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Fuel pipe OK to use copper microbore pipe


Rustyrangie
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Hi,

I've got the rear floor out of my RRC so thought it might be a good idea to replace the dodgy looking fuel lines while it's out.

Is it OK, safety & MoT wise, to use 8mm copper microbore central heating pipe for this?

£15.99 buys 10 meters of the stuff in Wickes, cheaper than steel or rubber.

It's the same size as the rust-prone steel original, won't rust again and will hopefully be easier to fit.

Any advice will be gratefully received.

Off out now to attack the "lace curtain" rear crossmember.

Cheers,

Bob.

3.9efi V8...currently in bits

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:D No problems for me. I have used it on my specials, both V8 and TDI without any problems, i ran a 2 x lengths down the chassis rails, one for feed and one for return. Then did the final link to tank, and carbs etc in rubber.

Much neater IMHO. ;)

Oz

Hi,

I've got the rear floor out of my RRC so thought it might be a good idea to replace the dodgy looking fuel lines while it's out.

Is it OK, safety & MoT wise, to use 8mm copper microbore central heating pipe for this?

£15.99 buys 10 meters of the stuff in Wickes, cheaper than steel or rubber.

It's the same size as the rust-prone steel original, won't rust again and will hopefully be easier to fit.

Any advice will be gratefully received.

Off out now to attack the "lace curtain" rear crossmember.

Cheers,

Bob.

3.9efi V8...currently in bits

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I did read on the old V8 owners forum that copper was a no no for some types of injection systems. I'm sure you will find something on Google if you look hard enough.

Hi Steve,

Did a Google as you suggested. Found lots of sites where copper pipe was used on all sorts of engines and fuel systems Rover V8 efi included but nothing really specific.

As for work hardening I'd only be using copper where it is rigidly mounted to the chassis. End connections would be flexible, rubber or plastic, of course.

Thanks to all who replied, off to have a think.

Bob

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Brake pipes are sometimes steel (factory), old ones were copper, newer stuff is copper/nickel I believe (AKA "Cunifer" for some reason). The walls are relatively thick on brake pipe because of the pressure involved so perhaps that prevents it from fatiguing? Mind you, more than once I've seen / experienced copper pipe shearing off when trying to undo the union so the work hardening stuff is not wrong...

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Cunifer is (was) a trade name, I havent seen it for some time now. You used to be able to get copper/nickel alloy pipe in larger sizes for fuel pipes etc as I used it on several kit cars in the past. I dont know where to get it now though.

Cunifer will not work harden and will easily outlast the car, it is also much tougher than copper so it's harder to bend neatly.

I don't like small bore pure copper pipe on a vehicle, I have seen it fracture even when attached to a chassis to stop it vibrating.

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Another Doh! moment here.

I just realised I have a large coil of 3/8" rigid plastic tube used for waveguide pressurisation on microwave radio systems (my old job). It's marked "All fuel, gas, air, SWP 5 bar" so I had some pipe all along and didn't know!

Hangs head in shame!

Bob

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Back to Cunifer = I wonder if there was some iron in there and hence

Cu - Copper

Ni - Nickel

Fe® - Iron

?

Rog

Dont be tempted to use any of the clear plastic pipe with the strands in it ," it is carp". As a very nice man we were banned from using it due to it spliting and setting fire to a members car on two ocasions I know of. We get it to use on the buses I repair now and it lasts about a month before it goese hard and splits. The only flexi pipe I would use is "GATES" high pressure pipe. Be carefull fitting flexi pipe to copper , unles the end is flared I would make sure the flexy is pushed well in and proper clips used.

Just as side note, P38 EFI broken down, wont start flooded , very nice man says soon sort that mate !!!. He took the spark plugs out and cranked the engine over to clear the exsess fuel out of the cylinders, plug leads ignited fuel coming out of cylinders setting fire to engine bay and himself . That was a very stupid and exspensive mistake , iff you suspect an engine is over fueled / flooded remove the fuel pump fuse and crank untill exses fuel clears. Usualy very quike to do and you dont even need to get dirty or set fire to youre self.

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