Jump to content
2a-Egg

New user new 2a owner

Recommended Posts

Yours may be fine, the the photos show the fitting of a stainless steel sleeve over the place where the oil seal fits. It doesn't rust, and wears better than the original.

I normally fit them in preference to replacing the whole flange.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

This is where it seems to be the worst area

DSC-0041.jpg

Edited by 2a-Egg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Before you get into seals and stuff a really good clean of 40+years of crud will allow you to see exactly where it's coming from . TBH it looks pretty normal for an old series , a check of the bolts holding the seal ring to the TB nose would be worthwhile for a start - it doesn't look wet around the seal to drive flange surface ?

It could easily be the cork gaskets under the panels on the top of the TB too

cheers

Steve b

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, steve b said:

Before you get into seals and stuff a really good clean of 40+years of crud will allow you to see exactly where it's coming from . TBH it looks pretty normal for an old series , a check of the bolts holding the seal ring to the TB nose would be worthwhile for a start - it doesn't look wet around the seal to drive flange surface ?

It could easily be the cork gaskets under the panels on the top of the TB too

cheers

Steve b

You are right it's not wet there, it's very wet along the bottom of that unit. And it's dripping off the plug., to see the top I'm thinking it's through the seat box? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes . easy to see through the middle panel . It's worth checking all the joint bolts right through the boxes as over time they do become less tight.

Most of all though is clean it first - scraper first then Gunk or brake cleaner so you can see it all clearly

cheers

Steve b

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, steve b said:

Yes . easy to see through the middle panel . It's worth checking all the joint bolts right through the boxes as over time they do become less tight.

Most of all though is clean it first - scraper first then Gunk or brake cleaner so you can see it all clearly

cheers

Steve b

Great cheers will get onto that this weekend 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Find the leaks first. I didn't see any drip at that flange in your photos. The oil can be blown about when driving so find the source.

The big metal plate with the bung is a notorious leak point, it's steel, and the casing is Ali, so they expand at different temperatures.

I've taken to double gasketing there, and putting a reverse tension on the steel plate, so that the bolt holes tension the plate last.

So, if you put the plate down on a flat surface, the part of the mating surface with holes in would be slightly proud (1/2 mm) of the surface, compared to the rest.

But the better solution is to fit a Ali sump, which expands at the same rate as the casing.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Gazzar said:

Find the leaks first. I didn't see any drip at that flange in your photos. The oil can be blown about when driving so find the source.

The big metal plate with the bung is a notorious leak point, it's steel, and the casing is Ali, so they expand at different temperatures.

I've taken to double gasketing there, and putting a reverse tension on the steel plate, so that the bolt holes tension the plate last.

So, if you put the plate down on a flat surface, the part of the mating surface with holes in would be slightly proud (1/2 mm) of the surface, compared to the rest.

But the better solution is to fit a Ali sump, which expands at the same rate as the casing.

 

 

Definitely seems to be coming out the TB just not sure at what point of it... The sump is fitted with a new gasket and leaks in exactly the same place at rear which is pointing me towards the rear crank seal. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The other thing I meant to mention is to check the breather is clear - this is shared with the gearbox and is a small hole in the steel plate at the top of the gearbox, pretty sure the tunnel/floor needs to come out to access it although it may be accessible from the centre seat panel with some stiff wire bent at the end to poke in the hole .

leaks at the rear apart from the obvious oil seal  include checking for the felt seal under the O/P shaft washer and nut and also oil creeping between the tail housing / shim plates /transfer box

cheers

Steve b

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it were mine, I'd clean it, thoroughly, and then take it on a long drive. That will find the leaks.

I don't think it's the output seal, I'd expect to see a drip.

I presume that the oil level is to the top of the filler plug, and no more?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have taken the middle seat out and you only see the very rear of it all. It has the last 50+ years of Gunk on it, so started to get it off.. Can I get the gear ox tunnel off without going crazy taking anything else off?? 

DSC-0044.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you have to take the floor plates out.

 

A crate of brake cleaner or a power washer would make a difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Gazzar said:

I think you have to take the floor plates out.

 

A crate of brake cleaner or a power washer would make a difference.

Ah flat head screw driver to the rescue then ha. Least its the weekend, although I'm afew pints down and some malbec tonight.. Sunday maybe.. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Gazzar said:

I think you have to take the floor plates out.

 

A crate of brake cleaner or a power washer would make a difference.

Started to unbolt the floor plate. The bolts are as old as the car I think. Ones snapped on me. Will replace all bolts once I've got it up. Horrible feeling the leak is going to be in a crappy place. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes. It will be.

That's normal. 

Mine leaks at the selector shaft, but I've a cunning plan involving felt, PU adhesive and castor grease.

When reassembling, replace the clips where the bolts screw in. And think how you can prevent them seizing in the future. Research copper grease, and denso tape.

