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Thommo55

Disc Brakes

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My son and I are building a 1973 Series 3 - we want to convert to power disc brakes on the front, where is the best place to buy a kit?

 

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If I wasn't making my own conversion (taken far too long due to no time or no money, now no garage!) I would use the Zeus kit if it is available. The Haystee one looked too bespoke when I looked at it though that was a long time ago and has changed since then.

There is plenty to read about on this forum if you search it. Most will be DIY but some is using kits.

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We have Zeus on 4 wheels.

Fit & forget.

 

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I'm looking at fitting the Haystee kits all round once I've finished the 2a rebuild, to expensive to do during the rebuild plus I've already fitted a complete set of brakes, swivel's and stuff to the axles now so I will run all these bits first whilst saving for the Haystee kits :)

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On 11/22/2018 at 9:36 PM, Thommo55 said:

My son and I are building a 1973 Series 3 - we want to convert to power disc brakes on the front, where is the best place to buy a kit?

 

Servo assisted brakes are normal on SIIIs, and a quantum leap over the single line, non-assisted brakes of the SIII.  Disc brakes, however, are not a significant improvement.  They have a couple of minor advantages, but don't increase brake effectiveness over decent standard brakes.  Why do you want discs?  It'll help us give the best advice.

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On ‎11‎/‎25‎/‎2018 at 4:32 PM, Snagger said:

Servo assisted brakes are normal on SIIIs, and a quantum leap over the single line, non-assisted brakes of the SIII.  Disc brakes, however, are not a significant improvement.  They have a couple of minor advantages, but don't increase brake effectiveness over decent standard brakes.  Why do you want discs?  It'll help us give the best advice.

I  totally agree about the performance, I converted my then 90 a few years back to disc's on the back and although there wasn't much difference in performance between drum's and disc's on the back the pads and disc's was a lot easier to keep an eye on and maintenance was a lot easier aswell which is what i'm after on the 2a :)

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Good enough.  As long as you know the costs and what actual benefits you're getting, then you can make an informed decision.  Quite a lot of people think they're going to get much shorter stopping distances, and most of them are sorely disappointed with the results.  As long as your motivation is ease of maintenance or better cooling, then your expectations are realistic!

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I am hoping for less brake fade, as well. Stopping from speed was very exciting the last time I left it a bit late:)

 

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Drums should manage one hard stop with ease.  It's repeated heavy braking that exceeds their energy capacity.  Discs cool a bit quicker but are not immune.  Driving style is important: on a trip around the Alps, one of the guys with a 110 had red hot discs at the bottom of a long mountain road descent.  I got there no more than five minutes later with cold drums on the 109.  If you have to use your brakes more frequently due tot he nature of your local roads, then discs may be worth the money, but hopefully you can just adjust the driving style which will also save fuel in addition to the brakes.

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Many years ago now, i was introduced into a completely new way of braking. The Ambulance service senior driving instructor tought us about Cadence braking. ( Part of the old Police Drivers book  called Road Craft )This i later put into practice whilst driving my 2.25 Diesel at that time.  Cadence braking along with the engine braking of the diesel and being in the correct gear changed the way i drove completely and i still drive using this method today. Any members on here who knows Rivelin Valley Road, Hillsborough Sheffield will know of Hagg Hill, that's one hill you do NOT want to experience brake fade especially in winter, it's lethal. Must be a 1 in 5 in parts Look it up on Google maps.

Brake fade on on this hill has been the cause of many many accidents at the bottom of that hill, onto the main Rivelin Vally Road. Even new cars with Anti lock brakes. Yes the new kits are far easier to maintain and quicker to change the pads etc etc but are by no means the be all and end all. 

On my drive through Ecclesfield when the snow and ice was 8 inch deep, i had no problems negotiating the steep hills at all. You just have to change down earlier, let the engine do it's job, cadence brake if need be and your ok. Driving old school, for want of a better term..

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