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dave88sw

P38 4.6 fuse blowing

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Hi,

Took my Range Rover to work today, everything functioning perfectly.  Parked up at home and when i went back out to it, it wouldn't crank over.  Cursed a lot and took the other car...

Anyway, had 5 minutes to look when i got home and fairly quickly established the starter relay wasn't clicking in, checked the fuse (no.40, engine bay fusebox) and it had blown.  It's a 40 amp fuse, only had 30's with me so stuck one in and it fired straight up, took it up the road and noticed the air suspension wasn't coming up and i couldn't hear the compressor.  Parked it up and wouldn't restart, fuse blown again.  No.40 is marked as air suspension and starter motor.  Took the cover off the compressor, it is red hot (would have been stone cold when i started it and i did less than a mile) and smells... burnt. 

I think i know the answer already but before i spend £180 on a compressor, is there anything else to check?  I assume, being a 40 amp fuse, it directly feeds the compressor?  I don't know why i doubt it but i just assumed the air suspension compressor would be one of the maxi fuses rather than a standard blade.

 

Thanks

Dave

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had the same just after buying mine,it was the compressor,fitted a new one ,no more griefthey have a habit of siezing after many hours of use apparently.easy way to check is unplug compressor and then fit new fuse and see if if everything else works ok,i drove mine like that for a couple of days while awaiting delivery of new compressor

Edited by ricckybail

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A friends did this recently, the crank on the compressor snapped and it blew the fuse. You can take the compressor apart and check it over but it sounds like you've burnt the motor out.

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I've heard (more generally) that a leak in the EAS system means the compressor works overtime & overheats itself, worth checking for an easily & cheaply fixed leak before splashing on a compressor.

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Dave, I think I still have a couple of old compressors hanging around.(I sold 45 of them a couple of years back...) So I should have enough bits to get you going again.I also have a couple of seal kits in stock for the compressor, but not a complete kit for the valve block. give me a bell if you want them.

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On 11/05/2018 at 2:17 PM, FridgeFreezer said:

I've heard (more generally) that a leak in the EAS system means the compressor works overtime & overheats itself, worth checking for an easily & cheaply fixed leak before splashing on a compressor.

This. But chances are the compressor is buggered too.

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1 hour ago, elbekko said:

This. But chances are the compressor is buggered too.

By now yes, but no point buggering a shiny new compressor! :P

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