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Blanco

Bit of a bench in the making

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As it was a pleasant afternoon, got the bandsaw fired up to clean up the sleepers I had aquired to make a bench top, ..... yes it is a tad on the substantial side.

Toasted two blades, sleepers are full of unfriendly grit etc. which is almost impossible to remove.

IMG_20181006_155136.jpg

IMG_20181006_155610.jpg

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Nice

But please note the obvious : the are regarded as chemical waste and working in the industry, we treat them as such..

The dust etc. is not good.

But once in place, they will do just fine !

Love your mobile sawmachine..

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Rules seem a bit behind over here, already in France (3 years ago for me)  they were very difficult to get hold of, a shame as most were oak not softwood. These are all softwood and one is full of old fashioned creosote.

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I have milled the French oak sleepers with the bandsaw with very little trouble, perhaps the grit sticks in the grain of the softwood more easily? When the big mill goes (which it will this Winter) I thought I might go for an Alaskan if I needed to do another timber frame ever. Slower but probably more flexible.

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Italy replaced 100's kms. of oak sleepers in the late '90's on the HSL's for concrete and the Continental market was floaded with them.

Very good quality - some less than a year old...

These days, nobody wants them..

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Ah but I think they are tropical hardwood with no preservative treatment. Used to be a company called Jarrah Design or Jarrah Furniture in the North west of England did some nice pieces, don't know if they are still about. I'll have to look them up.

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8 hours ago, Blanco said:

Ah but I think they are tropical hardwood with no preservative treatment. Used to be a company called Jarrah Design or Jarrah Furniture in the North west of England did some nice pieces, don't know if they are still about. I'll have to look them up.

Most of the sleepers we had were Jarrah and Karri, some Oak from the early days, apparently.

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Was the Jarrah imported I wonder or did/does SA have a native species?

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14 hours ago, Blanco said:

Was the Jarrah imported I wonder or did/does SA have a native species?

It is an invasive import form Australia. We have Eucalyptus, Black Wattle and Port Jackson Willow which are varying degrees of nuisance, depending where you live. 

We have Port Jackson in the Western Cape that regularly contributes to the big fires we have when our local Fynbos does it's regeneration burn.

On the other hand, Eucalyptus in the fireplace really gives a good burn, plus, my wife's lungs don't mind it as opposed to Port Jackson which has her wheezing in short order.

I remember hearing as a kid that sleepers were Rhodesian Teak, but that was phased out in favour of the locally grown Jarrah.

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