Remember, you only hold a series Landrover in trust, someday it will move on, be generous to the next holder.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Gazzar said:

 

Remember, you only hold a series Landrover in trust, someday it will move on, be generous to the next holder.

 

Hoping to keep this In trust for a fair few years and then hand it down. But that will depend on if and when I have someone to hand it too. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Had a few hours this afternoon and got the floor plate out of drivers side, will have to do pass side and tunnel to get a proper look. Also I swore at the 50year old bolts that were rusted in place. Then took the dremmal to them. Knew my random purchase of that thing years ago would pay off haha.. 

IMG-20190713-WA0013.jpg
IMG-20190713-WA0015.jpg
DSC-0045.jpg
DSC-0047.jpg
DSC-0046.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you have plans for the chassis? If it were mine I'd wirebrush the top of it, and put a preservation product on it. Bilt hamber dynax S50 is a good option, made in the UK.

The aerosols are handy, the wax comes out like a thin soluble mist, that soaks into seams and the dust, then sets to a thin membrane of wax.

Other products exist, dinitrol and waxoyl are traditional products.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Invest in an angle grinder. 4.5 inch. Get grinding disks and slitting disks, fasteners are cheap, time is precious. Use PPE.

Flap disks are good too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Gazzar said:

Invest in an angle grinder. 4.5 inch. Get grinding disks and slitting disks, fasteners are cheap, time is precious. Use PPE.

Flap disks are good too.

Got one bud, just not the space at moment to go crazy. That is the only hole I've found, it's on the front fuel tank  bracket. 

Want to at some point get it strip it and clean it off and waxoyl etc.. One day... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I totally understand.

I've been trying to find the time to do an oil change on mine for a month.

It also needs a lubes change, various seals, a bit of welding, timing belt change, air filter upgrade. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a lot of gunge on the end of the selector shaft, behind the 90 degree eye that the high /low ratio lever ball sits in.  The o-rings on the shafts probably need replacing.  Gazzar’s lightweight pages will show you where they are.

The whole transmission and engine would benefit from a Thor rough degreasing and jet wash, ideally a steam clean, before you start opening up any panels to replace seals.  Not only will that prevent dirt ingress and make the job easier and less disgusting, but will also allow you to spot subsequent or remaining leaks far more easily.  It’d be best to clean everything thorough and then run it a few days to allow small leaks to become visible before you go to the trouble of stripping stuff down, but your efforts in removing the floor and transmission cover will still pay of as you’ll need the access to clean them properly.

Aluminium transfer box bottom plates do help reduce leaks from that gasket, but they don’t eliminate them.  You’d need to use RTV sealant in place of the gasket for that, but the bolts still weep.  The drain plug will also continue weeping, even with a new copper washer. I suspect plumbers PTFE tape on the threads making it slightly tapered would be the only cure for that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have sealant. So that's a start ha. Can get ptfe easy enough. Just have to get the access and clean it up.. Part of me wants a big barn to strip it full back. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ultimately, you’ll have to.  The chassis is showing some areas of concern, though reparable.  That tank outrigger needs attention, but a patch let in would be more appropriate and probably stronger than a replacement.  The problem is that chassis rot from the inside out, especially where the cross members and outriggers are enclosed and fill with mud.  The dumb irons also fill and rot from inside where their drain holes above the spring eyes clog and the bumper retains mud and water.

A full rebuild is also more cathartic, though initially more daunting, than a rolling restoration because you know that it’s all done properly and will last many years before more work is required, while a rolling restoration is more like the Forth Bridge, never ending in its demands.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/14/2019 at 9:07 AM, Snagger said:

There is a lot of gunge on the end of the selector shaft, behind the 90 degree eye that the high /low ratio lever ball sits in.  The o-rings on the shafts probably need replacing.  Gazzar’s lightweight pages will show you where they are.

The whole transmission and engine would benefit from a Thor rough degreasing and jet wash, ideally a steam clean, before you start opening up any panels to replace seals.  Not only will that prevent dirt ingress and make the job easier and less disgusting, but will also allow you to spot subsequent or remaining leaks far more easily.  It’d be best to clean everything thorough and then run it a few days to allow small leaks to become visible before you go to the trouble of stripping stuff down, but your efforts in removing the floor and transmission cover will still pay of as you’ll need the access to clean them properly.

Aluminium transfer box bottom plates do help reduce leaks from that gasket, but they don’t eliminate them.  You’d need to use RTV sealant in place of the gasket for that, but the bolts still weep.  The drain plug will also continue weeping, even with a new copper washer. I suspect plumbers PTFE tape on the threads making it slightly tapered would be the only cure for that.

I just don't have the space to do a full strip down rebuild. Which is a pain as it is something it probably does need. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience. By using our website you agree to our Cookie Policy