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Looking fab, similar to my block after it was rebored & I used the same brand pistons from Turners. 

I would suggest buying 4 new oil jet bolts as these contain small relief valves they could make a difference to oil spary to undrside of pistons & bores & help increase oil pressure to.

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I’ll check the cost Ralph although I have made sure that they work with a blow and a push with a bit of wire at the same time. Plus I’ve had them out and in twice!!

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I'm wondering about the merits of fitting an oil pressure gauge. I would go for a 0-5 Bar version of a VDO gauge like this one and a suitable sender / t-piece although I'd need to do some research to get the correct threads etc.

First thoughts are that it would be a good idea but I have a feeling that it might not show much detail. Will a gauge show a degrading oil pump or failing bearings or does the wear, when it happens, cause a sudden drop in pressure that trips the pressure switch anyway? I think that when the latter happens it's already too late.

What experiences do people have?

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Sometimes it's the little things that make life so much easier. 

The pressure gauge will be quite revelling. I can even tell on mine when the oil is getting hot! I have that exact setup and I'd not now be without it. 

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I was wondering this too. I first thought that the gauge should sit at the far end of the engine, after the wear, say at the cam bearings.

But, thinking it through, I think that the gauge should sit near where the oil light sensor does now. The filter.

On a tee piece if necessary. 

Reason being, I think, If the bearings wear, then the pressure at the filter will drop, as the oil gets "out" easier through the worn bearings, there is less pressure everywhere in the system. So it doesn't matter whether you site the sender.

I might be wrong, though.

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There's a selection of adapters for sale from different places,  1/8" npt into the existing pressure switch port, with the same on the other end for the re-fitted switch and a M10 tee for the electric gauge adapter, like this one from demon-tweaks. Their sender unit is a bit pricey though, here at  £42 (although I swear it was £63 a few minutes ago) and the gauge too of course.

So the ££ mount-up but if it really is providing useful information and it's not just a fancy indicator giving nothing more than the on-off too late pressure switch then maybe teh ££ are well spent.

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5 minutes ago, Peaklander said:

So the ££ mount-up but if it really is providing useful information and it's not just a fancy indicator giving nothing more than the on-off too late pressure switch then maybe teh ££ are well spent

I think mine came as a kit and I don't remember thinking it was expensive. Absolutely essential if you care about what's happening with your engine IMHO, though! I can even tell when the oil level is getting lower, and I could probably guesstimate the outside temp based on the gauge behaviour! Lol

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This is how I fitted the oil pressure sender the first time I did one but it looks very vulnerable to vibration or other damage so although I did not have any problems with it, when I changed the engine I drilled through into the gallery at the bottom of the arrowed port. I then tapped the port 3/8 BSP, and fitted a 3/8 BSPP(M) - 1/8NPT(F) adapter and mounted the oil pressure sender direct to the port. It's much more rigid and tucked away from damage here. 

Note also the addition of the oil temperature sender. This is threaded direct into the casting, which is fairly thin at this point so it requires careful threading, and I stuck the sender in with hydraulic seal so it did not need to be done up very tight to seal. 

@Peaklander, If you do go for a VDO gauge, I have some of the proper three terminal connectors for the back of the gauge.

 

P1140016.JPG

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The 12j to 200Tdi all share the same filter housing and some of the components of the 300 housing.  All have oil pressure gauges fitted just like on the 300 housing above, whether they be capillaries to mechanical gauges or senders to electrical gauges.  The brass blanking plug in the similar position to where the arrow is above is removed to fit a temperature sender for an electrical gauge.

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12 hours ago, nickwilliams said:

Here it is fitted:

Thanks Nick. Yes that does look a little less flimsy although I acknowledge that @western has had the more conventional set-up on his 200TDi for a number of years. In researching the VDO sender options I see that they do a warning contact option on some so that you have the analogue and digital sensing.

There are a number of low pressure settings (0.4, 0.5 and 1.4 Bar) for the sensor type specified with 1/8"NPT. This would screw directly into the existing pressure switch location which could then be removed and reduce the plumbing, but I have no idea what sort of pressure to select.

Perhaps I should just continue with the re-assembly and retro-fit later when I have a running vehicle again.

So to progress. The pistons were installed using a ring compressor obtained from NW Toolhire (😀) and I found it surprisingly easy to use. I did use tube on the conrod bolts and then fitted the new bearing shells and caps.

