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10 bolt drive flanges??

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Hi,

I´ve broken several times the 5 bolts on my drive flanges....I am considering on making some custom drive flanges, but with 5 extra bolts...

As anyone did this mod? Will the hub have resistance troubles then??

Thanks

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How about checking their tightness regularly ? If these bolts are overtightened they stretch and then don't stay tight for very long, once loose the lash from the rotating drive flange can shear them. Use locktited bolts and torque to the correct setting.

HTH

Mo

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I had them breaking, but these were the early imperial bolts and hubs, with an Ashcroft slotted metric drivemember. It came undone forever and then sometimes break.

I now converted to metric hubs and use capheads (12.9) spec and plenty of welly. I havent ran them yet, but I think this will do it. Ten bolts is overkill I think. What about studs?

Daan

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Broken all 5 blimey!

what about the cush drives from ashcrofts?

These cush drives are out of the question because the drive flanges are for 35 and 30 spline applications (putting Salisbury´s/Danas under the truck). Nevertheless, I´ve managed to brake the 5 bolts with Rover axles, so I believe the same can happen with these axles.

How about checking their tightness regularly ? If these bolts are overtightened they stretch and then don't stay tight for very long, once loose the lash from the rotating drive flange can shear them. Use locktited bolts and torque to the correct setting.

HTH

I must say I´m not very carefull with these details, but I really would feel more confident if I had a stronger option than loctite and correct torque settings.

Mo

I had them breaking, but these were the early imperial bolts and hubs, with an Ashcroft slotted metric drivemember. It came undone forever and then sometimes break.

I now converted to metric hubs and use capheads (12.9) spec and plenty of welly. I havent ran them yet, but I think this will do it. Ten bolts is overkill I think. What about studs?

Daan

Sorry for my english, but I can´t really understand your point (I don´t really master the english mechanical names, sorry) could you explain me what is "imperial bolts and hubs", "slotted metric drivemember", "metric hubs and studs"...Pictures would be absolutely perfect :rolleyes:

Thanks

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I think Jack McNamara Differentials here in Melbourne do 10 bolt drive flanges, but I've only ever seen them with Salisbury 35 spline uprated axles.

If you are breaking the bolts on only one side I would suspect a bent axle housing or stub axle (spindle). This would be evident if there is an unusual wear pattern on the end of the axle splines and the splines of the drive flanges. Are you currently running Maxidrive drive flanges? These are a tighter fit on the halfshaft than standard Rover ones and will sometimes break or stretch the bolts with a bent housing wheras a worn stock one may not.

Bill.

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I use 12.9 allen headed bolts drilled and wired to stop them coming loose sorted that problem for me

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These cush drives are out of the question because the drive flanges are for 35 and 30 spline applications (putting Salisbury´s/Danas under the truck). Nevertheless, I´ve managed to brake the 5 bolts with Rover axles, so I believe the same can happen with these axles.

Sorry for my english, but I can´t really understand your point (I don´t really master the english mechanical names, sorry) could you explain me what is "imperial bolts and hubs", "slotted metric drivemember", "metric hubs and studs"...Pictures would be absolutely perfect :rolleyes:

Thanks

I was using an imperial axle (early rangerover), which has hubfixings in 3/8" unf. If you fit ashcroft driveshafts, you need defender drivemembers, which are metric fixings. This means holes for m10 bolts and a slightly different pitch. Ashcroft overcame this by machining the 10 mm holes into slots, making a 3/8 UNF a sloppy fit which get loose all the time. Currently Ashcroft sells special drivemembers which overcome this problem.

So if you have an m10 fixing, which I suspect you have, I would go for capheads in 12.9 class to replace the original hexheads in 10.9 class.

Studs: The problem with bolts is that they break right at the point were the thread runs out, which is pretty weak. If you were to fit a good quality stud instead of the bolt and use nuts to hold the member on, the area to be shared off is much greater, so the whole setup is much stronger. I could post a piccy later.

Daan

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I found it's important to check you have the right bolts - the plain shank should go into the hub, make sure the thread is not too long. Some non genuine ones are wrong.

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I found it's important to check you have the right bolts - the plain shank should go into the hub, make sure the thread is not too long. Some non genuine ones are wrong.

I'll second this!

I used to have endless problems with bolts coming undone on one axle and the occasional breakage. Replaced the bolts with new genuine ones + new lock washers and now they are fine!

Even with 8.8 bolts, the shear strength of the 5 bolts should exceed that of even the chunkiest half shaft. If they are breaking, there is another causal factor, probably fatigue caused by them not being tight enough and the flange rotating.

Si

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Hi,

Well, you are all probably right, I believe something wasn´t right for them to brake. Nevertheless, considering I have to make custom drive flanges to suit both 30 (front) and 35 spline (rear) shafts, I will probably get them in 10 bolt patern, I think you can´t ever have to much strength...my only concern is regarding the hub resistance....

Thanks

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