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Gazzar

2.5 petrol rebuild and conversion to EFI thread?

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It was You who showed me these swirl & pump tanks! 

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I can plumb a return from the s&p tank, using a tee, a switch-over relay and a pair of12v fuel stop solenoids to ensure the return is into the same tank as the supply.

(Cheaper tanks available - for example only)

I think this will work.

It also does away with the need to have a swirl chamber in the main tanks.

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With a twin tank setup it does get complicated, although why you'd need a swirl chamber in the tank I don't know - LR never bothered!

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I think I was more concerned about driving on side slopes and up hills.

 

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Engine cleaning commences.

I know, I know. Chemical is quicker. This is therapeutic. And allows to see the strange castings and random holes.

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What goes here?

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A block heater is an option in that port.

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3 hours ago, Snagger said:

A block heater is an option in that port.

Ah! Interesting. Very interesting.

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As a matter of interest, are you sure that it is a 2.5? The reason I ask is that it appears to have a paper element type oil filter housing rather than a spin on filter type. I have a couple of 2.5 petrols, one is a very early one and both have spin on filters. They are both engine no. prefix 17H. My understanding was that Land Rover stopped fitting the older series style paper element type when the 2.5 superseded the 2286 in 1985. The 2286 looked identical to the 2.5 and was fitted to the 1983 to 1985 Land Rover 110 and 90 (1984/5). Perhaps someone retro fitted the paper element type oil filter housing, or perhaps there were both types fitted to the 2.5? I'd be interested to know if anyone has the answer. Regards, Diff.

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It's a 17H block, with the plastic tensioner, so I think it's definitely a 2495cc.

The filter might have been changed over from a series, as it was in a series motor before I bought it.

Here's another question. I'm fitting a series oil cooler to this, because I have one and it's a lightweight, but, is the TDI 200 oil cooler filter housing better than the series sandwich block? On account of it having a thermostat?

I'll plumb the return direct into the sump.

 

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I *think* the lightweight oil cooler has a thermostat in it, doesn't it?

Must apologise, I forgot we had been round the house on twin tank fuel setups before :) 

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No apology necessary, I find I go around the houses a lot, so often revisit old ideas that I've rejected previously.

I prefer to think of it as "willing to admit I'm wrong".

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11 hours ago, Diff said:

As a matter of interest, are you sure that it is a 2.5? The reason I ask is that it appears to have a paper element type oil filter housing rather than a spin on filter type. I have a couple of 2.5 petrols, one is a very early one and both have spin on filters. They are both engine no. prefix 17H. My understanding was that Land Rover stopped fitting the older series style paper element type when the 2.5 superseded the 2286 in 1985. The 2286 looked identical to the 2.5 and was fitted to the 1983 to 1985 Land Rover 110 and 90 (1984/5). Perhaps someone retro fitted the paper element type oil filter housing, or perhaps there were both types fitted to the 2.5? I'd be interested to know if anyone has the answer. Regards, Diff.

Plus, all fixings are metric (so far....)

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My oscilloscope arrived. £20. Some assembly required.

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Nice little thing that - certainly worth having around the workshop for £20!

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I think it will help understand what the sensors are telling the ECU. Which will help me translate to the tuner studio program.

 

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4 hours ago, Gazzar said:

I think it will help understand what the sensors are telling the ECU. Which will help me translate to the tuner studio program.

You may be disappointed - the only sensor that varies that fast is the VR sensor, the rest are just a slow-moving resistance based on temperature, it's really a very simple thing!

Some of the other signals vary faster - PIP, SAW, the coils and injection pulses and the PWM idle valve are all going much faster.

Last I looked PicoTech (makers of the PicoScope USB oscilloscope) had a whole section on their website of "automotive waveforms" like that.

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More reading!

Thanks.

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4 hours ago, Gazzar said:

I expect I'll need that!

I dunno, EDIS is pretty simple - if it's got power & ground it will fire unless you've got the VR sensor wires reversed.

Direct coil drive can be a little more involved as you have to twiddle the set-point of the zero-crossing detect circuit but it's no biggie - it's possible to do the twiddling on the bench.

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One day I'll understand what you just said. Today isn't that day.

  • Haha 1

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Very cool toy! I've never had call to use a scope when setting up efi, though. Pretty much everything is a multi-meter job measuring resistance or voltage. The one time a portable scope would have been interesting would have been when running a VR crank sensor on a BMW which was picking up some noise at high rpm. Even so, it was easy enough to look at the data from the ecu and figure out that the shielding wasn't working correctly without resorting to the scope. Pretty much every other sensor is quite boring to look at as they change comparatively slowly, the data logger captures anyway and the log viewer displays it all nicely graphed. 

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On 1/6/2020 at 2:42 PM, Bowie69 said:

I *think* the lightweight oil cooler has a thermostat in it, doesn't it?

Must apologise, I forgot we had been round the house on twin tank fuel setups before :) 

I don’t think so.  The oil pressure relief valve in the pump gets blanked off, and a pressure operated valve is fitted in the oil line that diverts excess oil around the cooler circuit in parallel to the main flow through the engine.

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