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Complemetary rear Shock absorber supports in a salisbury Axel. where to weld It?


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Hi to all

Please if some of you have indications and photos where is the best ubication to weld the supports (DA4515)  in the Salisbury axel, Is important for me.

[url=https://postimg.cc/Vd4nyWSK][img]https://i.postimg.cc/kgPcbj7P/1604942724782-1604942698867-1604942675605-0-IMG-20201109-WA0025.jpg[/img][/url]

 

Thanks

Edited by Muttland
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3 hours ago, Muttland said:

Hi to all

Please if some of you have indications and photos where is the best ubication to weld the supports (DA4515)  in the Salisbury axel, Is important for me.

[url=https://postimg.cc/Vd4nyWSK][img]https://i.postimg.cc/kgPcbj7P/1604942724782-1604942698867-1604942675605-0-IMG-20201109-WA0025.jpg[/img][/url]

 

Thanks

1604942724782-1604942698867-1604942675605-0-IMG-20201109-WA0025.jpg

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I see! in that case I'd ask why do you want two shocks? IMO these days a decent single shock is readily available. Twin shocks like that are a bit of a thing of the past unless on a seriously tight budget.

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57 minutes ago, mmgemini said:

That only lets one shocker work at a time. Depends on how the axle lifts as to weather the front or rear shocker works

 

They will both work as the working length of both shocks changes as the axle goes up and down. It's just pointless extra weight to carry around if you use a single decent shock.

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1 minute ago, landroversforever said:

They will both work as the working length of both shocks changes as the axle goes up and down.

Correct, the axle rolls a very small amount when flexing, but nothing to speak off, the damping between the shocks will be nigh on identical.

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20 minutes ago, landroversforever said:

They will both work as the working length of both shocks changes as the axle goes up and down. It's just pointless extra weight to carry around if you use a single decent shock.

The axle WILL NOT go up and down it will only try to rotate on the axis. Try it with a LEGO model.

Draw a triangle with the flat surface at the top. Now press the point at the bottom up. You can't move it.

Have you driven one with that set up? No rear axle movement

 

 

Edited by mmgemini
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They're telescopic, not solid so it will move up. If it's not moving that's because it's overspecced for the vehicle weight. 

Second mounts like that are for using multiple, cheaper, shocks on it. If you stuck 2 OME on there then it would be difficult as you've got twice the resistance. 

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48 minutes ago, mmgemini said:

The axle WILL NOT go up and down it will only try to rotate on the axis. Try it with a LEGO model.

Draw a triangle with the flat surface at the top. Now press the point at the bottom up. You can't move it.

Have you driven one with that set up? No rear axle movement

 

 

We've been through this before, even down to a rubber band model, yes it will move normally.

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Both dampers would work in that system.  The amount they work would not quite be equal because the axle moves in an arc around the front end of the trailing arm and A-frame, where they connect to the chassis, so if the dampers were set symmetrically fore and aft at rest, then the aft damper will travel a bit more of its stroke than the fore damper, but not enough to matter.

Unless you’re carrying very heavy loads all of the time, you’ll have very stiff and uncomfortable suspension that may reduce handling as much as comfort as the suspension will struggle to conform to uneven surfaces.  Most suspension “upgrades” sold by aftermarket suppliers are anything but.

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I hope this helps. I used this setup when I over landed from Somerset to Cape town in 2003. In Kenya a Missionary who worked along the Moyale to Masabit Road commented that this was only way that they could get the shocks to last on the rough roads. If they ran a single set, did not what what shock type, they were toast. yet with this set up they lasted. All the Tanzanian safari land rovers we also encountered ran this set up. This was us after I got caught up in the rutts of the 10 ton trucks that drive this road and ended up in the trees after coming off the road.

P2200066 (1).JPG

P2200061 (1).JPG

Kenya (321).JPG

Kenya (538).JPG

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Arjan that why I did it as we were loaded and I was expecting to drive a lot of unpaved roads. Coming down from Wadi Halfa in Sundan one of our fellow travellers in an identical 110 cooked his rear shocks and had to replace them when I was fine. 

I see Muttland is based in Uruguay so if he is driving lots of unpaved roads I understand why he is asking.

With regards to skidding off the road, at 50 miles an hour I was praying we were not going to roll and test the roll cage. Parking in the thicket seemed a better idea.

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If you're cooking your shocks you need better shocks... given that genuine ones are rated for thrashing across the desert in a laden 130 ambulance (3500kg+ gvw) I'd question if aftermarket shocks may not be as rufty-tufty as they make out.

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