Jump to content
Keeper96

Mig reccomendations h

Recommended Posts

Hi guys, 

im wandering if anyone can reccomend a mig welder for general work, chassis repairs, bulkheads etc. 

Ideall not Clarke/sealey as I’ve heard they have a lot of problems with the torches? 

Thanks 

jamie 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ww can afford to pay for good gear but we’ll be looking second hand etc. 

Ideally cheaper the better because we aren’t pro welders, just decent amateurs and don’t have a huge amount of work for it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a migmate 170p and have been very happy with it. I've had it over 10 years and I bought it second hand. Wire feed mechanism is plastic but so long as you don't over tighten it it works fine. We have an ESAB smart weld at work with is better quality in construction but too heavy for automotive work and doesn't get a better weld than the migmate in my hands.

I would recommend getting one with a euro torch, ie one you can replace with a big plug, so that if you run over it you can just buy one. I'd also recommend using a shielding gas, either a contract with BOC / energas if you use a lot or hobby weld etc if you just use a bit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have a wander back through the tools & fabrication forum, the "which welder" subject has been covered in great detail.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve got a tec arc 360amp single phase, I’m well happy with it have used it on 2 chassis now no problem, also done quite a few other projects with it no problem . We use butters sets at work 3 phase which are good sets .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a clarke 151en, was about £250 iirc. It's in the amateur machine camp and you can tell but it does everything I need and having read a lot of reviews before buying I never came across any trouble with the torches - just uses a standard euro torch and the parts are all easy to get hold of if you bugger it. I will get a better liner for it when that fails for sure. It will weld 0.8 up to 4mm without any trouble but the wsf is a bit sensitive, apart from that it's been fine.

Realistically if you're looking away from the clarke/sealy type machines you're getting into the pro stuff. If you want an equivelant in terms of power but a nicer machine you're probably looking at about double that kind of cost but you'll get a much nicer machine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Portamig.... love it... such a solid machine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

... don't discount a second hand professional machine, it is where I would start if looking for a replacement for my Clarke 151TE.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the left - (if memory serves) a decent modern MTA welder. On the right - my 40-year-old NBC / Butters.

nbc_vs_mta.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Big vote for Oxford machines. Mines a migmaker 330-1 absolute stonker! 

IMG_20170126_231438_617.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 21/02/2018 at 8:48 PM, discomikey said:

Big vote for Oxford machines. Mines a migmaker 330-1 absolute stonker! 

You can go off some people :P:lol: Beautiful job :wub:

Another vote here for Oxford, love mine. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe the oxfords and the portamigs are made in the same factory and are pretty much identical - great build quality and makes mig welding a practical pleasure. - for pretty much all things welding I use http://www.mig-welding.co.uk some great advice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I picked up a virtually new second hand Clarke 130EN for £100 including a load of consumables and safety gear (Parweld auto darkening helmet and gloves) and it's been absolutely find for everything I've thrown at it. Switched away from fluxed wire and moved to having gas and it makes a world of difference.

Slightly random suggestion but have you considered TIG? If you're in the £1k ball-park then I just got myself an R-Tech AC/DC 210 (they do smaller / cheaper) and only had 30 minutes to play with it so far but it was beautiful to use and considering it's the first time I'd even touched a TIG let alone set it up and have a play with it I'm not displeased with the results. Would be more versatile long-term.

Don't get me wrong though - I wouldn't be throwing away the MIG anytime soon, there's a lot to be said for point and shoot particularly in inaccessible places and upside down on your back. But depending on your budget you could possibly get a half decent MIG and TIG together.

DSC_0026.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

depending on thicknesses of metal your welding then id recommend the mig i use

 

sealey supermig180

 

great for everything except the really thin stuff, it doesnt really have enough low down current control.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Ed Poore said:

I picked up a virtually new second hand Clarke 130EN for £100 including a load of consumables and safety gear (Parweld auto darkening helmet and gloves) and it's been absolutely find for everything I've thrown at it. Switched away from fluxed wire and moved to having gas and it makes a world of difference.

Slightly random suggestion but have you considered TIG? If you're in the £1k ball-park then I just got myself an R-Tech AC/DC 210 (they do smaller / cheaper) and only had 30 minutes to play with it so far but it was beautiful to use and considering it's the first time I'd even touched a TIG let alone set it up and have a play with it I'm not displeased with the results. Would be more versatile long-term.

Don't get me wrong though - I wouldn't be throwing away the MIG anytime soon, there's a lot to be said for point and shoot particularly in inaccessible places and upside down on your back. But depending on your budget you could possibly get a half decent MIG and TIG together.

DSC_0026.JPG

The issue for most LR stuff with TIG is that it has to be properly properly clean. MIG can put up with a lot in the way of contaminants that would totally screw a TIG weld.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi.

After a bit of inquiring I went for a Sealey 150 mig has done everything I have asked of it and more for sure. Iv'e had it about 6/7 years had to put a pcb in £60 ish, and it's easy to trouble shoot. If it's just personal use it's fine.

But I would advise if you can, go for a 200 amp if funds allow. I am on the look out for a 200 mig or stick, it will give a better scope of metal thickness you will be able to weld.

Any way good luck.

Mark. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 23/02/2018 at 12:07 PM, qwakers said:

depending on thicknesses of metal your welding then id recommend the mig i use

 

sealey supermig180

 

great for everything except the really thin stuff, it doesnt really have enough low down current control.

I started off with a supermig 180, converted it to eurotorch, great machine, until I treated myself to a Lorch!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

9 hours ago, oneandtwo said:

I started off with a supermig 180, converted it to eurotorch, great machine, until I treated myself to a Lorch!

mine was supplied with a eurotorch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Despite it being at the budget end of the market, I've had a Clarke 120E Mk2 for the past 30 odd years. The thing has been worked hard and continues to deliver the goods with whatever I've thrown at it - LR chassis, car repairs & even the odd bit of fabrication up to 8mm plate. Always been run with bottled gas and proved easy to get a good quality weld. Only real drawback has been the thermal cut out kicking in for sustained heavy duty welding (but I bought it primarily for LR work and that hasn't been a problem).

Torch has required complete replacement once in all the time I've owned it, tips & shrouds come under consumables. Parts have been easy to obtain and not expensive. Might consider a Euro torch next time it comes up for replacement. The earth clamp was upgraded early in its life.

Also has been easy to convert for occasional aluminium welding - wire, liner, tip & small bottled gas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had a Cebora autostar 180 for 30 years now paid for its self time and time again Snap on used to badge ceboras dont know if they still do

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience. By using our website you agree to our Cookie Policy