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D2 Rear diff whine


Roosterrs
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My 2004 D2 TD5 whines when not under load at about around 40 mph and upwards. I think its comeing from the rear diff. I have removed the rear prop and I don't have any movement in the diff pinion. I do have around 30-40 degrees of rotation in the pinion with the rear prop connected. The front prop has hardly any rotation. I have had the rear in the air and the wheels rotate freely and no rocking. Is this amount of rotational movement normal or does it mean the planet gears are worn out and the diff needs replacing. I think the backlash between the pinion and crownwheel feels OK but it is difficult to tell.

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Sounds like the diff, that seems too much rotation for a rear especially if it's much more than the front on the same vehicle. Not sure what the whine would be but could be the bearings  which in turn could be swarf from the pins chewing their way through the centre. I'd take it for a run and stir the oil up and then drop the oil immediately and see if any clangs land in the pan and what colour the oil is. You may also be able to peer in through the filler hole and get somebody to slowly rotate a jacked up wheel to see what the inside looks like, but it's probably worth taking it out for a proper look.

The D2 diffs are basically the rubbish 2-pin design that break a lot in other vehicles. You can get one out of a later 90, any 300Tdi Disco or Disco 2, or the front of a 110 as a cheap fix, they are all 3.54 ratio 24 spline from early-mid 1990s vehicles, or get a recon from Xcess or Ashcroft. The only difference is the flange, which is different between different vehicles.

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Thanks for the info. Took the plug out of the rear axle and the oil is very black. Havn't dropped the oil yet. I have also noticed there is oil on the offside brake disc shield and it looks like its starting on the nearside one aswell. Vehicle milage is 108000. Thought it might be the bearing, but if the diff is failing, then the root cause is the diff and the rear hubs are secondary. Looking elsewhere I found a video showing a 110 rear diff which showed the driveshafts had worn out. These were the ones with circlips on the end rather than the D2 nut type.

Secondly new hubs, I have sern these vary in price from £40 - over £100 each. Where is the best place to get these from? I don't want to buy cheap but if the £40 one and an £80 one are the same make, then I will go for these. 

 

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On the rear hubs you may be lucky that it's just the O ring leaking. Cheap and easy fix. However, when I tried this it ended up having to be a new hub. Be careful buying cheap hubs. The main problem can be a difference in the number of teeth on the ABS hub which will cause the 3 amigoes to come on. I buy OEM hubs.

O ring number 2 on here http://new.lrcat.com/#!/1232/35470/35681/2704

HTH,

Griff

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Pretty standard failure. The 2 pin diffs are made of cheese. The only surprise is that they continued to make them for 30 years without addressing the problem, though admittedly it became more of an issue on later vehicles as they became more powerful. The early 2.25 and 2.5 engines would be unlikely to break a pin if it was literally made of mozzarella :hysterical:

 

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