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LT230T differential pictures


Vogler
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Good that you like it.

The R sure looks different, thanks for posting that photo! It seems to have considerably larger holes to let oil into the diff carrier.

Mads, it didn't look as sparkly when I opened the casing, it was more like the land of Mordor covered in black sticky oil. The last year I did seem to notice more heat coming from the gearbox tunnel.

I also made a gif of the diff gear, with an Ashcroft cross pin. Stupidly I forgot to include the copper shims in the pics.

The shims were completely gone when I disassembled the transfer box. One can see the circular scratches that the satellite gears made due to the absence of shims.

Greetings,

Joris

download-20200211-220821.gif

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15 hours ago, western said:

The R at the end of LT230R means it has parallel ROLLER bearings, whereas the T in LT230T means it has later TAPER roller bearings.

What difference can this make? Curious.

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Might be wrong but a taper bearing will need some preloading to seat everything properly. They're normally used when there are anticipated to be strong radial loads (if that's the right term). Think of a wheel bearing with two taper roller bearings set up opposite each other.

If you can picture it a normal roller bearing if used for a wheel would put much more loading onto one side of the rollers than the other. By using taper bearings the load is pushed more evenly across the bearing surface, but you need two of them to sit opposite one another.

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22 minutes ago, FridgeFreezer said:

2007-01-30_18.jpg

Intermediate shaft bearings - LT230T at the top, LT230R at the bottom. Personally I think the R looks a better design (much more bearing surface, larger pin to spread load on casing) but I'm no gearboxologist.

I'd have thought as the bearings wear on the roller variant you're going to get the shaft wobbling around a lot more and you can't alleviate this like on a wheel bearing by tensioning (which is what I assume the thread is for on the taper version).

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True enough Ed, although I wonder if the roller bearings would wear more slowly having much grater area?

While we're here, worth noting that the R has yellow metal thrust washers either end of this shaft to take side-loads, and given the LT230 propensity for elongating the hole in the case perhaps the R having a larger shaft and not taking any clamping load through the case would resist that particular failure?

LT230R.jpg.f5204cf4e59bf07502970d4391c64da3.jpg

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8 minutes ago, Red90 said:

Roller bearings don't wear....

That has to be one of the most laughable statements of all time :hysterical:

They might wear slower than other bearing types but they'll still wear all the same. The only bearing type I can think of at the moment that will produce next to no wear is an air or oil bearing provided no contaminants get in them.

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27 minutes ago, Ed Poore said:

That has to be one of the most laughable statements of all time :hysterical:

They might wear slower than other bearing types but they'll still wear all the same. The only bearing type I can think of at the moment that will produce next to no wear is an air or oil bearing provided no contaminants get in them.

I assume that you do not understand the definition of "wear". Obviously it can happen from contamination. But contamination aside, roller bearing failure modes do not include wear.  Overloading or overlife use failures are from fatigue of the metal which leads to spalling of the surface.  To the untrained, this may appear to be wear.  Bearings are sized to a load and life that will leave them unchanged through their life period and will show not change in dimensions unless this load or life is exceeded as long as the lubricant is maintained and not contaminated.  There is no "wear" of the parts.

As to the design change shown above, they most likely changed as it is easier to setup the taper roller bearings.  There is little thrust load, so the benefit is little from a bearing loading perspective.

Edited by Red90
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1 hour ago, Gazzar said:

 

Is the lt230 derived from the series 1 tonne transfer box?

It looks kind of familiar...

 In fact the original transfer box principle, albeit without permanent four-wheel drive, dates back to the Series I of 1948. mentioned in https://www.autoexpress.co.uk/land-rover/range-rover/100624/lt230-the-best-ever-transfer-box

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