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Retroanaconda

New workshop project

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I knew they would be heavy, particularly the wider one, so each door will have three 750mm band & gudgeon hinges. These have a large weight capacity, though they can be a pain to line up compared to standard tee hinges.

The piece of sawn timber visible to the sides of the opening is where the hinges will bolt to - this bears straight onto the wall studs and the bolts will go right through.

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7 hours ago, Retroanaconda said:

Yes the plan is to paint the floor, will help to seal and protect the concrete as well as being nicer to work on. I’ll probably try the company that @FridgeFreezer used as that seemed to work well for him. I must resist the temptation to start moving things in beforehand, as I know that if I have to empty things out to do it then it will never get done.

Walls too - light grey for the floor and white on the walls, though the latter will be bog standard emulsion :D

For the floor you could roll on Upol Raptor. 2 coats would give you a very hard wearing surface that’s resistive to fuel, oil spills. 

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14 hours ago, David Sparkes said:

Has this made you review the number, size, and style of hinges you will be using?

Not to mention the hinge post! ....... looking very tidy that:i-m_so_happy:

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Yeah I never got around to painting my walls, several years on :unsure:

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The hinge posts is a good point - I'm planning to add extra wall-to-slab brackets to the areas around where the doors will hang to ensure that nothing is pulled out of line, and will either fit the internal wall sheathing first so that it doesn't all move when I remove the braces or I'll jack the weight off the door while I do so. Probably the latter as weather-tightness is the main priority at the moment. Happily the big door will open more or less in line with the longest wall of the building and right on the corner, so the lever effect has got the biggest resistance for that direction. Unfortunately I'm unlikely to be able to get the bits I need to hang them now due to the lockdown, but it can wait.

Raptor is the textured stuff isn't it? I'm looking to be left with a smooth surface for ease of use and cleaning.

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23 minutes ago, Retroanaconda said:

The hinge posts is a good point - I'm planning to add extra wall-to-slab brackets to the areas around where the doors will hang to ensure that nothing is pulled out of line, and will either fit the internal wall sheathing first so that it doesn't all move when I remove the braces or I'll jack the weight off the door while I do so. Probably the latter as weather-tightness is the main priority at the moment. Happily the big door will open more or less in line with the longest wall of the building and right on the corner, so the lever effect has got the biggest resistance for that direction. Unfortunately I'm unlikely to be able to get the bits I need to hang them now due to the lockdown, but it can wait.

Raptor is the textured stuff isn't it? I'm looking to be left with a smooth surface for ease of use and cleaning.

Worth getting one of the spring loaded wheels for the door to run on? at least take some of the weight?

Raptor can be put on either way, textured or smooth. Surely its going to be more expensive than normal epoxy type floor coverings?

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Impressive woodworking skills there!

 

When I built some timber garage doors (with vastly inferior skills BTW!) I used ply gussets on all the joints to stop the doors dropping when they were hung. Not terribly attractive, but the doors didn't budge!

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22 hours ago, landroversforever said:

Worth getting one of the spring loaded wheels for the door to run on? at least take some of the weight?

Raptor can be put on either way, textured or smooth. Surely its going to be more expensive than normal epoxy type floor coverings?

The sprung wheel could be an idea - thanks. I think normal epoxy floor paint is likely to be my best bet.

 

11 minutes ago, bishbosh said:

Impressive woodworking skills there!

 

When I built some timber garage doors (with vastly inferior skills BTW!) I used ply gussets on all the joints to stop the doors dropping when they were hung. Not terribly attractive, but the doors didn't budge!

Thanks - they're more rough and ready than they look. The tenons are quite neat as I've done those with the circular saw but the mortices have been done with a 1/2" auger bit and squared off with a chisel :D

The internal faces of the doors - once the internal cavity has been insulated - will be sheathed with OSB like the rest of the structure. This will add extra rigidity although I've tried to design it into the frames themselves so I'm not relying on it.

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Managed to get the necessary bits and pieces from Screwfix this week, so have had a knackering day hanging doors.

The eagle-eyed amongst you may notice there’s a bit of cladding missing - most annoyingly I was one piece short so I’ll have to wait until the timber merchant is open again to get another.

The alignment isn’t perfect, these hinges are a pig to set up, but it’s not far off. The big door might need to come up a few mm in time, but the main thing is that they’re on and they’ll keep the worst of the rain out. Seals are on order to hopefully make them fully weathertight.

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Good work!

It's coming together nicely. You have to make the most of the dry weather!

Steve

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That looks great James! :wub: 

I agree on the hinges... took ages doing the ones on my extra bit of space as theres so much slack in the pin/strap.

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Looks fabulous 😊👍🏻
 

With you having orientated the hinges the same way (i.e all upwards from the pictures) then you should be able to space the door up by just putting washers in...

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Thanks guys. Yeah I could add a washer to lift it a bit, I’d need to wait until I’ve got the engine crane up here though to have any chance of getting it back on again. 

Will have a go at fitting the windows tomorrow :i-m_so_happy:

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Good shout. Although the door can’t be lifted as it’s inset, it would stop the hinges being undone and the door pulled outwards. 

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38 minutes ago, Retroanaconda said:

Thanks guys. Yeah I could add a washer to lift it a bit, I’d need to wait until I’ve got the engine crane up here though to have any chance of getting it back on again. 

Will have a go at fitting the windows tomorrow :i-m_so_happy:

You don't need to lift the door off, just take the weight off the pins, undo one at a time and add washer when refitting.

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39 minutes ago, Retroanaconda said:

Thanks guys. Yeah I could add a washer to lift it a bit, I’d need to wait until I’ve got the engine crane up here though to have any chance of getting it back on again. 

Will have a go at fitting the windows tomorrow :i-m_so_happy:

Could you jack the door up still on the hinges - then take the hinges off one at a time and refit with the washer on? 
 

That way the hinges still hold the door whilst the jack creates the space for the washers.

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1 minute ago, Anderzander said:

@ballcock and I with the same idea at the same time.

Simple answers often the best.

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Depending how thick the pegs are on the male part of the hinge you could just drill a small hole through then fit a small bolt , which is how we doo it at work with the gates .

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Good idea guys, that will work with a trolley jack easily enough. The hinges themselves are fixed with very big screws for now, but I’ll be fitting coach bolts once I can buy some long enough so I’ll do it when that time comes.

The doors are captive by the frame so can’t be lifted, however some hinge bolts won’t hurt as suggested so I’ll look at getting some. I’ll also be replacing one more of the screws on each of the bands with a coach bolt. 

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36 minutes ago, ianmayco68 said:

Depending how thick the pegs are on the male part of the hinge you could just drill a small hole through then fit a small bolt , which is how we doo it at work with the gates .

The pins are 19mm so plenty of room for that if need be.

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Looks very, very nice !

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