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Adam001

Door alignment and B/C post change

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Hi all!

 

So I rebuilt my 110 (1988) about 7 years ago and I did not consider door alignment, really, at all! I was concentrating so much on galvanic corrosion and adding gaskets I didn't realise how much I affected the door gaps, which are now awful, which combined with series doors is a recipe for wind and water!

So I could do with some advice on how best to re-align the whole body. I also plan to change the B-C-Sill section for a YRM galv one as mine is getting tired.

Had a good hunt through the forums but couldn't find much, most are to do with the challenge of repairing the rust in these areas!

What have others done in regards to aligning the gaps down the body, is there a good step by step process to follow, front to back etc? I would like to avoid removing the seat box as my electrics are heavily dependent on it.

 

Cheers,

Adam

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There are some specs for gaps in one of the manuals believe it or not.

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Posted (edited)

This might help although pictures not great regards Stephen

 

 

 

20190627_083011.jpg

20190627_083021.jpg

20190627_083027.jpg

Edited by Stellaghost
Better pictures
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That's great cheers.

Guess I just use my existing doors to gauge the existing spacing. 

 

Anyone have any guidance on how to tackle this completely. I'm guessing the start point is to set the bulkhead perfectly perpendicular and square on the chassis and then adjust everything else off that?

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no , common misstake , you start at the back and work your way forward.

bolt the rear bed to the chassis with the rear 8 m8 bolts , then set the 2nd row door space (adjusting the b/c post with washers) , then set the gap for the front doors (adjusting the bulkhead with washers). if everything is perfect bolt the whole thing together 

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Curious! My chassis (marsland) has a adjustable rear tub support strip. How thoughts how I tackle that going back to front? 

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no idea , original chassis has welded plate's to mount the rear tub .

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The front face of the rearmost body mounts on the rear crossmember should be flush with the rear face of the crossmember. Once lined up a check from the vertical door seal edge of the rear tub to the bulkhead A post rear face should confirm position , then shims and washers as required :) 

You shouldn't need to remove anything apart from the floor panels probably , but you will probably need to loosen all the mountings . It takes a while , but oh boy is it worth it when all the gaps are nice and the doors shut and seal*

cheers

Steve b

 

* definition in the LR supplemental manual on leak-proofing......

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"Once lined up a check from the vertical door seal edge of the rear tub to the bulkhead A post rear face should confirm position , then shims and washers as required   "

Didn't quite understand this bit?

 

Hmm sealing doors would be nice!

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On 6/28/2019 at 4:43 PM, Adam001 said:

Curious! My chassis (marsland) has a adjustable rear tub support strip. How thoughts how I tackle that going back to front? 

One of the reasons the adjustable chassis rail was introduced for 1999 was to combat rear body distortion. Look at any factory chassis such as on a Puma and the rear crossmember is not straight all the way across- the outer sections always distort when the crossmember is welded to the main rails. The adjustable rail is to allow for the body to be bolted to the crossmember without being affected by this distortion.

To set the rear body up on the late crossmember the body sits on the outside of the mounting rail (I’ve seen a few where people have mounted the rail on the outside of the body!). You then adjust the rear body so it is vertically in line with centre face of rear crossmember.

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Indeed, but worth noting that if you're rebuilding an old vehicle onto a new chassis you need to have the tabs on the outside of the bodywork as the nut plates are captive on the body. That's why some are like that. Later vehicles which came from the factory with this rail had the captive plates welded to the rail itself, so that went behind the bodywork.

If you buy a new Marsland Chassis for a pre-Td5 vehicle you get the rail without captive nuts, Td5 and on you get the one with them fitted.

The principle is the same however, start at the back and work forward. Start with the body parallel with the rear crossmember but be prepared to tweak it if necessary to get your door gaps depending on outriggers etc.

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Right brill. James is bob on with the rail, mine has no captive nuts so is placed on the outside of my body being a 1988 with the TD5 style crossmember. Learnt something new, photos on google were really confusing me then!

Will have to amass some parts and give this a good go, doesn't seem too bad but my car has lots of repair sections (Including the full tub floor, upstand etc) so who knows!!

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