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davidoff

MoT from 20 May 18

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New rules from 20 May indicate that visible exhaust smoke means a fail.  Anybody got up to date info on this topic which would appear to be designed to take the majority of older diesel vehicles off the road?

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I have done a little research after posting this topic. It seems that vehicles fitted with DPFs will fail the MoT if they emit visible smoke.  I infer therefore that older vehicles without DPFs will presumably get through as normal.  Can anyone tell me when DPFs were fitted to our Defenders or 90s?  My 1987 90 engine has been changed for one from a Disco 200tdi but I suspect that makes no difference.

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This is what it says from here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/mot-special-notice-07-17-replacement-documents-and-smoke-test-limits/mot-special-notice-07-17-replacement-documents-smoke-test-limits-and-annual-assessments

2.2 What you need to know

The amended limits to be applied from 20 May 2018 are:

1. First used before July 2008 None turbo 2.5m-1 or plate value if lower
  Turbo 3.0m-1 or plate value if lower
2. First used on or after 1 July 2008 All diesels 1.5m-1 or plate value if lower
3. First used on or after 1 January 2014 All diesels 0.7m-1 or plate value if lower

Note: Plate value is the emission limit specified by the vehicle manufacturer and can be found on the vehicle manufacturer’s plate. If there’s no emission value on the manufacturer’s plate or it can’t be located, then the alternative default values must be used.

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Yes, it's me again.  I understand that diesel vehicles with a factory build date after 2008 are required to be fitted with DPFs.  So pre 2008 builds are presumably exempt from the visible smoke fail test.  It would be nice to have an authoritative answer on this important issue.

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I did a bit of reading on this just now, and everything I have found does suggest that your suspicions are right. If a vehicle that should be fitted with a DPF (2008 on) emits visible smoke then yes, it will fail. I think this is more designed to catch failed DPFs or those people who have had them removed. If you car is older than 2008 then I reckon there is no change to how smoke is tested.

In terms of defenders. I think DPFs were introduced in 2012 when the Tdci changed from 2.4 to 2.2 litres to meet emission regulations.

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It says in the link above "any visible smoke from a vehicle fitted with a DPF". So if your defender is pre-2012 you'll be fine.

I'm now more worried about the bit below that - "fluid leaks". I'm going to have to drain the oils before putting it through a test :lol:

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Euro 5 was introduced then, but I don't think the 2.4 Puma engines meet the Euro 5 standard. Euro 4 only some diesels had DPFs fitted. Euro 5, most if not all diesel engines were fitted to meet the requirement for lower particulates.

http://www.autolatest.com/news-cars/land-rover-defender-has-a-new-euro-5-engine-for-2012-2-2-tdci-ford-engine

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DPF are a waste of time anyway, when they self clean all the absorbed carp goes out the exhaust as normal, so IMHO a complete useless bit of kit. 

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I agree Ralph, and I also don't think switching to petrol or even electric cars are going to save us but unfortunately the people who decide the regulations don't see it that way.

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Thank you everybody; that is all most helpful.  Those vehicles that have DPFs ought then to present themselves for test before 19 May … and at least get a year's worth out of the system.

Best, David

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Or just get the vehicle up to scratch...

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I don't think it's been mentioned on here before, but there's another by product of the MOT changes:

Quote

If there's a 'Dangerous' fault, your car will automatically fail its MoT and can't be driven until a repair is made. A 'Major' defect also constitutes an MoT failure, but the car can be driven on the road to a place of repair, before a retest when the work is complete. A 'Minor' defect is comparable to today's Advisory notices and can be issued alongside an overall MoT pass.

http://www.carbuyer.co.uk/news/162254/new-mot-failure-categories-tougher-emissions-tests

So if you put your car in for MOT a month early, and it fails, you cannot drive it other than to home/a workshop until it's fixed - the old test cert is invalidated.

Previously you could still (probably unwisely!) drive it until the old cert expired... Think it will catch a lot of people out... 

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26 minutes ago, =jon= said:

I don't think it's been mentioned on here before, but there's another by product of the MOT changes:

http://www.carbuyer.co.uk/news/162254/new-mot-failure-categories-tougher-emissions-tests

So if you put your car in for MOT a month early, and it fails, you cannot drive it other than to home/a workshop until it's fixed - the old test cert is invalidated.

Previously you could still (probably unwisely!) drive it until the old cert expired... Think it will catch a lot of people out... 

The old MOT cert' is not invalidated, nothing has changed. The press keep getting this wrong.

Having an MOT  cert' does not exempt you from prosecution for a defect, it never has.

If you drive after a failure, or at any time with a defect and you still have valid MOT, the offence is related to the defect and that alone.

Drive with a defect or not, with an expired MOT and the offence is  no valid MOT plus whatever if any defect.

They  are two separate offences.

 

 

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Without getting into the semantics of driving a potential death trap, how quickly would the computers update a failure? Having checked my own vehicles after a pass it's been some time before DVLA shows the new information. This may (rightly or wrongly) allow enough time for some to gamble on the drive home...

 

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Been instant for me lately, I've been checking online rather than giving the garage a ring to see if it is done/passed.

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On 01/04/2018 at 8:50 AM, monkie said:

It says in the link above "any visible smoke from a vehicle fitted with a DPF". So if your defender is pre-2012 you'll be fine.

I'm now more worried about the bit below that - "fluid leaks". I'm going to have to drain the oils before putting it through a test :lol:

Take a ruler:

  • 8.4.1Fluid leaks
You must check for fluid leaks on all vehicles other than Class 3. You should do this with the engine idling.
A leak of fluids such as engine coolant, screen wash and fluid required for Selective Catalyst Reduction aren't reasons for failure.
You should fail a vehicle if a fluid leak creates a pool on the floor within 5 minutes that's more than 75mm in diameter or if there are many leaks which collectively leak fluid at the same rate.

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12 hours ago, Bowie69 said:

Been instant for me lately, I've been checking online rather than giving the garage a ring to see if it is done/passed.

My bike is due soon so I'll check it after its done to see if things have improved.

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I  recently had a vehicle tested that had been sorned and out of mot over the winter...... I taxed it online before I even left the testing station...... so instant!!

I also bought a brand new vehicle last week and transferre ownership online and taxed it before I left the dealership...

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I agree the new tax and registration online stuff is marvellous compared to the old post and wait routine!

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Yes... back when the offence was 'Not *displaying* a valid tax disc'.... 

You'll get chancers forever I reckon :) 

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Friend of mine used to love pushing his luck with tax discs, he was trading cars for a few years and wasn't above swapping a valid disc between cars - would remove it if he got pulled over as it's less serious to fail to display than display the wrong one :rolleyes: all this new stuff has ruined his fun!

Still, I have to say I give the DVLA props for having an online system that seems to work pretty well - compared to other gubmint IT projects like the abortion that is the HMRC self-assesment website for example :angry2:

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Out of interest, now the new MOT has been running for a few months.... has anyone fallen foul of any of the regulations with a smokey/leaky old Land Rover?

 

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