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Swivel Hub filler rusted solid


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I’ve had to hammer sockets on before to get them off. The square design is not good and they are one of those parts that is exposed to lots of corrosion but not undone regularly, as a result I keep spares in case I have to resort to such measures. 

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You can get brass or stainless versions from the hydraulics shop, a lot of them are BSP or BSPT thread standard blanking plugs.

For bonus points you can get them with magnets in to collect any swarf/debris - Nige makes some lovely ones that have insanely strong magnets in:

https://megasquirt-v8.co.uk/diff_offroad.php

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The plugs should be taper thread, so they only need to be nipped up with light finger pressure - you will feel them tighten as they are wound in. No need to "torque them up" tight.

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I've fitted all plug locations which didn't already have magnetic plugs with a regular steel plug with a high strength magnet glued to it.  Every time I remove one of these plugs, either for an oil change or just a check, there is a "bloom" of material on it.  I've learnt to not be alarmed by this since if you smear it on garage cleaning paper it amounts to no more than oil/grease with a very small amount of ferrous material in it, although enough to make it magnetic.  I also have a magnetic sleeve for my engine oil filter and when I used to check the filter content at oil change the residue there used to frighten me.  There's no apparent deterioration in my 300Tdi engine, so I no longer worry about the "bloom".  Likewise for my transmission and differential drain plugs.

Yes, I do recommend fitting magnetic plugs to all oil drain points.

Mike

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Freeze/Heat

Warm it up to hot, then when it's cooled , use plumbers freeze spray to super-cool it. I made up a socket, using a pin socket and then used the rattle gun to assist in breaking the rust bond

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I don't apply heat to the plug as that will make it easier to accidentally round off if you get it really hot followed by some force. Instead, I get the area surrounding the plug hot with a blow torch to expand the threads around the plug followed by a good few whacks with a hammer directed traight on the plug itself. Then try to undo it. I think if you do it like that it should come undone. 

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