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Do you need a spare wheel?


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Goodyear have just taken bottom spot on my list below the godawful Roadchamp POS tyres that were on my disposable Chavalier when I bought that as a runabout - at least they just has hard, greasy rubber and had one egg shaped with a bulge in the tread the size of my hand, but none let go!  Let’s face it - XCL, XZL and G90; if they were bought by the MoD for our servicemen to use, they must have been dreadful.  

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8 hours ago, smallfry said:

Another Goodyear !

Actually that was a General Grabber and I was less than impressed, no tyre managed more than 15k. Plenty of tread but sidewalls perished.

Replaced them with Goodyear Wrangler Duratracs and they were orders of magnitude better.

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I had seen that as Goodyear too, with the “er” the only bit of the name visible.  Another on the list.  It’s is becoming extensive - the Dunlops I had last on the Volvo were very poor, wet or dry, on the roads in DXB and wore very quickly, so no more of them(the all weather tyres that replaced them last summer have been far better, even in the hot dry summers, and it think they’re Continental Cross-something).  The Hankook ATs on the RRC LSE rims I bought for the 109 went onto my RRC and were far inferior to the worn BFG ATs they replaced on wet or frosty roads.  I have been unimpressed by Michelin.

I have been really pleased with BFG, so may just stick with them.  But I had thought General Grabber and Cooper highly reputable.  Unless you hot a hard object at high speed, like a kept, brick or deep pot hole, then there is no excuse for that failure, Ed. 🙁

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15 minutes ago, Snagger said:

But I had thought General Grabber and Cooper highly reputable.  Unless you hot a hard object at high speed, like a kept, brick or deep pot hole, then there is no excuse for that failure, Ed. 🙁

That particular one was a piece of rock in the lake district which also damaged the rear on the same side.

Replaced them with another set of General Grabber ATs as they were the only "all terrain" available for that size. Lost another one to a small stick going through the sidewall. About 8k after fitting a set I was servicing the L322 and noticed the inside of the sidewall was simply perishing and cracking up.

Everyone ranted and raved about them on Range Rovers and I've been less than impressed. By comparison the Duratracs were phenomenal.

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On 7/13/2021 at 7:04 PM, Dave W said:

Typical really given that this topic is under discussion...

Had I not had a spare with me on Sunday myself and my dog would have been stranded at the side of the A1M after the OSF tyre sidewall seems to have disintegrated. No idea what caused it as the tyre is only a couple of years old. The inner wall was undamaged, the outer bead is undamaged but the wall has split from the tread. 70MPH on the A1M, no warning, no vibrations before it went.

With the spare and the means of changing it we were probably only on the hard shoulder for around 10 mins.

Probably not repairable with sticky string...

IMG_9977.jpeg.d0370a3a87193babdbc0d8cafbc1e044.jpeg

Slow deflation from a nail hole, tyre sidewall gradually gets v v v v v hot - bang flubbleubbleubble bits everywhere - often not much warning if you're driving in a straight line, if cornering the handling will go a bit spongy with the sidewall flex.

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12 hours ago, Ed Poore said:

Actually that was a General Grabber and I was less than impressed, no tyre managed more than 15k. Plenty of tread but sidewalls perished.

Replaced them with Goodyear Wrangler Duratracs and they were orders of magnitude better.

Sorry, looked like a Goodyear AT. Anyway, General Grabber is one brand I would not buy. Back in the day, when I was into Custom and Hot Rods, they had a reputation for lasting well but being ditch finders, and perishing. Great for burnouts being that they had no grip ! Back to these days, I see many "TRs" with perishing sidewalls but lots of tread, so I guess not much has changed there. Maybe the UK climate doesn't suit them ?

SWMBO has Goodyear ATs on her Jimny, and they have lasted well with no problems at all. I hate budget tyres, so I generally buy their Vector all seasons for my daily drivers, and again have had no problems, other than the previously mentioned sidewall tear, but that would have finished off most tyres ! I have got MTRs on my 90, but that hasnt turned a wheel for a few years now, but they are not at all perished.

Dont know about Cooper. Lot of them about, but never has any myself, but in the past I have had Goodrich ATs, MTs, and my favourite all rounder, the Trac Edge, and all of them  were fine, other than the MTs being a bit skiddy (and a bit noisy) on the road, but thats only to be expected. I would buy the Trac Edge again, I dont know why they were discontinued ☹️

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I never had any issues with my General Grabbers, a fair bit better than the BFG ATs I had afterwards...

For me one of the all-time great tyres was the Michelin XPC. Great on and off-road, bit more on-road biased I guess. Shame they stopped making those.

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On 7/9/2021 at 11:30 PM, Escape said:

The powers of the forum at work: for my 250 mile trip on Thursday I actually put the spare tyre back in the Range Rover. Checked pressure and everything!

For today's trip with the trailer I'm even gonna include the jack! 🙃

I recently had a blowout on a single axle trailer wheel.  I had the correct spare, wheel brace, socket and a jack, but .... with the trailer down on the wheel rim I couldn't get the jack under the axle.  I was helped by a local farmer who appreciated the problem and went and fetched his trolley jack and a hi-lift jack, just in case the trolley jack wouldn't go under.  So, check that your jack will go under your vehicle if the rim is on the road.

Mike

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If you have (or can find) a piece of wood or a flat rock or something, you can drive the flat tyre onto that so you have a bit more clearance for the jack. 😉

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And carry a smallish square of plywood to put the jack on. Soft ground will result in the jack going down, rather than the vehicle going up.

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DaveW's blowout looked to me like a Cooper ST Maxx, and as I was renewing pads it prompted me to look closely at ours. They have been very satisfactory and  are about 10 years old, and we don't do so many miles, so from tread depth still some wear left. But on some there was a crack forming just beyond the bead. New tyres time.

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