is very heavy, almost a constant drip..???????

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Get the rear crank seal from Turners, its a better design.

https://www.turnerengineering.co.uk/luf100430-rear-oil-seal-c2x20634757

If they recommend and use that type, it has to be good.

Pattern ones seem to warp along the lower edge and not have the seal in the right place. Even the professionals are having problems with pattern parts. There was an article in LRM magazine about the questionable quality a few months back.

I fitted a pattern seal and it leaked straight away. Not happy, should have known better and its delaying my rebuild from completion. :angry2:

Fortunately I hadn't re-fitted the seatbox so it less of a pain to get the gearbox out again. I'll be testing the seal for leaks before I put the gearbox back on. 

Edited by simonb

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Thanks Simon.. Ill plan to get the engine out :angry::angry:

How can i test the seal for leaks before putting the engine back in??

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On mine, I'm going to take the gearbox out, personally I prefer this method as the coolant, oil cooler lines, fuel and air systems don't all have to be disconnected as with the engine out option. There are probably less electrics to undo as well. That way I can run the engine (with suitable extra support under the sump), with the gearbox off and check for leaks.

For those not in the middle of a rebuild, it does mean the tunnel and floor needs to come out but that's "big chunks" compared with all the engine faff. The seat box can be left in and the crane used through one of the front doors. The gear sticks need to come off, but I still find this easier than lifting the lump of the engine out and removing all the rad and intercooler.

Needless to say whichever way you choose, change the clutch arm at the same time for a reinforced one.

 

 

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