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Bolt code break down

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Hey all,

 

Im pretty sure I saw it here on LR4x4, it was a break down to the code/part numbers for LR bolts. It enabled us to figure out thread, length head type etc. I searched but could not find it

 

cheers

Serg

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6 minutes ago, Vogler said:

 

J

Thanks J,

 

alas I was hoping for a break down of the old 6 number codes. All good

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Ah, pitty. Did you see the other links further down in the topic too?

Greetings,

Joris (Sorry for the basic 'J' earlier today).

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1 hour ago, Vogler said:

Ah, pitty. Did you see the other links further down in the topic too?

Greetings,

Joris (Sorry for the basic 'J' earlier today).

Hi Joris,

 

yes, I clicked on everything I could lol. Best I can do is google the part number and hope the specs are listed other than just bolt etc. I havent been able to detect a code in them yet

 

237357 - 7/16 x 1 3/8 BSF king pin bolt

237339 - 3/8 x 1 BSF Stub axle bolt

279146 3/8 x 1 7/8 UNF (unsure of length) Drive flange bolt

538802 3/8 x ?? UNF  Disc rotor to hub bolt

I assume they would all be high tensile in those applications

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Try on lrseries.com sometimes they item description shows the thread size & type. 

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You probably won't detect a code pattern, LR seemed to allocate numbers in an almost random pattern, probably based on a particular assembly rather than the physical characteristics of the Nut, Screw, Washer, or Bolt.
This started with the Series 1, and was then expanded into the Series II, then IIA, etc. Numbers only started to be rationalised once LR stopped being LR and became part of BMC, British Leyland, etc.
And yes, anything that isn't a BA size is intended to be high tensile.

A little depends on where you are coming from, and what the desired outcome is.

Are you looking through original parts manuals, using the often 6 digit number to then identify the physical characteristics so you can buy from a nut & bolt stockist?
Or are you happy to convert the 6 digit number to a modern equivalent number so you can order from a LR specialist?
In the latter case knowing the physical characteristics is more a 'nice to know' rather than essential, as you have to trust the LR stockist has got the conversion correct.

Perhaps your location of Gold Coast, Australia, influences your approach, but I can only comment on UK experience.
Overall it is often cheaper to buy any specialist bolts from an LR stockist; they will be geared to handle orders of small quantities, even one or two (although LR Dealers will often only sell in multiples of 5). A mainstream nut and bolt stockist will want to sell by the box, especially for oddball sizes such as BSF.

The recommendation to use LRSeries to get a physical description is good, although not infallible they are probably better than the rest.
Britcar can also be useful in this regard.
Craddocks is the most likely site to recognise an obsolete number and give you a modern equivalent.

Regard none of them as infallible.

The other site that will always recognise an old number, but just tell you it's use and price, is LR Fasteners. Again, not infallible; sometimes the use you want it for is not what they list (but you may well be correct, a fastener may serve more than one purpose). LR Fasteners will sell you a kit for a complete vehicle, bagged and labelled, and I understand they will sell kits for complete assemblies, although I haven't availed myself of the opportunity. I also understand he prefers to talk on the phone rather than use email, but you can only ask if exceptions can be made, given your location and Time Zone.
Expect to pay for the service, those who have paid sing about the convenience, regarding the price as a temporary hiccup.

Regards.

 

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