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Simon_CSK
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Have bought another TDV8 Sport this time with an engine fire. I have most if not all the parts to fix this but really interest in your thoughts having never done  what will essentially be a rewire.

It looks like the seat of the fire was to the back  on the right. I know there is some wiring damage under the OS front wheel arch and this has taken out the liner. The wires to the pre heater have been toasted as well. Front a very very quick look in the cab there appears no damage under the dash. gut do know the section of the loom goes in both sides of the bulk head which will probably mean removing the dash and the body control unit.

The drivers wheel appeared to be sitting at an angle so will need to look at that as well. Possibly some of the bushes got a little fried. 

I also recon the brake pipes will need looking at as the fluid is low and think it may have boiled off.

 

 

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You're a brave man to start such a project! I'd be worried about the damage that can't be seen unless fully stripped (and even then) but might show up over time, with connections going bad etc.

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7 minutes ago, Escape said:

You're a brave man to start such a project! I'd be worried about the damage that can't be seen unless fully stripped (and even then) but might show up over time, with connections going bad etc.

The car is just as valuable in parts as it is as a car. However it only has 88000 on the clock and is absolutely immaculate.

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21 minutes ago, Peaklander said:

I wonder how it was extinguished. Maybe with CO2, as it looks clean.

That's quite a project to start alongside all the other hobby ones 🤣

I think it is dry powder as there is a lot of yellow dust under the bonnet.

The other projects are now reliant on other people to get finished I should be able to get on with this.

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2 minutes ago, elbekko said:

If it got hot enough to melt bushes, I'd be a bit worries about everything plastic nearby that must've gone very brittle now.

I will not know until I get the wheel off and start poking. While there was melting of the wheel arch liner I don't know to what extent just yet.

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Personally, I would start with the engine wiring.

At this stage, just strip back any cables that look singed & temporarily replace the individual cores where they are damaged.  I would just temporarily bridge the melted connectors at this stage. Then see if it will start.

Once you have the engine running, it's worth addressing the mechanical components that may have been damaged - as you know that with the wiring fixed properly, you'll have a running car.

If you can't get it running - there's no point in doing much more to it.

Replacing whole looms will be difficult & expensive.  If you have the time & money, do that.  However, just replacing the individual cores and connectors will likely be enough for the remaining life of the vehicle.

I've had good results with heat-shrink solder connectors long term, in wet environments.  They are ideal for replacing cores without adding too much bulk to the cable.

Looks like a nice project!

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Maybe not a concern, depending upon how it was extinguished, but if any of the metal pipes were glowing or any other important steelwork was quenched too quickly you could run into issues at a later date as structure of steel will be altered ie: the pipes in the picture could fracture with vibration regards Stephen

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19 minutes ago, simonr said:

Personally, I would start with the engine wiring.

At this stage, just strip back any cables that look singed & temporarily replace the individual cores where they are damaged.  I would just temporarily bridge the melted connectors at this stage. Then see if it will start.

Once you have the engine running, it's worth addressing the mechanical components that may have been damaged - as you know that with the wiring fixed properly, you'll have a running car.

If you can't get it running - there's no point in doing much more to it.

Replacing whole looms will be difficult & expensive.  If you have the time & money, do that.  However, just replacing the individual cores and connectors will likely be enough for the remaining life of the vehicle.

I've had good results with heat-shrink solder connectors long term, in wet environments.  They are ideal for replacing cores without adding too much bulk to the cable.

Looks like a nice project!

Si

The car is virtually spotless and it looks like the car was in a garage with a dry powder extinguisher to hand when it went up. I have pressure washed the top of the engine this afternoon and jacked it up to look at the inner wing as I noticed the damage when it was loaded on to my trailer by a fork lift.

The wiring is toast as is some of the cooling system. I have a complete car with all the spares as I blew a turbo and it wasn't worth fixing. Agree about bridging the wires where possible but on looking at it and feeling around it I beleive that the wiring is too far gone to do that. I have a complete enging bay loom (or two) so I am going to strip out as much damage in the engine bay this weekend to see the extent of the damage. Once I get down to good solid unburnt components then I can think about stripping the donor car.

If absolutely necessary I have a working engine just no LH turbo.

15 minutes ago, Stellaghost said:

Maybe not a concern, depending upon how it was extinguished, but if any of the metal pipes were glowing or any other important steelwork was quenched too quickly you could run into issues at a later date as structure of steel will be altered ie: the pipes in the picture could fracture with vibration regards Stephen

Firtunately it looks like a dry powder extinguisher was used to smother the fire so would cool down more naturally. 

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