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Jamie_grieve

Thoughts and musings on the new defender

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When the D3 first came out I took one out on one of the LRE courses and it made such easy work of it as to be boring - seemed to be lots of articulation and the traction control just took any skill out of negotiating the bits that would have needed an experienced hand in a coiler with diff lock. Any novice could have got round the course - and because I was an experienced driver we took the toughest lines.  When I took my old 2a station wagon through Mozambique a few months ago though,  I drove a heavy narrow sand track between some coastal towns, and had to mount a steep side slope sand bank to get round a new Range Rover which was floundering on its belly unable to move - suspension on full height, wheels spinning helplessly and only got out with a tow and a bunch of people shoving it.  It had been there a considerable time with local 4x4 traffic backed up a long way. The 2a easily climbed up, round and past the lot of them. I'd driven the same section several times in the 2a without a problem so either it was a case of very poor driving of the RR, or the newer chassis config isnt as competant outside of a test track.   Bit of both I think. 

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9 hours ago, BogMonster said:

This was our demonstrator which I took for a spin off road the first weekend we had it at the dealership. Crossaxled and completely unable to move forwards...

Whereas I'm sure a standard 110 on similar road tyres would've gotten much further :rolleyes:

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7 hours ago, FridgeFreezer said:

Whereas I'm sure a standard 110 on similar road tyres would've gotten much further :rolleyes:

Yes, 'cos the wheels would still have been on the ground :)

Everything I have seen in recent years appears to be engineered to work on a test track to sell a car, not in the real world when you start using it and want to use it every day. But that's sort of been the problem with all the recent models, they are very nice when they work. The last bit is the sticky area.

Bong bong bong............. :wacko:

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20 hours ago, BogMonster said:

:hysterical:

This was our demonstrator which I took for a spin off road the first weekend we had it at the dealership. Crossaxled and completely unable to move forwards...

P7230216.JPG

I have to ask. Where were you actually going? Was this a path to somewhere even more remote?!

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15 hours ago, reb78 said:

I have to ask. Where were you actually going? Was this a path to somewhere even more remote?!

On this occasion I was just out testing the new toy, but it's on a track a few miles from town and a piece of ground I knew fairly well. It's only about quarter of a mile from the nearest road so positively urban :)

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Personally I would take air over coils any day of the week. My old XJ6 lost a coil without warning whilst parked up and became an ornament right there.  Changing the spring was properly worrying as well.  Whereas my Disco 3 has a slow leak somewhere at the front and picks itself up each morning while I find where the air is going. On road, empty, the D3 has a really comfortable ride, with half a ton of scrap in it the ride was... exactly the same. I'm not convinced about the arguments against it in the sticks but the majority of buyers won't be there anyway, they will however want a vehicle that can account for load. 

I don't go in for serious off roading but certainly jacking the Disco shows huge amounts of wheel travel just as my Defender did. 

As for the brake light switch, I carry a spare in the glove box, genuine item and cost £23 to cover a known weakness so I can't see why the couple mentioned didn't do the same. The same applies to the compressor, if I was reliant on myself and vehicle I would protect it with a plate for a few quid exactly the same as I put a sump guard on my Defender. As for the bags themselves, they really aren't that big that they would stop me carrying a couple of spares against the cost of an overland trip and changing them is easier than a spring. 

My Defender was great fun, right up until I started to drive decent distances for work and then I wanted something that offered a better compromise. 

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8 hours ago, Ratty43 said:

My old XJ6 lost a coil without warning whilst parked up and became an ornament right there.

Is it me, or is it that coils were far more reliable in the 70's? I drove Macpherson strut suspended cars for 30 years before I had a coil break, but in the last 15 years, every car I have owned has broken a coil at some time...    I was told (perhaps somebody can confirm?) that the manufacturers used to shot-peen coil springs, but stopped because of profits (less cost in manufacture, and more replacement springs sold)

Anyway, back to the topic at hand - IMHO air springs can be great if the whole system is well engineered. And I agree with Ratty43 about loading - driving a loaded (not overloaded) 109" with a trailer was a frightening and bone jarring experience, driving an RRC in similar circumstances was way better, but driving the D4 is in a different league all together!

Air springs get my vote...

Rog

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3 hours ago, ThreeSheds said:

Is it me, or is it that coils were far more reliable in the 70's? I drove Macpherson strut suspended cars for 30 years before I had a coil break, but in the last 15 years, every car I have owned has broken a coil at some time...    I was told (perhaps somebody can confirm?) that the manufacturers used to shot-peen coil springs, but stopped because of profits (less cost in manufacture, and more replacement springs sold)

I'm driving around on factory springs on my 1991 Audi, best part of thirty years old...

Agree it seems more common on newer vehicles -their vast weight can't be helping, nor the trend for very firm rides, nor the state of the roads at the moment.

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OH's Ibiza snapped a coil or two, one whilst parked. Apparently it's more common nowadays as they push the limits of making springs smaller, lighter, and therefore stiffer for a given section, they're much more snappy now.

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I've done 3 springs on my van in the last 2 years. The front one wound down and dug into the top of the tyre whilst my dad was driving. :unsure: I've got the 4th on the passenger seat for when it's not raining as a precaution. 

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I wonder if most of todays springs are made with cheap poor quality Chinese steel....?

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I seem to remember some years ago the up-tick in broken springs was blamed on a change in the manufacturing process. That was by "Honest John" in the Saturday Daily Telegraph column. I think he said it was something to do with not finishing the ends off properly, allowing corrosion in where they sit at the bottom.

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All mine have broken within a few inches of the ends. 

I could believe the Chinese steel theory, getting quality steel is very difficult now. It int like wen I were a lad eee by gum. 

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Posted (edited)

Oddly enough mine broke in two places in the middle, it was a genuine Jaguar one being original so 1989 vintage. I'm certain it was caused by hitting the cut edge of roadworks in France. The other one snapped within weeks but both were some time after the event. 

Edited by Ratty43
Predictive text!

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Not sure about the paint job.

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Thanks for posting, I couldn't bring myself to do it. I still think there's an elaborate hoax going on.

 

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They should have called it the Discovery commercial , can’t believe it’s taken this long to come up with something that looks just like everything else they sell . Assuming that is the finished one.

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It may have some additional pumped up styling to keep people guessing on the shape.

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Do we really care ?

I, for one, will not buy one.

Doing between 40,000 - 50,000 miles a year, D3, D4 and the various RR's were discounted on cost, reputation etc.

To meet all sorts of standards, this model will be another computer on wheels and made not to be worked on by the owners..

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More importantly, why is prince harry standing like that ?

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13 minutes ago, Ozzy50 said:

More importantly, why is prince harry standing like that ?

The other guy is striking the same pose, I suggest that it may be to convey a caring and all embracing metrosexual image to match that of a vehicle presumably designed with plenty of storage for various manbags.

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59 minutes ago, Ozzy50 said:

More importantly, why is prince harry standing like that ?

According to the news, he's just had a baby....

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It's all right, think how the Austin mini evolved into the BMW mini. 

This looks like a Peugeot defender.

It will meet the emissions regs, drive like a car, pull a trailer, cope with trails.

And last as long as the warranty.

Job done, I'd say.

 

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