IMG_1025.thumb.jpeg.91cb8eeb76425cca24fb7cca6852fda1.jpeg

 

An Elring gasket (no hole - thickest one - same as came off) was used, as that's the brand that everyone seems to recommend and I used a new set of bolts. I know that the manual says re-use up to five times but the engine rebuild place said use new and the Elring insert that shows the tightening sequence also requires new ones.

So in they went with the sequence marked on as I was doing this on my own and didn't trust myself to remember the pattern (although I have had to do much harder things in life). I did remember to mount the airbox bracket, which uses two head bolts to locate. What an utter pain it must be if this is forgotten. Thanks to @nickwilliams for that top tip. I had a big label hanging there that I couldn't miss seeing, until the bracket was in.

IMG_1026.thumb.jpeg.781fcdd99fd956525d7ce2063323902d.jpeg

IMG_1033.thumb.jpeg.5508bb177948807ba416348f1fc2de62.jpeg

 

Then, having looked for days at angle torque gauges and reading that they can be very flimsy, I made my own and torqued the bolts up. The short socket extension allows the metal to turn inside the hole through the card, a ty-wrap stops the card slipping down and then a sturdy wire pointer taped to the extension, acted as the angle pointer. The card has to be held with one hand so it does slip and not turn and the torque was applied with a one-hand breaker bar. This was easy enough until the extra 20 degree turn on the eight big bolts where one arm was only just enough. 💪

IMG_1034.thumb.jpeg.ceed87ae13f0d2822a57001b8a183b17.jpeg

So now it's a re-assembly job. I have a new gasket and O-ring for the oil pick-up / strainer and for the turbo oil feed. The manifold gasket is intact and only a few miles old.

I have started to tidy-up the intercooler with a pair of circuit board pliers as the front and back are a bit damaged. It's only a few little pieces that break off when bent back but at least then the airflow into the rest will be improved. I looked at the eBay <£100 ones and wondered if they would be any better than mine with some TLC and decided that they wouldn't.

 

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Ok it’s all back together. I had that horrible moment when all that was left on the bench were three m8 nuts. No rust so clearly from an oily place but where? I had a think and then more. Then convinced myself that they weren’t from the engine strip. Then told myself off beside they must have been.

After going through all the undoings again in my head I still couldn’t work it out but in thinking about the reassembly I realised that they are from the three studs that pass through the rocker cover to take the top fastening. The nuts push down onto three of the rocker shaft pedestals. It’s also located with two bolts and that’s where I went wrong. So that was easy.

I have a new fuel filter which is full of diesel, 9 litres of coolant (capacity is 11.5) at 50:50 mix. Can’t get anymore in. Also 6.5 litres of running in oil (capacity with new oil filter is 6.65) which has taken the level over the dip mark but I haven’t primed the filter. 
 

The injectors are cracked open ready to bleed through as it is cranked. What then though? I have read a lot about going straight for a warm up and then a fairly aggressive run in but that would be  without checking for leaks on the drive where the engine would have to idle to temperature.

What should I do, trust my leak free assembly and immediately drive to get hot quickly and then check and continue with some miles?

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I'd disconnect the stop solenoid and build oil pressure first. Then do what you say. I think big leaks will be fairly obvious, small ones you can look for  with some running. 

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Ah ok so crank it without diesel supply first, then connect so that I can bleed to the injectors and let it fire. How many cranking turns will it need to build oil pressure? The battery is fully charged.

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I'd give it 10-15 sec bursts and let the starter rest a bit between; if you have no oil in the filter it'll take a few goes to fill that. Once the oil light goes out, give it a couple of seconds more. Then bleed etc and fire up. Let it idle for a bit and check for leaks, before a local run just in case. Assuming you have oiled all the bits as you assembled?

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Finger crossed obvs. I think you'll have to see how it feels - if it feels tight don't go mad, but equally avoid being ridiculously gentle, You said the hone had increased the friction, I think the thing is just use it without extremes.

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I'm not stupid, honestly but when you read the next bit you might wonder. I have discovered that my oil pressure switch is no good. I honestly don't know when it stopped working but I went out to crank the engine, switched on the ignition and nothing. The cable back is OK, as the warning lamp works when it is touched to ground but the switch, which should be normally closed, isn't.

I find this highly embarrassing but I thought I'd admit it on here as part of my penance. Happily I can drive over the moor to a car parts place and pick a new one up in an hour.

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