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Series 3 brake pipes


MagicMatt
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I’m just restoring  a 1983 series 3 swb. Does anyone have some pictures of how all the front and rear brake pipes are attached. Particular problems are:

1. Layout of brake pipes on front drums. I have four holes for pipe fittings, two top and two bottom 

2. positioning of rear brake pipe that runs along axle

thanks for any assistance

Matt

 

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1) I presume you've two wheel cylinders per back plate?

The route is, for a standard post rationalisation model. I think. Single line from PWDA to tee piece just behind no2 crossmember (with the steering relay in it).

From the Tee under the chassis, plastic clip, back to the brake pipe bracket.

From there is via Flexi hose to the little bracket on top of the swivel.

Form this you go to into the top cylinder (hole 1), out (hole 2) and on to the bottom cylinder(hole 3), and finally the bleed nipple (hole 4).

So, bleed nipple at the bottom, which is contra best practice, but there you go.

The near side is identical, except the pipe from the Tee goes along no 2 crossmember.

 

IMG_20191221_163418.jpg

IMG_20191222_124506.jpg

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2) back axle. Same concept, but the Flexi pipe is to the Tee on the axle, and then goes to the back plates. Underneath the check strap brake line protector.

IMG_20191210_184121.jpg

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It's more money, (and isn't it all) but whilst you're on,  you might throw in a valve at each corner. Catches the pressure and holds the shoe on fluid-pressure, rather than sitting on the snails. This evens-out all sorts of things, including better matching the self-servo 'grab' of drums, and grants a degree of self-adjustment. I could go on, but whenever this is suggested there seems to be a heap of hassle, so best I leave it there. Let's just say, any vehicle after the early 80s has these in the MC or slaves anyway. One each corner because LR springs are so powerful, they defeat 10lb - one valve per at circuit.

Brake Residual Pressure Valve.png

Edited by Landrover17H
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In short, built-in to MC or caliper, or ABS unit, just about every vehicle on the road has these valves in some form. They catch fluid-pressure as you back-off your pedal. In the case of drums, the shoe sits on the fluid, not the mechanical adjuster. What most seem to forget is brakes must be consistent. Because fluid pressure in that circuit is equal, brakes are granted equal adjustment. Now the shoes sit equi-distant from their respective drum, hence next prod, the self-servo and 'grab-point' is timed and matched. Less chance of your leafer going 'squirelly' in a force-stop.

As a rule, you'd put one per circuit as close to the MC as you can, thus catching a larger reservoir of pressure in that circuit.  These 'drop' at 10lb. Your mileage may vary, but series springs are so grunty you likley want one each corner, which now means unless each valve 'drops' at the same rate, pressure isn't strictly corner-matched. However, penny to a pound, they'll be better corner-matched than two snails. And your springs can't get matched anyway. What we really want is one 20lb RPV. Which if this was factory fit, it'd have. Do not go away with the idea this is the perfect solution, but it helps. You'll get some self-adjustment and won't mess with your snails quite as much. Because we have no return springs, (spring is the square-seal) this is even more successful for setting pads on discs. Most disc era vehicles have a RPV anyway, but I digress.

Edited by Landrover17H
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Undo the nuts holding the wheel cylinder on, enough to move the cylinder in a small amount.

You see why people do modifications to the standard system, don't you!

I think there are short bleed nipples..

 

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On 3/21/2020 at 9:07 PM, Gazzar said:

1) I presume you've two wheel cylinders per back plate?

The route is, for a standard post rationalisation model. I think. Single line from PWDA to tee piece just behind no2 crossmember (with the steering relay in it).

From the Tee under the chassis, plastic clip, back to the brake pipe bracket.

From there is via Flexi hose to the little bracket on top of the swivel.

Form this you go to into the top cylinder (hole 1), out (hole 2) and on to the bottom cylinder(hole 3), and finally the bleed nipple (hole 4).

So, bleed nipple at the bottom, which is contra best practice, but there you go.

The near side is identical, except the pipe from the Tee goes along no 2 crossmember.

 

IMG_20191221_163418.jpg

IMG_20191222_124506.jpg

Hope you don't mind me asking, who pegged your diff's?

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Its difficult  to know where to stop, I would like to make the rear reasonably durable so  I thought pegging then of course the two pin diff becomes the weak link,  I figured  an Ashcroft ATB is no more expensive than a 4 pin diff but its  24 spline so then I need Ashcroft half shafts, who makes EN26  10 / 24 half shafts?

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