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New [old] Camelback Drill

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Very excited, I just bought a drill I've hankered after for years. It's a 'The Denbigh' No.1 camelback like the one pictured below. I think it's probably the 24" version. I've a bit of sorting out to do in that it doesn't currently have a motor, so I'll need to spec, mount and wire one, and it'll need a new belt for the power feed. Not sure what to make that from but I understand I need to put a twist in it. Not sure why?

I was hoping for some advice, from reading up a motor with a shaft speed of 1400-1500rpm seems best, but what HP? I saw some using a 2hp motor and someone advised 1hp would be plenty. Are there any guidelines for mounting the motor?

I'd also like to fit a lever style on/off switch rather than a pair of push buttons. 

All advice greatly appreciated!

Oh and why are they called camelback drills?

George

 

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You might find the 1 horse a bit gutless if you're intending to punch through stuff with the large drills it's possible to fit in that MT3 spindle, but for smaller bits in a Jacobs chuck it should be fine. Rotation of single phase motors can be reversed if needed, you just have to fiddle with the start capacitor connection. 

Is it flat belt? If so, save yourself some pain and convert it to A section V belt with a couple of Ali pulleys. Not sure about the twist, though... Do they mean figure 8, or like a mobius strip? 

The lever might seem like a nice idea, but there's something to be said for the button type which drop out when power is removed. Much harder to accidentally start by catching a sleeve on, and you can mount a foot operated stop switch too. 

Looks like a lovely tool, though. Old school iron is so much nicer than flimsy modern stuff! I'll look forward to a few pics :)

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How F. heavy?!!! I hope you've got access to a forklift, or a rugby team!

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Crikey, that's a beast!

What do you plan to drill holes in and what size? A max RPM of 428 is a little limiting... :unsure:

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Yes it's a heavy bird, I'm a little worried about that in terms of it being in transit and especially on arrival but options are limited when you live on an island and need to have big things brought to you. 

I've been looking for one of these for about ten years, not that they're particularly rare, the model was introduced pre war and despite being outdated was still being produced in the '70's! The factories act issued in 1955 in the UK meant that the drive belts had to be enclosed and whereas mine does have a cage, I don't think it's original so the drill could well be pre '55.

It'll get light use for personal projects, mainly car restoration so I'm not fussed about the limits of it's capability. If I'm honest I just love old tools built big with old world beauty. I got switched onto this model at my blacksmith's, a man in his '60's and the Denbigh was there when his father was the smith. He uses his on a daily basis. Good enough for me.

I went rummaging in a big box that came with a Drummond round bed lathe I got in part payment for a job and I found some MT bits, think they're MT2 so I'll need a little adapter, and a Jacobs Skil 0-8mm chuck. It's threaded in the back but I'm sure there's an adapter and it'll keep costs down while I recoup and find a few quid to buy a decent motor. 

Would 2hp be better, or still not enough? It already has a v-belt pulley for the motor, but yes it's flat belt drive and that's part of the charm for me.

Here's a video of a working No.1, you can see the twist in the power feed belt, although in this case it's got a double twist and usually they seem to just have a single. I can only guess it's either to correct the drive or to stop the belt wandering, but the wheels are crowned so prob the former? 

 

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Well it arrived and it's in great nick. I had to strip much off it including the top shaft, pulleys and back gear to get it to clear of the shed door so was able to have a good look. Very happy. It had some nice additions over the years too; a very neat job of a safety cage for both pulleys and motor, and even a guard for the power feed. Don't have pics of that yet but there's a pic below. Even with the parts stripped off it was an absolute mammoth to move.

On 08/03/2018 at 1:53 PM, mickeyw said:

Crikey, that's a beast!

What do you plan to drill holes in and what size? A max RPM of 428 is a little limiting... :unsure:

Have been doing my homework and the speeds should be fine for anything over 10mm, below that I always have my crappy little Draper bench mounted drill :) 

Both are in the last bit of my latest video.

 

54266616026__9DA3220B-00E5-4FF4-B27B-844D21FE00F8 copy.jpg

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I think you're worrying too much about HP, my lathe is ~1Hp and can do plenty of damage. A 1/2HP pillar drill is still pretty capable as you're gearing down when drilling gert big holes anyway. Mine is (I think) 550W, so maybe 2/3HP, and I've never found it struggle with anything - at low speeds with bigger bits it's far more likely to try to throw you or the work piece around than stall!

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Came to the same conclusion as you :) Then saw that the brochure page above actually state power recommended... 1 to 1.5hp.

Have you seen how much people want for machine vices! I think I'll get it running and worry about that kind of thing another time.

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How about a 3 phase motor and inverter? Its probaby an imperial motor, like the myford lathes etc. Youd have variable speed, max torque at very low speed, and braking.

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I've never taken the time to see what the benefit of 3 phase is? I was leaning towards to an off the shelf motor from Clarke. They do motors in .5hp increments and for what seem like decent prices. Their 4 pole motors all make 1500rpm. It's faster than the Denbigh was specified for and by my calculations it might be difficult to get a pulley small enough to match the original shaft speeds, but the drill could probably do with being a little faster for the type of stuff I'll do. Just don't want to over rev it on the bearings.

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Aside from all efficiency gains, for you, with three phase and a variable frequency drive, you get infinitely variable motor speed.

I'm sure you can see the advantages to that :)

 

 

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Ok that definitely sounds cool. Will check it out, thanks man.

Definitely want to be able to go to 11 :D

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I think the 'Denbigh' come with one attached! 

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Damn missed that. I don't have the kitty for it this month anyway and it would have cost a fortune to get in. Thank Mickey. Yeah there was a big steel engineers vice on the drill when it came, but it's not very practical for general purposes. btw, why do machine vices have such a big moving jaw? Is it just for a work surface?

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Thought that was a bit too slow at first Ed but now that I do the calculations I realise it would allow me to use a slightly larger [small] pulley. That was the main problem with the 1500rpm motor, the pulley would have to be less than 3" and that seemed difficult to find with the right combination of keyway/bore. Thanks :)

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