Jump to content
jordan_meakin

Buying a Range Rover classic

Recommended Posts

Yours will be attached the distributor at that age, so get one that looks like it will. The older one fits to the wing and is quite different.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wondered if that was it, goes to the ECU which explains your explanation of why it could be the fault. I'll be ordering bits and considering how cheap they are, I'll just get one.

Thanks for all the help. I'll report back!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just don't buy the cheapest bits - avoid Britpart.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, I replaced the ignition module, now it's dead. It was one that required the three pin adaptor plug. With no end of fiddling, got that on but now there's nothing. So, either I've done something wrong or the new module is dead. It's frustrating because I had to cut the old plug off to fit the new one so can't simply swap to the old one easily. I've never had this before but want to check, the distributor can only slot back in to one position? Obviously I marked up for the timing etc. but it did take a bit of fiddling to get back in... Marked plug leads up etc. too so can rule out the obvious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It has just occured to me that I've cocked up, will need to reset on TDC. Any advice? It's much more straightforward on a four cylinder series.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last time I had to faff with dizzy timing on my V8 we couldn't make it NOT run no matter where we put the damn thing...

Follow the timing mark & crank pointer, get the rotor arm pointed at the right lead and twiddle from there I think.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Definitely won't go. I haven't inspected but is the mark and pointer at the top? Also, how do folks "turn over by hand"? How are the cylinders numbered? Haynes manual on the way!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, the pointer is on top. Not always to be trusted to be accurate, but it'll get you in the ballpark. 

2ae0833a-755a-4740-b8fa-4cc0d9d3342b.jpg

I usually turn the engine with a socket on the crank pulley nut, only going clockwise. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, jordan_meakin said:

Also, how do folks "turn over by hand"?

27mm socket (wheel nut size) on the crank nut from memory.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the help chaps. Any easier way of knowing if the exhaust valves are closed other than taking the rocker cover off?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you checked for spark?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, all running again. Firstly, pretty sure the new module was faulty. Secondly, I had managed to knock the oil pump drive out of line from the distributor drive so it wouldn't all marry up, hence why the timing didn't make sense. Running again now but still with the original fault. Learnt a lot though so thanks for your very useful advice. Back to fault diagnosing!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/25/2019 at 7:44 AM, Shackleton said:

Hi Jordan,

That's my video above, chuffed to see it thanks lads.

</snip>

 

Ahh, so it's you!

Have to say the missus was watching this with me a little while back and we both had a chuckle.

Possibly one of the best no-BS deliveries I've ever seen and both of us just kept nodding and laughing in agreement.

Love the vids!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Without trying to dissuade you or send you on a diagnostic path, there are a few things other than static timing and sensors that you need to check.

1. did you have the distributor apart, did you disassemble, clean relube and reassemble the mech advance? (you should have)

2. the distributor shaft needs to be checked for endplay and side play. this will cause a cycle of "I checked it and there's still a misfire" ignition issues.

3. the hall sensor needs to be checked and the trigger clearance needs to be correctly set, taking into account the freeplay in the shaft.

4. the retainer washer is problematic on the top of the shaft. There is a modification where the top is tapped for an m4 thread and small screw/washer/socket screw is used to fix this and prevent the damage that invariably occurs when an owner tries to remove a rotor that"wont come off the shaft". Ironically it's the attempts to remove problematic stuck rotors that cause misfires....

5. the rollover switch under the passenger seat needs to be checked and cleaned / lubed and reset - this can cause intermittent cutouts similar to a failing dizzy module.

6. relocating the module to the inner guard near the coil / air intake is a very straightforward useful modification. It guarantees you keep the module from thermal cycling overheating issues.

7, you should check the idle air control solenoid valve on the rear of the plenum. disassemble, clean and reinstall with a new copper washer.

8. static timing in the order of approx 12ºBTDC is a good place to start for tuning, depending on the octane rating and your engine's compression.

9. the fuel pump wiring needs to be thoroughly checked, the fuel pump may even require replacement, as should the fuel filter and the fuel pressure regulator needs to be checked for correct operating range.

10. new rotor, cap and leads as well as quality plugs will make a difference.

 

I chased a similar issue to you when I first obtained my RRC back in 2014.

I went through all manner of 'forum opinion' given I was never a landrover owner prior to this ( and won't be buying another ;) )

I ended up curing nearly all of my issues with a reasonably comprehensive rewiring of the electrics, which included the fundamental areas mentioned above.

I found the sensors were all fine. The issue was the verdigris in many of the connectors and contacts on the wiring harness. much was fixed with a mixture of almost bopiling water and baking soda, zinc chloride flux and resoldering connectors, several cans of CO cleaner and DeoxIT and many connectors removed or replaced, then reassembled and sprayed with lanolin grease.

a new ignition switch, removal of the fusible links in the engine bay short harness, replacing them with proper fusible links (like modern disco) in an IP rated enclosure, new fuel pump, and distributor module, coil, leads, distributor overhaul (including the mods) and new genuine lucas rotor and cap (yes lucas! I know!) all progressively replaced over the first 3 months of ownership in an effort to track down the culprit was an expense I did not forsee upon purchase.

It wasn't until I took a serious look at the RRC's electrics that I ended up finding a number of quite significant voltage drops across several circuits that caused the 'ah-Ha!' moment which forced me to pull the entire lower dash out and check every single circuit. 90% of my problems were related to poor electrical contact and were easily fixed. Some were wear and tear related (indicator stalks, headlamp switch, ignition switch etc.  Relays were put on the ignition to protect the switch (a LR wtf moment surely) and the headlamps.

Bear in mind my RRC never saw any offroad use before I purchased it and the P.O. had fastidiously maintained this every 5000km (records) for 11 years prior.

Turns out that the first owner (I am 3rd) was a bit "lax" and cheap on the post-warranty care (and likely the JLA dealerships were worse) and many of the unresolved omnipresent and previously undiagnosed issues which reared their ugly heads in the first 3 months of my ownership were all electrical related - and more ironically never required 'attention' until the vehicle was sold... read into that what you wish...

Start with getting yourself a copy of RAVE, study it, and then go and test everything. remove any suspect wiring, clean every earth, clean every contact. 

That and a really thorough mechanical and fluid servicing, including a flush treatment on the oil and a new trans filter service kit, as well as TC, diffs and swivels.

It's amazing what you will find. and fix!

I have to say despite my loathing for LR as a company and the absolute carp build quality control and electrical design, the RRC has endearing qualities.  It is one of the reasons I own one. I could have quite easily made the sensible decision and bought a w461 gelandewagen, which would have been logical -  but the RRC always ha some kind of mystical luxury cache coupled with LR DNA with me, and while a perentie would have been a more appropriate choice for me from an LR perspective, the RRC is what I wanted.

They are basic, and even though build quality is atrocious, they are dead easy to maintain and repair.

Ultimately this is why they have a bit of a cult following I believe. After all, that is Land Rover's unofficial byline...... "Turning owners into Mechanics since 1959"

back on topic though...  you need rave ETM and you need to start checking the wiring as well as the mechanical stuff. follow logic and process. don't get sidetracked by other contributing factors until you have verified the DUT and made a determination as to whether it is working as designed or not.

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience. By using our website you agree to our Cookie Policy