Jump to content
Keith1984

86 Defender110 Hcap .. engine replacement

Recommended Posts

A little TD5 story....

We had a client come in with what turned out to be a seized camshaft.  Terrible job on a TD5 as the head bolts etc have to be replaced.  Anyway we got the head line bored to fit the camshaft which was not damaged.  Then we started looking for what caused the camshaft to seize.  The client said the oil light did not come on but we didn't believe him of course.  Took the sump off to check the oil pump chain etc.   We found the oil inlet gauze was full of little bits of rubber.  Now we were wondering where this came from?  I noticed that bits of the rubber were red and black and then we figured out that it was the fan belt which had somehow got into the engine and been chewed up by the dreaded oil pump pulley and chain.  Less said about that the better.  The fan belt had been replaced not long before.  It seems that when the fan belt breaks it winds itself around the external pulley and pushes bits of the belt past the oil seal and into the engine.  The oil seal was also damaged on this engine causing leakage.  I have photos of this somewhere...  Apparently the same thing can happen to Freelanders when the belt breaks. 

We had a theory that the chain-driven oil pump was caused by the committee that designed the engine forgot to have an oil pump.  So they got the tea lady to design a little chain driven pump.  In all my days as an engineer I have never come across anything so idiotic.  All engines I have known have a direct drive oil pump not some sort of botched up addon. 

... and the mains and big-end bearings are not indexed which is really wierd.   Previous Rover engines were designed by engineers and not cost accountants. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some trucks have belt driven oil pumps now. MAN, I think, are one.

Apparently they are reliable. Not convinced, but I suspect that these new ideas do work well. On version 2.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aren't the merc OM60x oil pumps chain drive?

They're donkeys years old and one of the most long lasting engines about....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Period look: 2.5 NA

Period power: V8

Easy, cheap, powerful enough : 200/300 tdi

****s and giggles:td5 om606 m57 6bt LS chevvy....

 

@JimAttrill I'm sure you have some horror stories of tdi cam belts, split header tanks failed lift/vacum pumps? Sure TD5s have their issues but they are pretty bloody good in my experience for reliability/cost/power/weight/economy of course not to everyones taste/job but as an allrounder...

 

Will.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, muddy said:

I'm sure you have some horror stories of tdi cam belts, split header tanks failed lift/vacum pumps? Sure TD5s have their issues but they are pretty bloody good in my experience for reliability/cost/power/weight/economy of course not to everyones taste/job but as an allrounder..

There's horror stories for every vehicle and every part - always someone who's had a couple of bad experiences or thinks something (usually whatever they've got in their truck, coincidentally) is the best thing in the world ever.

I've run all manner of stuff that people on the internet have told me will be awful and explode and be useless and unreliable and so far they've all been great :lol: in fact the best thing I've run was my 1800 Freelander which is a vehicle that gets just about the most hate / worst reputation possible! I really doubt that I can be so exceptionally lucky, after all my lottery numbers still haven't come up :(

There's a lot of stuff people like to point at and deride as being terrible engineering but they forget that every nut and bolt on a modern car has thousands of hours of R&D and testing / optimisation behind it and often there's 50 reasons for it to be that way despite the 1 or 2 reasons you think it's stupid.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/28/2019 at 8:24 AM, JimAttrill said:

A little TD5 story....

We had a client come in with what turned out to be a seized camshaft.  Terrible job on a TD5 as the head bolts etc have to be replaced.  Anyway we got the head line bored to fit the camshaft which was not damaged.  Then we started looking for what caused the camshaft to seize.  The client said the oil light did not come on but we didn't believe him of course.  Took the sump off to check the oil pump chain etc.   We found the oil inlet gauze was full of little bits of rubber.  Now we were wondering where this came from?  I noticed that bits of the rubber were red and black and then we figured out that it was the fan belt which had somehow got into the engine and been chewed up by the dreaded oil pump pulley and chain.  Less said about that the better.  The fan belt had been replaced not long before.  It seems that when the fan belt breaks it winds itself around the external pulley and pushes bits of the belt past the oil seal and into the engine.  The oil seal was also damaged on this engine causing leakage.  I have photos of this somewhere...  Apparently the same thing can happen to Freelanders when the belt breaks. 

We had a theory that the chain-driven oil pump was caused by the committee that designed the engine forgot to have an oil pump.  So they got the tea lady to design a little chain driven pump.  In all my days as an engineer I have never come across anything so idiotic.  All engines I have known have a direct drive oil pump not some sort of botched up addon. 

... and the mains and big-end bearings are not indexed which is really wierd.   Previous Rover engines were designed by engineers and not cost accountants. 

Some VW TDI and PD engines have chain driven oil pumps, the later common rail engines have a hex key driving the oil pump, this sits in a splined socket on the balance shaft, they wear out and the pump fails. However, in their ultimate wisdom, VW only had the oil pressure warning light come on when the engine exceeds 2000 rpm, so, normal speeds and a RPM of about 1500 and you have no oil pressure and the next thing you know is the turbo (variable vane) fails and the damage done. Makes the TD5 look like an angel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

21st-century oil-pumps are fun! No more simple dumb clockwork things depending on a primitive pressure-relief valve to manage pressure - that's wasteful-of-energy. Now we have proper variable-displacement pumps that are regulated (like a variable-nozzle turbo that holds boost constant over a wide range of RPM/loads) so the pressure sits at 3 Bar irrespective of whether the engine's doing 800 or 5500RPM or the oil's at -45 or +145 Centigrade.

An old-style oil-pump stirring thick, cold oil can consume at least 1BHP at high revs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience. By using our website you agree to our Cookie Policy