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paime

Bulkhead woes

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Posted (edited)

Hi Guys,

So i started the strip down last night in preparation for repairing the bulkhead. When i got the dashboard out the rust wasn't as bad as i thought (thankfully!) however there are a number of areas of surface rust. I'll plate in some places but what's the best way to deal with the surface rust? I've used Jenolite in the past but it didn't work as well as i'd hoped but then again maybe it was the way i applied it.

Also, i'm thinking about repairing the A-pillar, how difficult a job is it to weld in the replacement piece? The seam is pretty rusty where the door seal sits so i'll need to do something to make it solid.

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Edited by paime

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Bon Courage !!!!!!

I have a spare bulkhead that is planned for a LHD conversion, the heater mods and than it gets dipped.

.... just like the spare VHD 110 chassis I have sitting here.

Been there, done that, etc. : the Series chassis & bulkhead that was dipped 30 years ago and stil solid etc.

I HATE rust.
 

Good luck with the welding and CAD repair sections !!

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I've considered getting an old bulkhead, fixing it up then getting it galved but the cost of even rotten 2nd hand bulkheads is eye watering. A new galvanised one is also crazy expensive. I wish i'd bought a few bulkheads 10/15 years ago and stored them for selling later!

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I'm glad I did! Bought a new TDI bulkhead for £100. 

It's going in my series, converted to metal dash, 2a style.

Though if someone was to offer silly money, I'd sell and rebuild the series 3 one I also have.

 

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Gazzar , will you post up a thread when you convert the bulkhead to a 2A ? It's something  I'm considering for my '62 109 sw . The only good bit on the original one is the dash steelwork...

I already have the galv. chassis and having a firm plan for the bulkhead would clear time to address the other big rust area , the B post/sill assembly.

Paime , have you considered using a small sand blast pot to clean back those rust patches ? They look like a spray gun , the sand goes in the pot and is drawn up by the airflow . A good coat of zinc paste onto clean metal should stabilise it

cheers

Steve b  

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1 hour ago, steve b said:

Paime , have you considered using a small sand blast pot to clean back those rust patches ? They look like a spray gun , the sand goes in the pot and is drawn up by the airflow . A good coat of zinc paste onto clean metal should stabilise it

cheers

Steve b  

Might give this a bash. My original plan was a flap disc and some red oxide across the whole dash but i want to make sure it's done right first time as when the dash goes in i'll never see it again. The engine-side of the bulkhead is actually pretty good so i shouldn't have to get in and do too much in there.

My next decision is what to do with the A pillar - any thoughts?

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So....i had a mobile welding chap out to the house last night to review the various rusty patches and he was considerably more upbeat than i've been. The outriggers are shot through unfortunately and he's estimating £240 / side if i buy the new bits. Is that a reasonable amount to pay for a pair of outriggers? It would be something like £550 including parts i guess. I've already removed floor plans/dash/wing etc so he'll get at it no bother.

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Thats way to expensive in my opinion if you remove everything connected to the bulkhead so it is just a case of cutting old one off and cleaning up for welding new outrigger that would be 30 -60 minutes depending upon skill level once prepared its just a matter of putting new outrigger into position fit bulkhead bolt clamp rigger to chassis and weld this would be less than an hour per side this would be 4hrs total which is a very generous amount of time in my opinion considering your removing stuff to give good access this equates to a little over a £100 per hour for that sort of money you could buy a mig and do it yourself after practicing on some scrap steel ultimately you would be able to tackle any future repairs as welding repairs are a staple diet of landrover . Hope this helps regards Stephen

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I have been considering my options when it comes to welding the new part in myself but i'm terrified i'll make a mess of it and throw the chassis out of line or just keep blowing holes in it until there's not much left and i've got to phone the professionals anyway!

