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Thoughts and Musings on the Ineos Grenadier


Bowie69

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2 hours ago, landroversforever said:

Can't find any pictures of the cover, but saw a mag in Tesco earlier with the Grenadier on it with the title: 'Ineo Defender' 

That's excellent.  I have long been sick of every off-roader being referred to as a Jeep.  Nice to see a proper yardstick being used...

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9 hours ago, Bowie69 said:

Anti-roll bars don't preclude off-road flex, late RRCs and Discos had them, and I don't remember anyone complaining about flex off road, did they?

Short memory?  There were a lot of complaints when they were first introduced.  The first  thing I did when my 110 passed its VIN text was to remove the anti-roll bar.  I actually did a test with the old work M£$%bi*&^.  Removing the front anti-roll bar near enough doubled articulation and made a HUGE difference to off-road traction.  

It also made it much nicer on road.  Yes, there was more body roll but it was also less choppy and more compliant.  I'd love to remove at least one from my Freelander 2 to see what happens but there are wires attached, for goodness sake...

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4 hours ago, Bowie69 said:

Another promo video dropped:

 

Loved it!

The Halo Trust break vehicles; a great test and a good target to meet. If the reparability is as promised, I will be delighted.

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After my recent, and rather unpleasant brush with the Big C I just hope I live long enough to be able to be able to perhaps buy one of these things because I grow bored of this seemingly endless drip, drip of promotional material and videos. I was a keen supporter of the idea of a pukka, well thought out, reasonably priced, capable utility 4x4 but time is relentlessly rolling by and the more it passes and the more videos I see I'm regrettably beginning to see more of a fat Santana PS-10 or Iveco Massif than I do any original overall body design features. My truck is overdue for replacement but I look around at what's available at sensible money and just shrug my shoulders and sigh due to complete and utter boredom. 

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Fair call but, if you're old truck is still working, that's actually a blessing and much cheaper than getting a new one.  I reckon, based on where they are with testing, that they're probably only a year away now.  It might seem like a very long time when the big C has been to visit - on the other hand I'd have thought, in the circumstances, that the brand of car you drove would be of very trivial importance?  I had my own scare nine years ago and I know it rearranged my perspectives a bit.

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On 6/24/2021 at 9:46 PM, deep said:

Fair call but, if you're old truck is still working, that's actually a blessing and much cheaper than getting a new one.  I reckon, based on where they are with testing, that they're probably only a year away now.  It might seem like a very long time when the big C has been to visit - on the other hand I'd have thought, in the circumstances, that the brand of car you drove would be of very trivial importance?  I had my own scare nine years ago and I know it rearranged my perspectives a bit.

I have attempted to respond to the above on three separate occasions all have been rather too personal and rather too long. So all I shall say is what one person perceives as trivial is potentially going to be different to another.
My initial diagnosis last year was terminal cancer with not much time left, three weeks or so later it changed to a different and  potentially treatable cancer. There then followed discomfort, pain, tests, treatment, pretty unpleasant side effects etc Then, just just last month, and to my complete surprise, I was informed that I was in complete remission. All the aforementioned has changed my outlook concerning rather a lot of things. If I am able, and wish to spend some money on a new vehicle now you might understand why I might get a tad impatient having had some tough lessons on life being so short and hold on it so tenuous. As an aside a friend of mine passed away this week. He was a bit younger than me and diagnosed with the B'stard Big C after me. We all have our stories to tell, some of mine have impacted on the amount of patience I have for certain things ...which is why I posted what I did on Wednesday 🙂

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10 hours ago, Happyoldgit said:

I have attempted to respond to the above on three separate occasions all have been rather too personal and rather too long. So all I shall say is what one person perceives as trivial is potentially going to be different to another.
My initial diagnosis last year was terminal cancer with not much time left, three weeks or so later it changed to a different and  potentially treatable cancer. There then followed discomfort, pain, tests, treatment, pretty unpleasant side effects etc Then, just just last month, and to my complete surprise, I was informed that I was in complete remission. All the aforementioned has changed my outlook concerning rather a lot of things. If I am able, and wish to spend some money on a new vehicle now you might understand why I might get a tad impatient having had some tough lessons on life being so short and hold on it so tenuous. As an aside a friend of mine passed away this week. He was a bit younger than me and diagnosed with the B'stard Big C after me. We all have our stories to tell, some of mine have impacted on the amount of patience I have for certain things ...which is why I posted what I did on Wednesday 🙂

I wanted to respond to you with a supportive comment,  but it is not easy to write to someone who has experienced events such as those you have at the risk of sounding trite or contrascedning.

