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Reciprocating saws

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I am considering adding one of these to my toolbox. My intended use would be to cut off stubborn nuts and bolts where it is either impossible to cut off with an angle grinder or there is a potential to cause damage.

 

Anti roll bar drop link bolts are something I am specifically thinking off. have resorted to a hacksaw for a few now and its not the most fun way to spend your life.

 

Has anyone used for this sort of thing? What are they like?

 

I would buy this one as I already have the batteries and the rest of my Makita tools have been great

 

https://www.powertoolworld.co.uk/makita-djr187z-18v-lxt-cordless-brushless-reciprocating-saw-body-only

 

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I have a corded one from DeWalt, and it has come in handy. Mind you, it's not always the best or easiest solution. As you say, you can reach bolts etc that are difficult with an angle grinder. And you get more control. It is important to chose the correct blades (as always). I used a standard blade on suspension bolts and only got half way. The Bosch heavy metal seem to last better. To get the best results, you need to be working on something solid and be able to rest the saw against it, so you don't lose reciprocating motion.

Once you have one, you'll find plenty of uses for it. The flexibility of battery power will be a big bonus as well.

Filip

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I have a smaller Milwaukee one, it is excellent, a very, very useful tool indeed.

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I’ve got the very model you have listed. Not used a great deal, but it’s excellent when used and got plenty of grunt. I already have a load of Makita 18v batteries so it sits well. 

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Think I need to get one ordered! 

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they are brilliant and makita ones are spot on.

 

the cheap titan one i had on the other hand lasted about 6 months before the chuck broke (into 3 pieces) and stopped me being able to change blades.

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A recip saw would not be my 1st choice for this, or for a tool that will then be useful around the workshop. They're a bit brute-force, ideal if you're demolishing something but not if you're trying to make something.

I've owned one for a decade and can count on the fingers of one hand the number of times I've dug it out for a specific task that couldn't be done with another tool like a grinder. Fein tool is more accurate for low-clearance cutting and more versatile, and even that ends up mostly used for DIY not metal things.

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Fridge, do you mean one of these? https://www.angliatoolcentre.co.uk/makita-dtm51zjx7-18v-quick-change-multi-tool-body-only-pid41221.html

Would it be capable of cutting through something like an M10 Nut and bolt on a drop link?

 

Drop links waste lots of my time as they are so difficult to get off if they just spin

 

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Yes that sort of thing. Capability is quite dependent on the blade, and I've not used one to cut thick steel as the grinder has always worked for that.

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Fein/Multitool was the best tool I bought, used for lots of things but only had to cut nails with it, not bolts.

But the right blade is essential as the standard blades are only bi-metal (for aluminium and copper)

I found that https://www.saxtonblades.co.uk/fein-multimaster-bosch-makita-compatible-blades

was a good place to get blades and other accessories

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..... interesting,.... I've tried a couple of times to cut panelwork (steel) with one and the blade (bi-metal) didn't last at all. Now I go back to the Saxton site I see there are more options for metal, which I am sure weren't there before? Are the titanium any good or has it got to be carbide?

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The best place I’ve found for multi tool blades Is Amazon. Compounded if one has a prime account, then the blades normally come with one day or so. I use Saxton blades. I found they are a good choice between cost and quality.

I’ve got a corded multi tool, simply because I don’t work on sites without power and the cable on the tool is around 3mtrs long so generally plenty long enough. 

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Commenting just because other people may have a Screwfix locally, and can use their Click & Collect' service.

I cannot really comment on the most suitable reciprocating saw blades, because although I spent some time reading the User reviews, and buying my best choices for metal and for wood (separate blades) they haven't had enough use to clearly demonstrate how wonderful my choices were!!

So it's just 'Screwfix are there, have a varied selection, and may suit your living arrangements'.

Regards.

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55 minutes ago, jason110 said:

The best place I’ve found for multi tool blades Is Amazon. Compounded if one has a prime account, then the blades normally come with one day or so. I use Saxton blades. I found they are a good choice between cost and quality.

I’ve got a corded multi tool, simply because I don’t work on sites without power and the cable on the tool is around 3mtrs long so generally plenty long enough. 

Yeah I bought mine Saxton from Amazon, they are cheaper than direct from Saxton 🤣
Reading the reviews the titanium seem to get better reviews than the carbide for metal but I'm sure that people are probably going to fast with the multitool as Saxton site says " Please be aware that these blades will fail quicker if they overheat. Try using the Multitool on a lower speed and use the whole width of the blade without using excess pressure. Use a suitable cutting oil. This will add to the longevity of the blades. "

This gets me thinking my multitool goes from 6000 to 23000 spm whereas a Reciprocating saw tend to go from 0 to 2700 spm so I would say for metal that a Reciprocating  saw is less likely to overheat the blade on metal but has similar access issue to a hand hacksaw.

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