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hi all just need a bit of help as heard different answers i have a 90 defender with 1999 disco 1 axels on it i am splitting the brake system so the foot brake just does front wheels and i will be putting fiddle brakes on rear i have big bore fiddle chambers so i was looking to put maybe 110 front calipers on the rear as they are bigger pads and twin pistons to get better braking force has any one done this and is it a good upgrade by the way this is a total off road truck not been used on road thanks in advance for any help 

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I did this on my lightweight for modified trials, however I welded on additional caliper brackets as car still used for road duties. I used triumph acclaim master cylinders connected into vacuum pipe, you actually don't need as much braking force as you think as for pure off road the surface is invariably slippy, a word of warning though, these put a lot of strain on your diff etc, so I would also look at upgrading halfshafts etc, I had a lot of diff breakage until I fitted a salsbury back axle and then later a normal axle with ARB locker, if you look at modified trials vehicles most of them have a salsbury back axle hope this helps regards Stephen 

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5 hours ago, Stellaghost said:

I did this on my lightweight for modified trials, however I welded on additional caliper brackets as car still used for road duties. I used triumph acclaim master cylinders connected into vacuum pipe, you actually don't need as much braking force as you think as for pure off road the surface is invariably slippy, a word of warning though, these put a lot of strain on your diff etc, so I would also look at upgrading halfshafts etc, I had a lot of diff breakage until I fitted a salsbury back axle and then later a normal axle with ARB locker, if you look at modified trials vehicles most of them have a salsbury back axle hope this helps regards Stephen 

thanks for that ive put an ashcroft lsd in so should be ok with that in 

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16 minutes ago, biffer4240 said:

thanks for that ive put an ashcroft lsd in so should be ok with that in 

I'm not well versed on lsd but I thought they transferred power to the non spinning wheel because that is where the traction is due to non spinning wheel seemingly having more grip you putting the brake on will confuse the diff and perhaps cause damage sure someone on here can advise better regards Stephen

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31 minutes ago, FridgeFreezer said:

Is that not going to try and fight your fiddle brakes?:huh:

I think a plate type LSD is going to burn up pretty quick with fiddles. Can't imagine a geared torque biasing one being particularly pleased either as I don't think they fully disconnect from the opposing side? 

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5 hours ago, Stellaghost said:

I'm not well versed on lsd but I thought they transferred power to the non spinning wheel because that is where the traction is due to non spinning wheel seemingly having more grip you putting the brake on will confuse the diff and perhaps cause damage sure someone on here can advise better regards Stephen

An LSD will typically limit the difference in speed/torque between wheels, so turning both shafts rather than favouring the one with grip. The result would be the same when used with fiddles though.

Could it be worth dropping the LSD if you're after maximum agility, given they are prone to pushing on in right corners? You would then be able to brake a spinning wheel if traction is lost and transfer torque to the stationary one, like a manual form of ETC.

I am sure brake pads are cheaper than diff clutches etc.

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It could work if you lift a wheel and the LSD does not sense any internal friction; A quick brake action on the spinning wheel will restore traction.

It won't work for skid steering though.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 12/27/2020 at 11:35 PM, ThreePointFive said:

An LSD will typically limit the difference in speed/torque between wheels, so turning both shafts rather than favouring the one with grip. The result would be the same when used with fiddles though.

Could it be worth dropping the LSD if you're after maximum agility, given they are prone to pushing on in right corners? You would then be able to brake a spinning wheel if traction is lost and transfer torque to the stationary one, like a manual form of ETC.

I am sure brake pads are cheaper than diff clutches etc.

thanks for you comment most helpful cheers andy

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