So I for one appreciate you comment though you have no need to explain and wish you renewed health and longevity.

 

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11 hours ago, missingsid said:

I wanted to respond to you with a supportive comment,  but it is not easy to write to someone who has experienced events such as those you have at the risk of sounding trite or contrascedning.

So I for one appreciate you comment though you have no need to explain and wish you renewed health and longevity.

 

 

Thank you for your thoughtful and kind words and wishes. I  confess to invariably being being a bit embarrassed rereading my own posts recently as they tend to make me acutely aware that I have merely trodden the same path as millions before me and that sadly many more will follow. I recently heard or read somewhere that apparently one in two people will contract the B'stard Big C disease at some point in their lives, I never thought I'd be one of them - grrrrrr.

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It seems as getting it and surviving it are equally a lottery (you said you prognosis went from bad to good, great news), fast detection is key so the openness of you Dr to it is also a lottery. My brothers Dr was close minded mine was open. I was the one who needed it so I was lucky.

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As you say it is a lottery. My GP diagnosed pulled stomach muscles based solely on what I'd said and advised rest and painkillers. Several days later, unable to keep any food or drink down and in acute pain I asked my wife to take me to A&E, good job she obliged.

Edited by Happyoldgit
Phone induced typos
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Unfortunately, a lot of GPS are worse than useless - they obstruct treatment while costing a fortune.  Look at how so many of them are determined to avoid a return to physical consultations.  The sad thing, apart from the dire consequences for the ill members of the public who go untreated (calling them patients would be inaccurate as that suggests they under care), it also casts the whole profession in a bad light.  In my experience, only about half of doctors, GPS and hospital, are fit to practice.  They drastically increase the workload for the good doctors and nurses while further increasing the costs to the tax payer, as well as being a threat to patients.  Doctors refusing to see patients, like those BMA members, should be struck off and their big state pensions cancelled.  It’s also high time that doctors had recurrent training and requalification, and that doctors trained overseas have to requalify in the UK rather than have their original qualification accepted as so many nations have appalling standards and are also so open to fraud.  They could exempt some nations, but that becomes a political minefield.  It might make recruitment and retention harder, but if all doctors were competent and benevolent, we wouldn’t need so many, and those remaining could be paid better and the service would be far more reliable and efficient.

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Not sure about foreign Dr's not having to re qualify? I know two foreign Dr's who cannot practice as the costs to qualify in the UK are so high. They can work as research Dr's only. One of them is only working as a hospital Nurse.

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The problem is that there are certain places where fraud and cheating are a norm and fake qualifications are extremely common.  It doesn’t much matter whether the certificate are counterfeit, or they’re genuine but bought from corrupt officials or obtained by paying someone else to sit the exams, the results are the same.  It is rampant in some countries, and the UK recruits a lot of doctors from the region.

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There's no doubt about it that it is a bit of a worry. I'm currently feeling a bit abandoned care wise, after the last PET scan early last month I was declared free of cancer [was grade IV meaning it had spread from its initial site to various organs], I had a telephone consultation with the chap in charge of my care and treatment on the 19th of last month during which I reported a number of issues I still had and that I felt the same as I did when receiving chemo but as these are not rare [still painful and life changing though] he was not unduly concerned. I was then told the next time they would contact would be for another telephone consultation in September. The majority of people in the Non Hodgkin's Lymphoma cancer support group that have finished their chemo are or have been subject to regular blood tests wether in remission or not just to monitor what's going on. I was subject to daily bloods, sometimes several times a day and this continued during treatment as an outpatient. Strange how these things vary from consultant to consultant, hospital to hospital, trust to trust.

Damn another long, totally off topic post about me. Sorry guys, I'm still pretty much shielding until I can take the antibody test in a week or two and I may have picked up a touch of cabin fever despite wearing a mask. I may have to complain to Da Management 😁

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