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Just about ready to fit Rear Door on my Rebuild. Ran out of money , Out of work with this Situation we are All In, Hopefully we will all get through it.

Anyway its not bad Really apart from one corner and bit in the middle. Is there any  way I can  fix this without having to pay for welding.

 

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I recently repaired mine with a new skin and welded a replacement bottom section in and patches elsewhere. By the end of it I wish I'd just bought a new door it really wasn't worth it. Mine was a lot worse than yours, I wouldn't have thought there would be an "acceptable" repair other than welding a new piece in but you could clean up and paint to prevent it getting worse and put tackling it off for further down the line. The previous owner of my 110 used various non-welding solutions to rot, all of which trapped water and made the job more difficult when it came time to do a proper repair. If you're worried about strength then once you've cleaned up and painted the frame, fixing a sheet of metal/chequer plate as a cover for it will stiffen it up a bit more.

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If you don't have a welder I'm not sure how much you could do to improve matters yourself. Are you more concerned with cosmetics or structural integrity?

My door was considerably worse structurally before I did anything about it. It couldn't take a spare wheel, but it kept most of the rain out.

The repairs that door needs aren't too difficult, but will certainly be time consuming. 
 

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4 hours ago, Sharp said:

I recently repaired mine with a new skin and welded a replacement bottom section in and patches elsewhere. By the end of it I wish I'd just bought a new door it really wasn't worth it. Mine was a lot worse than yours, I wouldn't have thought there would be an "acceptable" repair other than welding a new piece in but you could clean up and paint to prevent it getting worse and put tackling it off for further down the line. The previous owner of my 110 used various non-welding solutions to rot, all of which trapped water and made the job more difficult when it came time to do a proper repair. If you're worried about strength then once you've cleaned up and painted the frame, fixing a sheet of metal/chequer plate as a cover for it will stiffen it up a bit more.

Might try the checker plate, just to tidy it up till later date. 

 

1 hour ago, mickeyw said:

If you don't have a welder I'm not sure how much you could do to improve matters yourself. Are you more concerned with cosmetics or structural integrity?

My door was considerably worse structurally before I did anything about it. It couldn't take a spare wheel, but it kept most of the rain out.

The repairs that door needs aren't too difficult, but will certainly be time consuming. 
 

Not bothered how it looks as on inside, but will try and cut it out and make decent for now.

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That is a very early door! Look after it, don't drill holes in it, the replacement doors are rubbish in comparison. 

It looks asif it's split in multiple places, cover/fill it with wax and weld it properly in the future when you can. 

 

Regards,

Adam.

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