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Thoughts and Musings on the Ineos Grenadier


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41 minutes ago, missingsid said:

Absolutely agree that the prototype was plagiarised, it was a jeep's rolling chassis. Wouldn't know about the SD1, what was it a copy of?

The modern car industry like the film/music/tv industries copies each other work if it is sucessfull. Good business sense of just lazy.

Only the musinc industry seems to do anything about it.

"The designers of both Triumph and Rover submitted plans for the new car, of which the latter was chosen. David Bache was to head the design team, inspired by exotic machinery such as the Ferrari Daytona and 365 GTC/4"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rover_SD1

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On 9/8/2020 at 1:38 PM, Anderzander said:

It does say you can fit a pallet in the back, so they must have done something with the wheel boxes.

This is a feature that was widely promoted on the Santana ps10 landrover:

$_86.JPG

So they copied that as well. I think they have done a great job taking the best from other offroaders and create a good all purpose vehicle. It is, after all the spritual replacement of the defender. The fact that they could buy an existing facility in France means it is probably the difference between profitable and making a loss. I certainly hope it will succeed.

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I suspect the Grenadier will have similar wheel boxes, but narrower with a wider floor; the original LR floor dimensions were set by the Series axle width and could have been changed when the 110 was introduced, but they obviously decided to change the bare minimum to keep costs down, just altering the wheel arch position in the tub side and little more. Since Ineos are starting with longer axles and don’t have to worry about legacy rear door dimensions, they can set the floor width considerably wider.  It’ll be interesting to see whether they have curved wheel arches and otherwise flat floor like the Hi Cap, square boxes like a Sankey, or full length boxes like the Land Rovers.  Each has advantages.

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Any idea what the black rectangles near the door bottoms are?

I can see from a handling perspective why they want the radius and trailing arms to be horizontal, but their chassis connections drop a long way.  They’ll cause hang ups in some off road conditions.  I wonder if they plan to sell skid plates to blend the brackets to the chassis rail more smoothly.  If not, I suppose it’ll be an early aftermarket accessory.

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there's still lots of low hanging lumpy bits underneath , and I notice it appears to be missing the right side wiper again ? Overall more clearly a functional 4x4 as opposed to the somewhat bland SUV appearance of the new Defender .

It would be interesting to see it with a new and old 110 either side ...

Steve

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That’s interesting- difficult isn’t it though to pick out what’s there for the test mule and what will carry into production.

The suspension links look chunky ... big windscreen, not sure I like the windscreen. Functionally though it looks there.

Also strikes me that seeing it like that it looks less like a 110 than on many of the images.  Parts of it look more older style G Wagen than Defender to me.

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1 hour ago, Snagger said:

Any idea what the black rectangles near the door bottoms are?

I can see from a handling perspective why they want the radius and trailing arms to be horizontal, but their chassis connections drop a long way.  They’ll cause hang ups in some off road conditions.  I wonder if they plan to sell skid plates to blend the brackets to the chassis rail more smoothly.  If not, I suppose it’ll be an early aftermarket accessory.

strap rails with slide & lock in rings for stowage, same as under the rear sidewindows, god knows why they need to be at the bottom of the doors. 

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I see the copy and past function on their design computers is working quite well :D

It looks good except for the front which reminds me of the Iveco Massif. And why is the bumper so huge - perhaps for impact regulations?

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https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/features/ineos-grenadier-meet-designer-controversial-roader?fbclid=IwAR32O0y16SaSR3q0NMTaTaiwKmkvFjGmkpF4I5WUji7lttpR7J9AnzZnn7w

Another article in Autocar that shows the clear, blue water between the Grenadier designer, Toby Ecuyer, and Our Gerry.

Who is Toby Ecuyer, (lifted from the Autocar indent panel)

"Toby Ecuyer is the epitome of a self-made man. His parents lived on a farm in the Peak District and didn’t have a car. When he left school at 16, with neither exam qualifications nor their blessing, he certainly didn’t seem to be heading for any kind of eminent career. But he did have a consciousness of modern design, not least of the latest cars, an ability at technical drawing and “a lovely letter” from Austin Rover’s design department, to which he’d sent some speculative car designs as an 11-year-old. That was his first sense, he says, that design could be a career.

He walked from home into nearby Derby seeking work by “knocking on 30 or 40 doors, any place with a drawing board visible through the window” until he was taken on by a small local architecture practice as a YTS recruit. The architects – under whose wing he soon rose from print boy to draughtsman – were lecturers at the local poly and introduced him to the idea of further study. Eventually, with their support, he alighted on a foundation design course in Torquay, which led (after he’d won “a few competitions”) to architecture school in Plymouth, where he both loved the work and learned to sail to a professional standard. A desire for adventure led to a first career as a professional sailing boat skipper and a love for “the tiny village” aspect of boats, but in his twenties, with a few close shaves behind him, he decided a more formal career was needed.

A chance sighting of a small ad in Yachting World prompted him to illustrate his CV on a very long sheet of paper (“I was never any good at writing”) and won him his first job as a yacht designer.

A prize-winning design and a chance meeting at the resulting Monaco ceremony led to a much bigger job and, over the next 20 years, to his building a reputation as one of the world’s greatest in the field. It was on this journey that he met Sir Jim Ratcliffe, and the Ineos phase began."

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2 hours ago, Retroanaconda said:

I see the copy and past function on their design computers is working quite well :D

It looks good except for the front which reminds me of the Iveco Massif. And why is the bumper so huge - perhaps for impact regulations?

The bumper reminds me of the european spec bumper on the Jeep Wrangler. The US version has a much smaller one from memory.

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9 hours ago, western said:

strap rails with slide & lock in rings for stowage, same as under the rear sidewindows, god knows why they need to be at the bottom of the doors. 

I’d initially thought that and then dismissed it because it seems so pointless!

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11 hours ago, Retroanaconda said:

I see the copy and past function on their design computers is working quite well :D

Ineos should've sponsored Tracing Point instead of Mercedes.

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