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Just to reassure  You will not pull the chassis out of line with the outriggers  if you were using stick welding you could blow holes in as stick welding is definately harder to master mig in comparison is very easy gaps can be filled easily  and you have much more control just ensure material to be welded  is clean watch a couple of you tube videos on setting machine up and you will be pleasantly  suprised how easy it can be you would only require a cheaper machine initially and then move to a better one as your confidence  improves if you are  not in a rush for the repairs it is worth considering regards Stephen

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i think i might use a flap disc tonight and see what the metal is like around the outrigger. I've read quite a few threads on here about how to do it but it's my own ability i have no confidence in!

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If you are going to replace it anyway, you have an whole outrigger to practice on. 😉

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43 minutes ago, MR-HIPPO said:

If you are going to replace it anyway, you have an whole outrigger to practice on. 😉

There's not much left to work with unfortunately!

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 You have the confidence to remove the floor etc and attacking stuff with a grinder this would also have been out of your comfort Zone at some point in your life Mig welding is seriously easy to get the hang of in comparison to other welding techniques You could possibly even hire one for a week to explore whether it is viable to go down that route without incurring significant cost Bits of metal plate are easily and economically obtained from your local scrap man / steel recyclers I quite often get aluminium, steel or stainless plate pieces at very reasonable prices even ask some mates that may have access to there scrap skip at work for a few bits to practice on. When I was learning to use my tig our local guy gave me some bits to practice on he reasoned he was getting the bits back slightly heavier with my splutterings on win win for both of us  Regards Stephen

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Fortune favours the brave and all that! I think i'll hire one for the week and see how i get on first. I've tried stick welding before and it was a nightmare and the only MIG i've used in the past has been a cheaper unit and i just got splatter all over the place. Maybe with a better machine and some more time i can get the hang of it enough to let me do the bits and pieces i need to do.

Re the outriggers, how do you support the bulkhead whilst you're cutting them out?

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Posted (edited)

If you do one side at a time the bulkhead should stay in place as it will be supported by the other side gearbox tunnel will also aid support as will the brackets that extend onto the chassis from the footwells in the engine bay remove the bolt that fastens to the outrigger first if it does drop slightly put the bolt back in and support it with some wood on a jack then remove bolt and continue going back to the mig spatter all over the place could be down to work piece not clean enough wire feed too high for the current settings holding the torch too far away i think the common analogy is if you have it right it should sound like frying bacon good luck you will find it very satisfying when you get it right  just try some spot welds first to get the feel regards Stephen 

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Cheers Stephen, you've given me the confidence to at least give it a go! Being Scottish, the thought of saving some money is also a big motivator! Expect some welding pics on here soonish....

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5%CO2 /Argon gas will help to give you the best chance of clean good welds , also make sure you have a good 240v supply to the welding plant and try to minimize any extension leads . 0.6 or 0.8mm wire , clean metal , and good gloves and mask and a comfortable welding position are the other main  points to bear in mind

Practice on the bench first to get settings that suit you and the work .

cheers

Steve b  

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Go for it, it's a good 1st project and you can afford to f*** up a few times before you get near what it'd cost you to get someone else to do it anyway!

BTW an alternative to stock repair bits is to go all @dirtydiesel and use fckoff bits of box section... :D

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Cheesy peeps!! That thing looks like it'll survive a nuclear bombing!

You lot have persuaded me to at least give it a bash so that's what i'm going to do. Just need to find myself a decent welder now that won't blow my budget too much. I like the look of the SuperMig130 but do i need to have the luxury of controlling amperage as well as wire feed speed? It just has a high/low setting for power.

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I'd be looking to get something at minimum of 160A really, for LR stuff.

You'll soon run out of amps on larger stuff otherwise.

Second hand commercial kit is about the same as new hobby stuff, see if you have anything local on ebay or Gumtree etc.

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"Which welder" has been covered here before, as Bowie says used industrial kit can be a better bet than flimsier new "hobby" kit. As a minimum you want a Euro torch and ready for a gas bottle.

0.8mm wire feeds easier than the 0.6 a lot come with.

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i've been doing some frantic research today and i think i'm going to go for a 150amp gas/gasless MIG unit either Sealey or Clark. I've been looking at 2nd hand stuff as well and there's precious little up here in Aberdeen by the looks of it.

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Do not use it in gasless mode, you will learn only to hate yourself.

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