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Gazzar

Trailer Floor preservation

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My old trailer has to live outside, and the buffalo board is starting to show it's age.  I intend to rebuild some decade soon, but until then I'd rather preserve what I have.

What's the best treatment to seal and preserve the board?  I was think of pitch or something, but worry that it would be too gooey.

 

Any better products? Raptor?

 

Thanks.

 

G.

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What sort of trailer are we talking about ?

-  car transporter type

-  live stock

-  general cargo

What size floor are we talking about ?

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Flat bed, it can take a 110. Or a range rover.

Twin axle, like an Ifor Williams.

 

I've no pictures of it on this phone.

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Having watched the replacement (£350) buffalo board on my 14' flat bed turn to mush in 5 years I will be using hardwood planking this time . If it's the original board - which lasted 26 yrs. on mine - I'd probably use creosote mixed with engine oil regularly .   Some sort of storage cover with an angled top surface will help no end as I've come to realise...

My trailer is a BCR btw.

cheers

Steve b

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The plan is to devise a tilting dolly for it, so I can tip it on it's side and wheel it into a small space that I have in mind for it, however, that's not going to happen soon.

I think a cover is a good idea - I might rig up a centre ridge bar and a tarp.

It's been in the workshop since july and is bone dry, so I kind of feel that a decent barrier paint may be a good plan.  Maybe Sadolin?  Expensive, but very good.

 

Thanks,

 

G.

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I was looking at 18mm Stockbord the other day and thinking it might make a good trailer floor. 

Expensive, but then so is the proper Buffalo board type. And if it lasts forever...?

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I think you'll find the stockboard and buffalo board pretty similar in price - I know which I would have, even if it needed a little more support underneath.

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If you're thinking of planking it - then Keruing could be what you're looking for.  Used for planking horse trailer floors and I think for planking on jettys.  Described to me as "jungle mahogany."

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I had it in mind to refloor my flat bed with scaffold planks. I'd leave small gaps between, not just for expansion but too prevent the wet festering between planks.

Not decided what to coat with but not creosote as that can get slippery. Maybe a decking preservative would work, but I think regular recoating is key to longevity.

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So, simply getting paint on the boards where the coating has gone, will do?

I'll mix in some sand for grip.

Good excuse to use up some of the tins of paint I've kicking about.

 

Thanks. 

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Or use fibre board as used for waffle boards/sand ladders. I did my Ifor LM146 (??) in 22mm.

It sat outside for a long time but as it has holes in it the water drains through and doesn't puddle

As it's fibreglass it doesn't rot, and when I did mine it cost a massive £50 and it's also fairly light.

It's carried about 3t of "treasure" at various times, Rand Rovers and Disco's  so plenty strong enough

Mark

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On 10/27/2018 at 1:44 AM, mel said:

Or use fibre board as used for waffle boards/sand ladders. I did my Ifor LM146 (??) in 22mm.

It sat outside for a long time but as it has holes in it the water drains through and doesn't puddle

As it's fibreglass it doesn't rot, and when I did mine it cost a massive £50 and it's also fairly light.

It's carried about 3t of "treasure" at various times, Rand Rovers and Disco's  so plenty strong enough

Mark

You can get the same stuff but with a grippy flat top on it. Use it at work on walkways and duct covers. 

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The plan is just to preserve the floor until I do a proper job, and as it's been drying in the workshop for a few months, this is the time.

The plan is to reseal the gaps in the floor with PU sealant, cheapo stuff, and then paint several layers of oil or xylene based paint, mixed with sand, on top.  The idea is simply to keep the rain from getting to the buffolo board. 

This will be quick and dirty, I simply don't have time to do a decent job right now.

 

G.

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First coat done.

 

I used Xylene based paint, as I figured it would grab the oil soaked boards better. 

Next coat will be floor paint, solvent based, mixed with sand, and I think I'll paint pitch on top.

Getting there, but the boards aren't all that bad, aside from the wear.

IMG_20181120_101525.jpg

IMG_20181120_110528.jpg

IMG_20181120_110702.jpg

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I've used Readsons paints on farm machinery before. Man, can that give you a headache, even in an open barn !

I hope the Xylene doesn't melt the glues in the ply :o

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Dries fast!

I was able to put a top coat on this last night. It's a lovely shade of green, photos in a bit.

I'm going to put a final layer of paintable pitch on top, when I get a chance. That should leave it weather proof for a good few years.

 

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I'm not convinced the second coat worked. There was a lot of oil spilt on the boards, once, and that has stopped the paint binding with the boards.

Anyway, I've top coated with pitch, so all done and now outside.

IMG_20181124_110715.jpg

IMG_20181125_104844.jpg

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I might have to sand the pitch, but that's fine.

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19 hours ago, Gazzar said:

I'm not convinced the second coat worked. There was a lot of oil spilt on the boards, once, and that has stopped the paint binding with the boards.

 

Unless you are looking for aesthetics as well as protection, I wouldn't bother with the oiled bits. Chances are the oil will protect the wood anyway and your application would cover the rest of it that wasn't oiled.

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I think you are right. Thanks.

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Working!

IMG_20181130_134732.jpg

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We had a load of tins of bitumen primer returned to work as one of the tins got damaged in transit and the whole pallet got covered in it. I painted (well, poured it on and allowed it to spread itself :unsure: ) all of the wooden container floors with it to try stop them going rotten. I now have big puddles like you do where the water condensation that drips off the roof puddles as it doesn't soak into the floor. I guess that's a good thing for the life of the wood, hopefully no one will slip :blink:

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That reminds me, I do have to insulate the container.

Anyone know about 2 pack spray on foam?

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On 12/12/2018 at 7:54 PM, Gazzar said:

That reminds me, I do have to insulate the container.

Anyone know about 2 pack spray on foam?

What about the ally or steel faced foam sandwich panels they use for industrial cold rooms?

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