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Tool for Series gearbox primary pinion nut 213416


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I’m looking for the tool required to move the primary pinion lock nut on a series gearbox. The nut is part no. number 213416 circled on this diagram.

<parts book extract>

I’ve found this on e-bay: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Land-Rover-Series-Gearbox-Primary-Pinion-Nut-Socket-Fits-Pinion-Nut-213416/264734679197 but either the picture in the listing is very misleading or this isn’t deep enough to fit over the shaft and reach the nut:

<picture>

The nut is around 180mm from the end of the shaft so the tool will need to be around 200mm long overall to reach the nut.

I’ve also found this: https://www.hnjengineering.co.uk/pages/products/213416/hnj213416.html which looks to be much more like the required proportions, but it’s quite spendy, and I’m not entirely convinced that Acetal is an ideal material for this kind of tool.

Has anyone tried either of these tools and if so, would you care to comment?

Land_Rover_Series_II_Parts_Catalogue_ocr page 170.jpg

IMG_3975.JPG

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I made the same as Steve b - scaffold tube with four tangs welded to it, and an old 1/2” socket welded to the inside of it to proved a square drive, which worked very well when I did my 2a a few years ago.

Stupidly I chucked it away after using it and now I need it again!

I almost purchased the one on eBay a few months ago until I realised it was totally useless - I did tell the seller who agreed it needed redesigning! And I agree the HNJ one is rather overpriced for a bit of plastic.

In the meantime I am doing as the Haynes manual suggests for a series gearbox - “the operator must decide how much noise or malfunction he can tolerate”!

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I have seen people trim a cheap socket (not sure what size) with a grinder to cut away the material between the teeth. That seems to work well. That nut has to be done up very tight according to the specs, around 100ftlbs if I remember correctly, but you can’t set it that accurately as the nut has to be aligned with one of the three tabs on the locking washer.  All the same, I can’t see a plastic tool doing the job.

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2 hours ago, Snagger said:

.... That nut has to be done up very tight according to the specs, around 100ftlbs if I remember correctly, but you can’t set it that accurately as the nut has to be aligned with one of the three tabs on the locking washer.  All the same, I can’t see a plastic tool doing the job.

When you use the 100 lbf-ft figure, are you sure you are not confusing the nut in question with the similarly styled castellated nut at the rear of the gearbox?
Item 47 v item 5 in the attached diagram?
1150019137_Land_Rover_Series_II_Parts_Ca

I can find no clear torque figure for item 5 in the S2 workshop manual. I note the S3 gearbox uses a different retaining method.

Overall, I don't think the principal of HNJ is an engineering idiot. Several people doubt the choice of acetal as a material, perhaps they should extend him the courtesy of asking him directly. Unlike many 'LR design engineers' he is still with us to be asked questions.

Regards.

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Doesn't this nut have a left handed thread?

Helpfully its a different size to the rear one.  I see someone's used a punch on it - I don't think its especially tight - certainly none of those I've undone have been after I realised they were left handed.

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You’re right David - I only looked quickly and thought it was the nut for the back of the main shaft, not the front of the lay shaft.  My SIII boxes all had a bolt, not a nut, for the front of the lay shaft.  That would break any plastic tool, but the lay shaft fixings are much lower torque, 25ish ftlbs I think, and may well be fine with plastic tools.  

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James Williams who runs HNJ is an accomplished engineer but he is also a series land rover user and thus the tools and other parts that he designs and makes.

All the tools that he makes he uses on a regular basis  so if a tool is made from acetal then it is up to spec to do the job.

 

Peter

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